PDA

View Full Version : How did you make the permie to contractor jump?



Old Greg
21st June 2012, 06:28
One of the hardest things about making the jump is that you ususally have hand in your notice at your permie job and then find a contract at the last minute - all a bit scary.

Anyway, I heard indirectly from an ex-permie who left under a bit of a cloud from my current gig - not fireed, but encouraged to move on. He's a nice enough guy, but an incompetent fantasist - think typical CUK poster but nice. He found a new permie job and handed in his notice. Hust before he started his new job, he found a contract and ditched his new job, which was always his intent. It's quite a nice (in a Macchiavellian kind of way) approach to de-risking the jump. You have something to go to if contracting doesn't work out. You're not pissing off your current employer, who you may need for a reference. The new employer is very unlikely to sue you when you drop out even if you've signed a contract (or perhaps they might in certain industries).

Anyone done this? I'm guessing some people go into contracting after redundancy. I was caught in an NHS merger and 50 people were going to be made redundant, so they were happy to see someone leave to reduce their redundancy bill.

Share your heart-warming story.

SupremeSpod
21st June 2012, 06:40
Completed my apprenticeship at Ferranti, I spent some time there helping a contractor debug some code, found out he was on 5* what I was earning.

I tendered my resignation and 4 weeks later started as a contractor. That was almost 26 years ago.

Doggy Styles
21st June 2012, 06:46
Redundancy then luck

doodab
21st June 2012, 06:53
I had my one and only permie job, I was getting pissed off with them so I applied for a few others on Jobserve, one of them using some niche technology that I had been working with, and got an offer of a contract (I had no idea what that meant until then) for 5x what I was earning and 4x what I was expecting. It was quite satisfying when my bosses boss, who wanted to try and keep me on, took me aside and asked me what they were paying me. When I told him his reply was "that's more than I get. Good luck!"

ChimpMaster
21st June 2012, 06:54
My hand was forced a little by circumstances. I was a consultant for a software vendor and used to travel a lot for assignments, many months at a time away from home.

I got married and bought a house, and was then assigned to work 200 miles away on an assignment that would last a year. No chance, especially after many years of living out of a suitcase, and having been very recently married and moving into my new home.

The consulting manager/director was a class one d1ck so the only option for me was to resign - which was difficult as I was giving up a lot, including a 100k package :ohwell

Luckily I found a contract where the client was prepared to wait 4 weeks for me, and I negotiated my permie notice down to that from 3 months.

The irony is that the contract was still some 100 odd miles away from home, so I had to live out for those 6 months anyway. My wife travelled decided to move with me and travel back to work in London every day (2.5 hours each way on trains!). But I was doing it on my own terms so was happier.

8 years later and I've done OK. This is my final year of contracting (for now) but I have few regrets.

Sysman
21st June 2012, 06:56
Nice fat redundancy cheque and they found me a lucrative contract before my official end date.

Scrag Meister
21st June 2012, 06:58
Been looking to do it for years but Ex-Mrs Scrag Meister wouldn't move anywhere. :mad
My kids were young straight after the divorce so stayed around the area for them for some years. :talk::spank:
Moved to London with Perm-Employer. :banana:
Boredom at permie role. :ind
Death of my grandmother (££ facilitation) Thanks Grandma :(
Quit with nothing to go to, but contracting in mind. :eek
3 months looking, first contract.:smile
Never looked back. :D

Sysman
21st June 2012, 07:07
It was quite satisfying when my bosses boss, who wanted to try and keep me on, took me aside and asked me what they were paying me. When I told him his reply was "that's more than I get. Good luck!"

I bumped into a former boss after I'd been contracting for a year and he couldn't resist telling me that most contractors pack it in after a couple of years.

He also assumed that I was on standard bum on seat rates and told me that it was "an awful ot of money". I didn't tell the condescending twat that I had been on considerably more than that.

I forgot to tell him about the tax free bit.. :D

bless 'em all
21st June 2012, 07:08
Spent the best part of 18 months benched at a large telecoms co. Jumped at a generous redundancy and hit the bench Jan '01 2007.

It took me less than two months to find a gig and I have invoiced someone for something every month from day 1.

