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wurzel
9th August 2012, 09:29
For the resident cycling experts...

I need a new bike. Been riding a hybrid for the last few years but thinking of getting a road bike as I'm fed up of being overtaken on the morning commute & I want to go quicker. There are some fitness issues here too but wtf.
I also do quite a bit of riding for fun at weekends doing about 50 - 100 miles on a Saturday.

Quite tempted on one of these:

http://cdn1.media.cyclingnews.futurecdn.net/2010/06/28/2/img_0007_600.jpg

I'll be doing quite a bit of mileage on bumpy country lanes & apparently this style frame is perfect for soaking up the bumps, according to the salesman. My only reservation is with the lifespan of the graphite frame. I've heard that cracks can develop after a relatively short period of time.

Anyone got any recommendations? Don't want to spend more than £1.5k. TIA.

Robinho
9th August 2012, 09:33
Try and get one with wheels if you can.

SimonMac
9th August 2012, 09:38
BBC Sport - Cycling - Chris Hoy's track bike guide (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/other_sports/cycling/get_involved/4763500.stm)

Notascooby
9th August 2012, 09:46
If you can find a bike shop that will do a generic bike fit first, then they can recommend a frame based upon what would fit, rather than what looks good.

Also worth having a look at planet-x bikes. They can't be beaten on price and I've had a number of their bikes, worth signing up for their news letter as you find they have big reductions and you can find yourself buying a full price bike only to see it being sold £500 cheaper the next week.

In the mid-range market there are a huge number of bikes, have a look at what components they are selling, a lot will have a 50/34 chain ring when you'll want a 53/39 if you're semi-serious.

You'll want a SRAM force or Shimano ultegra but you may find some cheaper 105 or Sopra stuff on the lower spec'd bikes.

Also worth looking to see if anyone local is upgrading their bike, lots of people buy a £1500 bike only to get a bit serious and then spend that on the frame alone, so see if a local cycling club has a for sale section on their website.

doomage
9th August 2012, 09:54
Try and get one with wheels if you can.

Perfectly round ones are the best.

Malcolm Buggeridge
9th August 2012, 10:11
How about a unicycle?

Seriously though, I went recumbent some 10 years back and I haven't looked back.

Pondlife
9th August 2012, 10:28
How about a unicycle?

Seriously though, I went recumbent some 10 years back and I haven't looked back.

Why don't you just ask admin to reset the Gricer password if you can't remember it. :confused:

TestMangler
9th August 2012, 10:49
Get a Honda Fireblade mate. Much easier to get up these hills.

Dallas
9th August 2012, 11:28
>>I'm fed up of being overtaken on the morning commute

your bike is only as fast as your legs, the time saving/speed is quite minimal over distance really. I can overtake these on a fold-up.

Go for a BMX then man up to a TT and do some proper racing.

BrilloPad
9th August 2012, 12:38
>>I'm fed up of being overtaken on the morning commute

your bike is only as fast as your legs, the time saving/speed is quite minimal over distance really. I can overtake these on a fold-up.

Go for a BMX then man up to a TT and do some proper racing.

+1. Depending on commute distance and the road conditions. Personally I need a racer for the first 6 miles and mountain bike for the last 6.

And when are YOU going to man up? :eyes And don't quote that iron woman stuff at me....

mudskipper
9th August 2012, 14:15
For the resident cycling experts...

I need a new bike. Been riding a hybrid for the last few years but thinking of getting a road bike as I'm fed up of being overtaken on the morning commute & I want to go quicker. There are some fitness issues here too but wtf.
I also do quite a bit of riding for fun at weekends doing about 50 - 100 miles on a Saturday.

Quite tempted on one of these:

http://cdn1.media.cyclingnews.futurecdn.net/2010/06/28/2/img_0007_600.jpg

I'll be doing quite a bit of mileage on bumpy country lanes & apparently this style frame is perfect for soaking up the bumps, according to the salesman. My only reservation is with the lifespan of the graphite frame. I've heard that cracks can develop after a relatively short period of time.

Anyone got any recommendations? Don't want to spend more than £1.5k. TIA.

