PDA

View Full Version : The pound in your pocket



BrilloPad
20th June 2012, 07:34
since 2005, prices in the UK are up 22.8 per cent. Since 1987, they are up 142 per cent. Since November 2009, just 31 months ago, prices are up 9.6 per cent – the pound in your pocket has lost a tenth of its value.

Inflation falls at last (http://www.cityam.com/latest-news/allister-heath/inflation-falls-last-the-damage-has-already-been-done)

The sufferers are savers who are mostly old people. Who have it too good at the expense of the young. It only becomes a worry if everyone decides there is no point in saving.

suityou01
20th June 2012, 07:36
since 2005, prices in the UK are up 22.8 per cent. Since 1987, they are up 142 per cent. Since November 2009, just 31 months ago, prices are up 9.6 per cent – the pound in your pocket has lost a tenth of its value.

Inflation falls at last (http://www.cityam.com/latest-news/allister-heath/inflation-falls-last-the-damage-has-already-been-done)

The sufferers are savers who are mostly old people. Who have it too good at the expense of the young. It only becomes a worry if everyone decides there is no point in saving.

Yeah cos savers have had it right cushty with BOE base at 0.5% for the last 4 years :rolleyes:

MarillionFan
20th June 2012, 07:38
Where do they get a 'tenth' from?

BrilloPad
20th June 2012, 07:47
Where do they get a 'tenth' from?

Roughly now goods that cost 100p will now cost 109.6p. So you now get 91.24p worth of goods for your 100p. I think. Oh dear - this is more complicated than I thought.

IT JUST IS OKAY!

:eyes

MarillionFan
20th June 2012, 07:49
Roughly now goods that cost 100p will now cost 109.6p. So you now get 91.24p worth of goods for your 100p. I think. Oh dear - this is more complicated than I thought.

IT JUST IS OKAY!

:eyes

But it said prices were up 23%???

BrilloPad
20th June 2012, 07:50
:eek:

Feck me, I thought they'd reanimated Harold Wilson.

:frown

From wiki

Wilson was much criticised for a broadcast in which he assured listeners that the "pound in your pocket" had not lost its value. It was widely forgotten that his next sentence had been "prices will rise".

It is that sort of attitude which caused the UK to go downhill until Maggie came along.

BrilloPad
20th June 2012, 07:52
But it said prices were up 23%???

Since 2005. But since November 2009 (31 months ago) prices are up 9.6 per cent.

My pension is worth less and less. I think I will be lucky if I retire at 75.

MarillionFan
20th June 2012, 07:54
Since 2005. But since November 2009 (31 months ago) prices are up 9.6 per cent.

My pension is worth less and less. I think I will be lucky if I retire at 75.

I missed that bit. It's correct then.

Carry on.

Diver
20th June 2012, 07:57
Since 2005. But since November 2009 (31 months ago) prices are up 9.6 per cent.

My pension is worth less and less. I think I will be lucky if I retire at 75.

That's my target date now. remembering that I retired at 50 and then went back to work through boredom and then bought another house etc and took out another mortgage and sold my soul to the capitalist devil and now face a lifetime of poverty unless I work til I drop :ohwell

SimonMac
20th June 2012, 07:59
Since 2005. But since November 2009 (31 months ago) prices are up 9.6 per cent.

My pension is worth less and less. I think I will be lucky if I retire at 75.

I will be lucky to live to 75 with my families health history

BrilloPad
20th June 2012, 08:00
That's my target date now. remembering that I retired at 50 and then went back to work through boredom and then bought another house etc and took out another mortgage and sold my soul to the capitalist devil and now face a lifetime of poverty unless I work til I drop :ohwell

I thought you were aged 78 now? To retire at 75 are you building a time machine? :laugh

Seriously - I reckon sassy will end up back in work soon - shame he does not learn from you.....

BrilloPad
20th June 2012, 08:02
I will be lucky to live to 75 with my families health history

My step father-in-law had all his family die aged about 50. Mostly heart related. He is now 73 and lives on a diet of egg and chips getting almost no exercise.