Support Monkey
21st June 2012, 07:28
moved to another permie job and it was me and one other fella who was a contractor, he rolled in at 9 and left at 4 for a day rate way beyond anything i had ever earned or was likely to earn, he was rinsing the job, after a few conversations with him my mind was made up.

As i had only just started i was on 3 months probation with a weeks notice, just before that came to an end i went on holiday, discussed with wife (we had 2 small children and 1 large mortgage at the time) she said leave it a bit see how thing go i said if i leave it i will have a months notice before i can leave, so i came back from holidays handed me notice in on the Monday interviewed on wedneday and started Thursday, never even finished my weeks notice and never looked back.

Thinking about it now after 7 years of pay rises i would probably be earning around £26000 a year if i had stuck with it :laugh

NotAllThere
21st June 2012, 07:29
...think typical CUK poster but nice...I tried that and my head exploded. Messy.

I was in a crap job, half client consultancy, and half helpdesk. Despite clearing 90% of the helpdesk issues myself, and being the only person who was prepared to deal with the half singporean half welsh lady who was head of IT at Islywn Borough Council, management insisted I wasn't a "team player", since I wasn't in at 8am, and left before 6pm. That was six months in. I resigned a week later, worked out my notice of four weeks, spent three weeks looking for a contract (thankfully buffered by a previous redundancy payment), and never looked back.

Except when I dipped into permie for a year to get SAP skills. And then in 2000 did management for five years until I got sick of the politics.

scooby
21st June 2012, 07:34
Fell out of love with company after being asked to run a project to central 2nd line support team, make my own team redundant and with no promises on me having a role afterwards. Handed in my notice and due to SC clearance and ex Army was snapped up in 3 wks by a competitor on a joint project with employer.

Due to working on sensitive contracts, once i made this known and that the competitor would wait 7 more weeks for me, I was then lead downstairs and escorted off site with full pay till the end of notice.

That was Thursday, and I started contracting on the Monday 7 weeks earlier than planned! :)

my reasons to jump were also not helped by the 7 contractors in my team and the timesheets and invoices i had to sign weekly!! :laugh

FiveTimes
21st June 2012, 07:51
I've drifted in and out of contracting, but it started in 2002 when made redundant, had couple of months off and then bagged a nice contract. This last 18 months followed by a few other gigs.
I've drifted back to the dark side a few times, mainly as mrs 5* doesn't like the idea of me not earning.

Netraider
21st June 2012, 07:54
Redundancy then luck

WHS

oscarose
21st June 2012, 07:57
At the time, lifestyle of excess needed additional funding.

Never looked back.

HTH

:o

MyUserName
21st June 2012, 08:01
Got made redundant last year, took a linux job after being reasssured that linux knowledge was not required. A new CEO took over who thought linux knowledge was required who told me that I was going to fail my probation period regardless of what I did (despite the fact that my manager wanted to keep me), forced me to sign a document which we established was factually incorrect but was told I would be fired on the spot if I did not sign it.

I signed it as at that moment I had a mortgage, debt, a daughter and a pregnant wife and could not afford to lose the income.

We had been told that my son might be born with genetic complications which could be fatal (possibly a 1 in 4 chance of death) and they had very little extra information to give so I decided I needed money in case we had to have specialist treatment.

I got another perm job (almost got a contract but got beaten at the post as they were in the process of offering it. After a month I was offered another contract and took it - had to leave my perm job after a month which was a shame as I liked everyone there.

Gonzo
21st June 2012, 08:07
I had to give three months notice to leave my permie job so I resigned with no contract lined up.

I finished my permie job, still with no contract.

Three months after leaving my permie job I started my first contract.

After that I was lucky.

alreadypacked
21st June 2012, 08:08
I don't remember, must be getting old :o

garethevans1986
21st June 2012, 08:26
Worked perm for firm A for 6 months, didnt turn out as what they said it was in the interview (but good dev team etc), still in my probation so only had to give 1 weeks notice - accepted a contract on thursday night for client B, gave notice friday morning, agent phones back saying they need somebody to start next (wednesday at the latest), left same day, started in Client B on Monday.