Looks nice. But it's going to be embarrassing when Brillo and Dallas whizz past you on their fold-ups - best to stick to something that doesn't look like it should be going fast. ;)

wurzel
9th August 2012, 14:20
Looks nice. But it's going to be embarrassing when Brillo and Dallas whizz past you on their fold-ups - best to stick to something that doesn't look like it should be going fast. ;)

Yes, good point. Maybe I should get up to speed on one of those indoor trainers before I go out and embarrass myself.

hyperD
9th August 2012, 14:21
I've got a Specialized Secteur Apex Elite with Fulcrum 7 racing wheels and ceramic cogs. Costs ~ £1,300 and I do 8,000 miles/year in rush-hour.

'Tis very good.

wurzel
9th August 2012, 14:58
I've got a Specialized Secteur Apex Elite with Fulcrum 7 racing wheels and ceramic cogs. Costs ~ £1,300 and I do 8,000 miles/year in rush-hour.

'Tis very good.

Hmm.. the one I'm looking at is a Specialised Roubaix (can't remember the exact spec) but it's on for £1200 & they'll let me have it for £900.

Of course, with my level of fitness (which isn't bad) whether or not spending the extra on this as opposed to getting something for about £500 actually shows any performance gains remains to be seen. Other posters seem to suggest not.

May just as well pop into Halfords :eyes

Dallas
9th August 2012, 15:00
+1. Depending on commute distance and the road conditions. Personally I need a racer for the first 6 miles and mountain bike for the last 6.

And when are YOU going to man up? :eyes And don't quote that iron woman stuff at me....

Just coz someone today learned what a smackdown is :talk:

Notascooby
9th August 2012, 15:04
If you get a folding bike -

A) you look like a tit

There is no B)

You pay more for better components, so whilst the frame might be very similar, you'll get better brakes, wheels, gears etc.

The advantage of going in at the £500 range is if you do want to take cycling seriously, then you can throw that bike on the indoor trainer and buy a flash bike for £2k+

Then you can buy new wheels at £1K+

Then you can buy a power meter for £1k etc etc

This is a reasonable bike and you'll be hard pushed to find a better component spec for the price PX bike (http://www.planet-x-bikes.co.uk/i/q/FBPXPRORIV12/planet_x_pro_carbon_rival_road_bike_2012)

Dallas
9th August 2012, 15:10
If you get a folding bike -

A) you look like a tit

There is no B)

You pay more for better components, so whilst the frame might be very similar, you'll get better brakes, wheels, gears etc.

The advantage of going in at the £500 range is if you do want to take cycling seriously, then you can throw that bike on the indoor trainer and buy a flash bike for £2k+

Then you can buy new wheels at £1K+

Then you can buy a power meter for £1k etc etc

This is a reasonable bike and you'll be hard pushed to find a better component spec for the price PX bike (http://www.planet-x-bikes.co.uk/i/q/FBPXPRORIV12/planet_x_pro_carbon_rival_road_bike_2012)

Not suggesting he gets a foldup, just implying the speed gains will be minimal with the same power output :tongue

I got a foldup because my road and TT are too blinged up to leave on the streets of the old smoke, something to consider when you buy a flash one is security considerations.

I dont care what I look like as I am overtaking you :devil

Notascooby
9th August 2012, 15:32
Depends on the gearing you have. If your brompton has a 53/11 then fair enough but I think the dinky wheels may be a factor too.

Thankfully I can leave my bike(s) in a car park at my current gig and regularly commute on both my road a TT bikes (TT if extending the commute).

I assume you know of It’s Not A Race (http://www.itsnotarace.org/)

Suppose its the wrong forum for a bike porn thread....shame as my CD0.1 looks nice...will be even better with new Mavic Cosmic Carbone SLR wheels :cool1:

Dallas
9th August 2012, 15:47
Depends on the gearing you have. If your brompton has a 53/11 then fair enough but I think the dinky wheels may be a factor too.

Thankfully I can leave my bike(s) in a car park at my current gig and regularly commute on both my road a TT bikes (TT if extending the commute).

I assume you know of It’s Not A Race (http://www.itsnotarace.org/)

Suppose its the wrong forum for a bike porn thread....shame as my CD0.1 looks nice...will be even better with new Mavic Cosmic Carbone SLR wheels :cool1:

I saw the CD0.1 in Evans with adamo saddles and the staff were clueless! In the Republic of east London I wouldnt make the end of the street on that or mine in civilised hours (felt b2pro - Bing Images (http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=felt+b2pro+&view=detail&id=623100A4813FA9DC69D7D95565F65F89E0DFF10B&FORM=IDFRIR)) .