There are probabilities - but that is all they are.

When I die this is how I want to go BBC News - Turtles fossilised in sex embrace (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18495102)

Doggy Styles
20th June 2012, 08:06
When I die this is how I want to go BBC News - Turtles fossilised in sex embrace (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18495102)Shagging a turtle?

ChimpMaster
20th June 2012, 08:06
My step father-in-law had all his family die aged about 50. Mostly heart related. He is now 73 and lives on a diet of egg and chips getting almost no exercise.

There are probabilities - but that is all they are.

When I die this is how I want to go BBC News - Turtles fossilised in sex embrace (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18495102)

You need to find a turtle first, and hope that it's willing.

MarillionFan
20th June 2012, 08:09
That's my target date now. remembering that I retired at 50 and then went back to work through boredom and then bought another house etc and took out another mortgage and sold my soul to the capitalist devil and now face a lifetime of poverty unless I work til I drop :ohwell

Annoying. I've got a song in my head now I was going to post but I don't know what it is. I think it has the lyrics 'Work all day long' or 'Work all night long'. It's like an 70s/80's song with a heavy beat and all I remember it goes 'Dum dum de dum dum dum All day long'.

Anyone name that tune?

ChimpMaster
20th June 2012, 08:12
When I was young(er), I thought I would retire at 35 with a residual income of £1k a month. But I was single, living with my parents, and naiive.

Then I thought maybe 40 - 45 (no I'm not quite that age yet); this was deduced when I was married, had a kid, bought my own home and had been contracting for a little while. To some extent 45 could still be achievable, but only if I could continue contracting at this pace/rate for another 5 years or so, but that is highly unlikely given the direction of my skillset and of the economy as a whole.

And recently, we've thought about private schooling the kids. Of course, when that ball starts rolling, you can't just put one kid in private education, you've got to do all 3.

And so, 45 is now a pipe dream and I think it's more likely I'll never stop working, especially as my income falls and expenses escalate.

Ho hum :frown :eyes

Doggy Styles
20th June 2012, 08:13
Annoying. I've got a song in my head now I was going to post but I don't know what it is. I think it has the lyrics 'Work all day long' or 'Work all night long'. It's like an 70s/80's song with a heavy beat and all I remember it goes 'Dum dum de dum dum dum All day long'.

Anyone name that tune?Is it "Sixteen Tons"? Here's the chorus but I'm not so sure now:

You load sixteen tons an' what do you get?
Another day older deeper and debt.
St Peter don't you call me I cause can't go:
I owe my soul to the company store.

MarillionFan
20th June 2012, 08:15
Is it "Sixteen Tons"? Here's the chorus but I'm not so sure now:

You load sixteen tons an' what do you get?
Another day older deeper and debt.
St Peter don't you call me I cause can't go:
I owe my soul to the company store.

Not even close.

Doggy Styles
20th June 2012, 08:18
When I was young(er), I thought I would retire at 35 with a residual income of £1k a month. But I was single, living with my parents, and naiive.

Then I thought maybe 40 - 45 (no I'm not quite that age yet); this was deduced when I was married, had a kid, bought my own home and had been contracting for a little while. To some extent 45 could still be achievable, but only if I could continue contracting at this pace/rate for another 5 years or so, but that is highly unlikely given the direction of my skillset and of the economy as a whole.

And recently, we've thought about private schooling the kids. Of course, when that ball starts rolling, you can't just put one kid in private education, you've got to do all 3.

And so, 45 is now a pipe dream and I think it's more likely I'll never stop working, especially as my income falls and expenses escalate.

Ho hum :frown :eyesStrangely I never planned early retirement. It doesn't concern me at the moment if I have to work beyond 65. I might actually prefer it. My dad was able to take early retirement, did a few things, then he got a bit nostalgic for his old job.

BrilloPad
20th June 2012, 08:21
all I remember it goes 'Dum dum de dum dum dum All day long'.