Contracted for 6 months to Client B, perm fellas were absolutley useless, Firm A then offers me 6 month contract work so left Client B and then contracted with Firm A - low rate but easy 25 drive to work, know everybody here, not done too much in the past 2-3 months, project has been delayed (not due to me) so contract will be extended and rate increased ;-)

Loving every minute of it.

GE

BoredBloke
21st June 2012, 08:34
Went to school
Went to Uni
Went contracting

Never had a proper job!

Paddy
21st June 2012, 08:45
I made the move to contract work just to shut up the pimps from phoning me and pestering me to go contracting.

BTW, the clalls did not stop and I was persuaded to jump ship the first week, that was the best move ever and to a very lucrative one.

Cliphead
21st June 2012, 08:50
Drifted into IT after uni by doing dev jobs for small companies mostly via people I knew / word of mouth and building a reputation. After a couple of years doing that I fired off CV's to some agencies looking for a permie role, first call from an agent asked me if I'd consider a short contract which I took and never looked back after that.

escapeUK
21st June 2012, 08:56
My permie MD gave me the final straw on a Friday, I quit Monday. Had a month relaxing, then a catchup e-mail to a contact got me 18 months of work.

I had enough money to live for 4 years in the bank when I quit, so it didnt seem scary at all. More relieved to get out of a situation I had hated for years.

Lockhouse
21st June 2012, 09:04
Was permie for four years, worked my way up from junior op to systems administrator. Purse strings got pulled, all the ops left and I was put back on shift and asked to take a pay cut. Quit (threw my toys out of pram, ripped phone off wall etc).

Walked back to my desk and the phone rang "Have you ever thought if going contracting?" Went from £8000 per year to £650 per week. That was over 25 years ago.

SimonMac
21st June 2012, 09:07
Was not working at the time, I applied for a contract and a permie job, was offered both, took the contract and never looked back

Mich the Tester
21st June 2012, 09:12
Worked for a couple of consultancies for about six years, got trained up in DBA work and testing, and on my last project as a permie I was hired out to Accidenture who charged their clientco some loony rate like 1500 euros a day, paid my boss 800 euros a day and I was left with a salary of about 2500 euros a month plus travel costs and a room in one of the world's tuliptiest hotels where the bed had three legs and a cupboard collapsed on top of me during the night thanks to the vibrations from the fat trucker in the next room with his rent boy. I chatted to my Account Manager suggesting I'd found a better place to sleep that was cheaper, but there was no flexibility at all and I was told 'if you're so bloody clever go and run your own business'. So I did; I built up a network, enough savings to live for 3 months and saved up lots of holidays and as soon as the project was over I started making phone calls within my own network. Handed in resignation after a week in the office having found a contract, took all my holidays and left.

Unfortunately the very next day the turbo blew up on my car, costing me 1500 euros in repairs and car hire and the bloody washing machine gave up the ghost. I spent the first two months of contracting sleeping in one of the country's worst B&Bs and making myself sandwiches from the local Aldi, only going home at weekends. Then when the first invoice was paid I booked into the Amstel Hotel for a night, had a bloody good meal in La Rive with Lady Tester and bought her a Miele the next day, which does not break down. A month later I ordered a new car, and at the end of my contract 6 months later I had more savings than I'd ever dreamt of, a new contract on a higher rate and a lifestyle that made me feel like a millionaire.

NorthWestPerm2Contr
21st June 2012, 09:20
Those of you who have read my posts often like to have a go at me for me constant jumping ship nature.... Well here is a bit of background to it all:

-First job at telco for 18 months
-Second job at small insurance firm for just over 2 years

I tend to get bored after 6-9 months especially when there is jack all to do... I had to put up with second job due to recession and was dying to get into contracting for about a 9 months before I finally landed that first contract. Initially told client I was available immediately but then told them 3 weeks. I was starting to go insane in permie land and am so happy I left that dark world...

I am definitely much more suited to contracting as I get bored quickly with most contracts. I am starting to look for longer-term roles now though so am becoming very picky with the role...

Mich the Tester
21st June 2012, 09:27
I tend to get bored after 6-9 months especially when there is jack all to do... I had to put up with second job due to recession and was dying to get into contracting for about a 9 months before I finally landed that first contract. Initially told client I was available immediately but then told them 3 weeks. I was starting to go insane in permie land and am so happy I left that dark world...

I am definitely much more suited to contracting as I get bored quickly with most contracts. I am starting to look for longer-term roles now though so am becoming very picky with the role...

I'm like that. Never wanted to stick around for a long time. What really gets my goat is when some HR numpty at an agent starts suggesting that lots of short contracts is a bad thing as I don't stay somewhere for more than 6 months or so. I often have to explain politely that I like to work on a project until it's finished and then move to a 'new challenge' and that if they phone my old project managers they'll find that I stick at it until the job's done and get results. Sometimes I'd actually like to grap them by the scruff of the neck and shout in their ears 'listen I'm a f**king contractor and not a permie; I don't do this to make friends, join the Clientco Personnel Glee Club and get a cheap watch after 40 years service or get upgraded to a 2 litre Vectra and a parking space next to the HR manager, I do it for money so I can go home after work and enjoy the one and only life I've got instead of wasting it as a corporate drone, alright?'

JohannM
21st June 2012, 09:29
Had a perm job back home (not UK) for 8 years, went for a holiday in Aus, landed a contract unexpectedly for 4 months, 2 months travelling from the money I made, started to love contracting, went to Ireland to meet some friends before going back home, got offered a 6 week contract out of the blues, small co wanted something to go live pretty quickly, loved contracting much more, spent 3 years in Ireland, after that got offered a job in Brussels, 3 years down the road now and still going strong :)

NotAllThere
21st June 2012, 09:33
..Went from £8000 per year to £650 per week. That was over 25 years ago.So that's about £32K? 4x increase. I only went from £20K to £60K (1995).

BoredBloke
21st June 2012, 09:49
So that's about £32K? 4x increase. I only went from £20K to £60K (1995).

I went from nothing (uni) to 30k (contracting) back in 91 when I started working. I did some seriously cr@p roles, all over the place to build up my skill set. In 2.5 years I lived in Aberdeen, Swindon, Bournemouth, Tunbridge Wells and Leeds. I started on a helpdesk, then did desktop support for a few years before getting into the VBA rubbish that currently pays my bills!

norrahe
21st June 2012, 10:41
Bored at permie gig,
Had some dosh after selling house in London,
Went travelling,
Trained as a chef for fun, ran a catering business briefly,
Did some more travelling
And after a year or so decided to look for work again, fell into contracting.

Gibbon
21st June 2012, 10:47
I was on a RAF software team when I came across my first subby, I decided there and then that’s what I wanted to be. Went to college and gleaned as much knowledge as I could. I had to put 18 months notice in or pretend I was gay but didn’t have the balls for that. Took a permie job at first to get some commercial experience in and left after a year. That was 12 years ago, never looked back.

hyperD
21st June 2012, 11:12
Worked in Oil & Gas as Process Engineer then focussed on software dev inside the industry. Realised it was niche, waited for redundancy, jumped into first contract after three days leaving clientco.

Then mostly fixed priced work to original clientco and others in similar industry without needing Dodgy Agent.

SeekingIT
21st June 2012, 14:35
Back in 2001, thought I was the business, £25k, laptop, Co. Car & phone, permy at CompLand. Got sent to C&W, troubleshooting /support etc....Found out chap I reported to was on £461 per day.:freaky:

Needless to say this readjusted my thinking, as I was as qualified as him (IMHO). did some research on contracting, knocked up me CV, got agents calling everyday............Had to give 4 weeks notice, as CompLand had been good to me, didn't want to do dirty and walk.........:yay:

In between the 4 weeks notice, bottom fell out of market - was looking for 2.5 months, had budgeted for 3 months.......then out of blue agent called, first gig........was at Client for 4.5 years...:)

Never looked back, interview yesterday, awaiting result hopefully today.....:eek

Scrag Meister
21st June 2012, 15:37
I went from nothing (uni) to 30k (contracting) back in 91 when I started working. I did some seriously cr@p roles, all over the place to build up my skill set. In 2.5 years I lived in Aberdeen, Swindon, Bournemouth, Tunbridge Wells and Leeds. I started on a helpdesk, then did desktop support for a few years before getting into the VBA rubbish that currently pays my bills!