Anyone name that tune?

Is it the wheels on the bus?

:igmc:

SimonMac
20th June 2012, 08:28
Annoying. I've got a song in my head now I was going to post but I don't know what it is. I think it has the lyrics 'Work all day long' or 'Work all night long'. It's like an 70s/80's song with a heavy beat and all I remember it goes 'Dum dum de dum dum dum All day long'.

Anyone name that tune?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXd155v8Z5U

ChimpMaster
20th June 2012, 08:39
Strangely I never planned early retirement. It doesn't concern me at the moment if I have to work beyond 65. I might actually prefer it. My dad was able to take early retirement, did a few things, then he got a bit nostalgic for his old job.

Early retirement - with sufficient income - would allow me to focus on the more important things in life. I miss seeing my children, whom I barely spend an hour each evening. I don't get to meet up with friends enough, though I guess if they're working when I'm 'retired' it wouldn't be any better. I would also like to 'work' on something else of my own choosing, rather than just chasing the money.

Gonzo
20th June 2012, 09:33
From wiki

Wilson was much criticised for a broadcast in which he assured listeners that the "pound in your pocket" had not lost its value. It was widely forgotten that his next sentence had been "prices will rise".

It is that sort of attitude which caused the UK to go downhill until Maggie came along.Wilson was talking about the decision to devalue the £ - which has always been the standard British policy to deal with an economic down-turn, and still being used today.

ThomasSoerensen
20th June 2012, 09:45
We will all die at our desks. Now zip it and keep turning out those TPS reports.

Lockhouse
20th June 2012, 11:40
More QE for sure by next month if there's not already been a(nother) Euro crisis before then.

AtW
20th June 2012, 14:24
since 2005, prices in the UK are up 22.8 per cent.

:laugh

Prices on food easily doubled, same for gas, electric, petrol, diesel, taxes are up etc.

Bacchus
20th June 2012, 14:34
Annoying. I've got a song in my head now I was going to post but I don't know what it is. I think it has the lyrics 'Work all day long' or 'Work all night long'. It's like an 70s/80's song with a heavy beat and all I remember it goes 'Dum dum de dum dum dum All day long'.

Anyone name that tune?


I think it's "All night long" by Rainbow, but it goes Dum dum de dum dum, dum dum dah

BrilloPad
22nd June 2012, 08:46
:laugh

Prices on food easily doubled, same for gas, electric, petrol, diesel, taxes are up etc.

Yes. I went into co-op to buy a loaf of bread the other day. £1.49!!

At least petrol seems down a bit from about £1.40 to £1.30. But then that is probably bad news as it just reflects lack of global demand....

Sysman
22nd June 2012, 10:13
Wilson was talking about the decision to devalue the £ - which has always been the standard British policy to deal with an economic down-turn, and still being used today.

And that is a solid reason for hanging onto your own currency. Unlike Greece, Birtain kept that option.

Sysman
22nd June 2012, 10:21
Just think: there was a time when it was $4.00 to the £.

Hence "half a dollar" for the half crown (12.5p for the uninitiated).

Significantly that was during the war and for 5 years following it, when lots of Yanks were on this side of the pond.

And in spite of the higher value of the pound back then, they were still regarded as being rich. Hence that other phrase.

"Overpaid. Oversexed. Over 'ere."

Sysman
22nd June 2012, 11:19
Comparison of military and civilian pay in WWII by Barron's (http://www.usmm.org/barrons.html)

compared with

BBC - WW2 People's War - Never was So Much Owed to So Many Who Received So Little (http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/58/a2778258.shtml)

Ta for the links.

Which were a bit of an eye opener.

If I remember correctly my dad got 10 shillings a week in tje army, but he was still a teenager when he joined, and single.. Don't know whether he sent money back home or not.

Bill Barnes proabably had quite a good job in civvy street at 6 quid a week. When I got my very first holiday job (1971?) I managed to get 9 quid a week, but many of my schoolmates were only on a fiver.