How can you say VBA rubbish!! :D

The BASIC language of different flavours has paid my bills both perm and contract for 25 years.

d000hg
21st June 2012, 15:44
I was already working 20 hours a week on the side on a remote contract, dithering whether to go for it full-time or not... the $50/hr I was earning seemed like a fortune compared to a £27k salary.

Then I got fired and it forced my hand... I'm glad.

zara_backdog
21st June 2012, 20:05
Redundancy then luck

Same here!

MarillionFan
21st June 2012, 20:10
I was born a contractor. I came out clutching a timesheet. :smile

Cliphead
21st June 2012, 20:15
I was born a contractor. I came out clutching a script. :smile

:spel

hyperD
21st June 2012, 20:42
I was born a contractor. I came out clutching a timesheet. :smile

I was born an engineer. I came out sh1tting a clutch.

VirtualMonkey
22nd June 2012, 07:26
spent eight years working for a well known high street electrical retailer.
got promoted through the ranks and ended up tech lead on transformation project to upgrade NT4 to something new.
10months into the project a decision still hadn't been made as to which OS to go to so that, along with not liking my new team structure, forced me out.
Was very sad to leave...especially as my wife was pregnant at the time.
Have never looked back though and have had significant extensions on all but one contract...and that one was because they offered me perm.

Love it and would not likely go back to perm again.

Mich the Tester
22nd June 2012, 07:41
It seems most of us were permies for some time before either seeing the light or being thrown into the light by redundancy. Right now, there's a young guy I know from the rugby club who's nearly finished college and wants to work 'in IT' so he's asking me for advice. I'm really inclined to push him down the contracting route seeing as I see more contract vacancies than permie vacancies for junior testers or programmers here in NL. Of course, he'd be right in at the deep end and he'd have to sink or swim (although I can probably give him some guidance on the phone here and there).

Thing is, would I be advising that simply because I often wish that I'd gone contracting right from the start? Is it rally feasible to go it alone before getting some experience of corporate cack (politics, getting the tulip job of maintaining some old permie's spaghetti code etc) ? What do the panel think?

Scrag Meister
22nd June 2012, 09:01
It seems most of us were permies for some time before either seeing the light or being thrown into the light by redundancy. Right now, there's a young guy I know from the rugby club who's nearly finished college and wants to work 'in IT' so he's asking me for advice. I'm really inclined to push him down the contracting route seeing as I see more contract vacancies than permie vacancies for junior testers or programmers here in NL. Of course, he'd be right in at the deep end and he'd have to sink or swim (although I can probably give him some guidance on the phone here and there).

Thing is, would I be advising that simply because I often wish that I'd gone contracting right from the start? Is it rally feasible to go it alone before getting some experience of corporate cack (politics, getting the tulip job of maintaining some old permie's spaghetti code etc) ? What do the panel think?

Perm sets you up with the skills. So I would recommend a perm role for a few years to get that under his belt.

Old Hack
22nd June 2012, 09:20
I always planned to go Contracting from the start. I stayed with an industry leader whilst I learned my niche skills, then once I believed I had enough for the open market, I went contracting. All through Uni that was my target. I don't think I am made of the permie stuff as I get too bored. I also like the challenge of getting new work every time a project ends, as it keeps the pipes clean. Once I tire of the contracting life, I will simply join the public sector, as they like employing old people...

Mich the Tester
22nd June 2012, 09:22
I always planned to go Contracting from the start. I stayed with an industry leader whilst I learned my niche skills, then once I believed I had enough for the open market, I went contracting. All through Uni that was my target. I don't think I am made of the permie stuff as I get too bored. I also like the challenge of getting new work every time a project ends, as it keeps the pipes clean. Once I tire of the contracting life, I will simply join the public sector, as they like employing old people...

Be careful; in my experience the public sector prefers employing zombies to old people.

bless 'em all
22nd June 2012, 09:39
Perm sets you up with the skills. So I would recommend a perm role for a few years to get that under his belt.

And it pays for the training, you need ISEB/ISTQB Foundation to get past most sorts for testing jobs these days.

I did 7 years permie jumping from project to project and taking in as much as I could. I consider it my apprentice years served.

SimonMac
22nd June 2012, 09:40
I was born a contractor. I came out wetting the bed as I did. :smile

FTFY

Scoobos
22nd June 2012, 09:43
In answer to the OP, I didn't jump I was pushed .

Contracted in Canada as it was my only option, returned to UK wanting a short term assignment before I went to Australia , and was told that B2B was all anyone would do and that Sole Trading was not an option.

I think I'm one of the few that resents having to do all this paperwork / accountancy / ltd stuff, but I have no option unless I want to try and take full time roles (to which I'm not suited).

Mich the Tester
22nd June 2012, 09:45
And it pays for the training, you need ISEB/ISTQB Foundation to get past most sorts for testing jobs these days.


You can pass Foundation by reading one book and doing the exam. Unless you're a moron, in which case you could probably pass without reading the book.

bless 'em all
22nd June 2012, 09:51
You can pass Foundation by reading one book and doing the exam. Unless you're a moron, in which case you could probably pass without reading the book.

You can pass the entire ISTQB exam set without ever seeing a computer, let alone actually doing the job.

Who would you rather have on your team, a 'qualified' tester with 3 years exerience or an 'un-qualified' one with 10+ years?

lukemg
22nd June 2012, 09:53
1993 - Drifted into IT after Poly, job came from sandwich course placement co. Did a lot of euro travelling, US trip etc networks just starting to be used, email only for senior mgrs etc.
Offered a promotion in 'shipping' as IT was still not considered a real job. Contract draughtsman on site says go contracting, his dad was an accountant with IT bods on his books.
At the time, it was Freelance Informer and bounce your CV using a Fax machine to the agency contact numbers !!
Offered a contract in Brum, stayed with friends of friends in shared house during the week. Pay tripled over night. Started 10 year continuous run before ass fell out of my meagre skills. 2.5 years perm (pay halved) to 'reboot'. Back on the contract train for 6 years now (with about a year bench time all added up).
Yearly revenue graph looks like the worlds scariest roller-coaster but still certain it was the right idea with 2 caveats:
1 - Don't expect to flog the same horse forever, you can be left with worthless skills very quickly. You may not even notice if you are on a long contract until you get tumbleweeds when looking again. Update if you can !
2 - Always be thinking about a plan B. Mine is stashing a decent portion in investments. Good warchest if needed, pension if not...

FiveTimes
22nd June 2012, 09:53
It seems most of us were permies for some time before either seeing the light or being thrown into the light by redundancy. Right now, there's a young guy I know from the rugby club who's nearly finished college and wants to work 'in IT' so he's asking me for advice. I'm really inclined to push him down the contracting route seeing as I see more contract vacancies than permie vacancies for junior testers or programmers here in NL. Of course, he'd be right in at the deep end and he'd have to sink or swim (although I can probably give him some guidance on the phone here and there).

Thing is, would I be advising that simply because I often wish that I'd gone contracting right from the start? Is it rally feasible to go it alone before getting some experience of corporate cack (politics, getting the tulip job of maintaining some old permie's spaghetti code etc) ? What do the panel think?

How about seeing if current client is looking for junior testers and offer to supply one ? That way you give the lad a leg up and also make a few quid along the way ?

Mich the Tester
22nd June 2012, 09:53
You can pass the entire ISTQB exam set without ever seeing a computer, let alone actually doing the job.

Who would you rather have on your team, a 'qualified' tester with 3 years exerience or an 'un-qualified' one with 10+ years?

A tester who's done or doing Cem Kaner's BBST course.

Mich the Tester
22nd June 2012, 09:54
How about seeing if current client is looking for junior testers and offer to supply one ? That way you give the lad a leg up and also make a few quid along the way ?

Yep,, thought about that, but he's not available until September; after his exams he's quite rightly sodding off to the beach for a couple of months to get laid and enjoy life.

kanulondon
22nd June 2012, 11:59
After Uni I fell into IT (I studied Env Engineering) and stayed with a large High St bank for 6 years. I came up through their graduate training scheme working my way up from Support Analyst >Technical Team Leader > Team Leader > IT Manager (without the official grade!). Made some sideways moves in a bid to get formal management grade. However it was a bit of an old boys club. Resentment started to set in and I was keen to leave

I had a couple of contractors in my team and after deciding it was the best option for me, I went about getting all of the formal qualifications needed (to give me an extra advantage). Got my Prince 2 Project MGT & ITIL V2 Manager's all paid for by my company (they didn't twig at all). I then started the search for the job, got the first contract after about a month of looking and handed in notice. Felt a bit bad, because I carried out looking and found an even better contract paying nearly £100 per day more. So I made my excuses and started work on my first gig Feb 2009.

Best deicision I made career wise. . . . . .

I've been fortunate to have not been on the bench as yet and I'm on my 4th Client. At the time of my first give I increased income by about x4. Market has slowed a little bit, so I am probably only on x3 now (taking into account permie rises) but it's making such a difference for me and my family.

Not sure I will be gigging forever, but for the next 5 - 10 years . . . I will look to continue

Since starting, I've continued to keep up my studies and stay fresh. This is so important in the fast moving world of IT, but it requires time and discipline

DS23
22nd June 2012, 12:13
Redundancy then luck

whs

9 years of it. luck?

Jog On
22nd June 2012, 12:19
I got a perm gig at a security company (ADT) where they had a 6 month probation period in which the notice period was just 1 week. Was there for a month or so before getting my first contract.

DaveB
22nd June 2012, 14:21
First time: got pissed of with permie role, started looking for a new job and got an offer of a contract and decided to go for it. They even awaited 2 months for me to start. (Thanks BT! :) )

Second Time: Had a longish spell on the bench after a few years, just as the recession was starting to bite, and MrsB wanted me to go back permie so picked up a new permie role. 2 years later I was thoroughly pissed off with it when I got made redundant. They handed me a nice fat bonus, told me I'd get a decent redundancy payment and I had a new contract lined up within a week of being told it was happening :D

d000hg
22nd June 2012, 14:26
I'm really inclined to push him down the contracting route seeing as I see more contract vacancies than permie vacancies for junior testers or programmers here in NLWhy would anyone hire a contractor with no experience when there are cheap experienced people around? Unless he charges a truly pitiful rate, in which case he might as well get a proper job to get some training and learn how the world actually works outside of university! Maybe switch jobs a couple of times quickly to maximise experience and then try contracting.

Scrag Meister
22nd June 2012, 14:29
First time: got pissed of with permie role, started looking for a new job and got an offer of a contract and decided to go for it. They even awaited 2 months for me to start. (Thanks BT! :) )

Second Time: Had a longish spell on the bench after a few years, just as the recession was starting to bite, and MrsB wanted me to go back permie so picked up a new permie role. 2 years later I was thoroughly pissed off with it when I got made redundant. They handed me a nice fat bonus, told me I'd get a decent redundancy payment and I had a new contract lined up within a week of being told it was happening :D

Back in permie world, I was waiting in the car to go in to an interview for a new role at a new employer, when I was rung by a colleague to tell me that we were being made redundant from current employer.

2 week over-lap, work during consultation period, of course. :D

Was a rubbish redundancy pay-off though.

Mich the Tester
22nd June 2012, 14:31
Why would anyone hire a contractor with no experience when there are cheap experienced people around?

Believe it or not, it's happening, because they'll happily work for half the rate of someone with experience.

DaveB
22nd June 2012, 14:38
Why would anyone hire a contractor with no experience when there are cheap experienced people around? Unless he charges a truly pitiful rate, in which case he might as well get a proper job to get some training and learn how the world actually works outside of university! Maybe switch jobs a couple of times quickly to maximise experience and then try contracting.

A pitiful rate for a qualified, experienced contractor is a bloody fortune to a newly graduated student with debts to pay off.

BillHicksRIP
22nd June 2012, 21:01
I've worked as a permie for a few consultanicies and done stints at client sites where they were me charging me out at £850 - £1000 a day plus hotels and food. The odd client permie would have a dig about rates as they were obviously privy to what was being invoiced, but it wasn't the best situation on a personal level. Now I'm competing with my old companies but charging about half what they do. I do enjoy not having some manager telling me to work 300 miles away for weeks at a time when I can decide when to do that myself. :-)