Mine is not even a brompton: Btwin - Hoptown 5 Eden - BIKES / BICYCLES / CYCLES bikes town bike - Designed for REGULAR journeys and easy space-saving storage. (Ideal for use in the public transport). (http://www.btwincycle.com/EN/hoptown-5-eden-170732040/#infos-techniques)

Smaller wheels = twitchier

any how we are off topic - sorry OP

Notascooby
9th August 2012, 16:17
Nice frame - had my heart set on a DA for years then they lauched the DA, DA2, DA3 buy a whole bike thing and I couldn't justify it.

I bought the frame from Evans as it was 55% off and got it built somewhere else.

aaaaany way....

Dallas
9th August 2012, 17:06
Gordon Ramsey has a DA :wink

still want one ...

hyperD
9th August 2012, 17:54
Hmm.. the one I'm looking at is a Specialised Roubaix (can't remember the exact spec) but it's on for £1200 & they'll let me have it for £900.

Of course, with my level of fitness (which isn't bad) whether or not spending the extra on this as opposed to getting something for about £500 actually shows any performance gains remains to be seen. Other posters seem to suggest not.

May just as well pop into Halfords :eyes

I'm no cycling aficionado, but I first did my daily 30 mile total commute using a cheap £300 mountain bike. After a month my knees were killing me and all I kept thinking about was titanium kneecaps.

Once I got the Secteur, all the pain went away. My posture on the bike was better, the bike was much, much lighter and my time went from 1hr 10 mins to 40 mins.

You could just pick up a cheap bike from eBay etc and try it out. If you need better/faster/easier then invest in a lighter road bike, although you need to make sure your prostate is in fine working order as sans suspension, it will take a hammering.

I tried one of those £3,500+ bikes and oh my, they are fantastic, but way out of my budget.

DaveB
9th August 2012, 18:20
I'm currently doing 30m / day in London on a £400 mtb. The biggest problem is the gearing is wrong for road riding. I can beat 90% of people in the 0-20 sprint from the lights, but after that the proper road bikes catchup again as I run out of gears.

If you are riding in London I *wouldn't* spend vast amounts on a bike for the commute. Too much risk of it getting trashed. Even with insurance you don't want to see your £1500 carbon frame reduced to splinters under a white van. That coupled with the stop start nature of riding in London means you won't get the best out of it.

Take a look at the guys going past you, what are they riding? There are a few flash carbon jobs out there but the majority will be on cheaper alu or steel frames. The single speed brigade in particular favour steel frames as they are much better at soaking up the bumps and vibration from riding on London roads.

Personally I keep my 'good' road bike for use at home and I'm in the process of building myself a Single Speed commuter from an old steel frame raleigh I picked up locally for £50. Striped down, cleaned and with a few new bits and bobs and it should be a nice little commuter bike for around £125 that will keep up with the rest quite nicely.

doodab
9th August 2012, 18:20
Not suggesting he gets a foldup, just implying the speed gains will be minimal with the same power output

Except of course that reduction in aerodynamic drag due to reduced frontal area when riding on the drops is very significant, compared to an upright commuter bike the speed gain could be ~20% or more.

DaveB
9th August 2012, 18:23
Except of course that reduction in aerodynamic drag due to reduced frontal area when riding on the drops is very significant, compared to an upright commuter bike the speed gain could be ~20% or more.

In London you will spend around 10% of your time on the drops, the rest on the hoods. You just can't get enough space to hammer it on the drops without it being extremely risky.

doodab
9th August 2012, 18:57
In London you will spend around 10% of your time on the drops, the rest on the hoods. You just can't get enough space to hammer it on the drops without it being extremely risky.

That depends where in london you are. In general you'll be safer moving at the speed of traffic or close to it, so while thats prob true in zone 1-3 if you're doing 15-20 miles in from the burbs that ratio will be a bit higher.

BrilloPad
9th August 2012, 19:30
Even with insurance you don't want to see your £1500 carbon frame reduced to splinters under a white van.

Don't. I have seen way too many accidents recently. Scary.

BigTime
9th August 2012, 19:41
An accountant told me of a director who'd put a new bike through the company books as part of the cycle to work scheme. Maybe I need a new bike too. Anyone else expensing their bike?

I got the impression there was no BIK but I could've been mistaken.

downsouth
9th August 2012, 20:13
Defo recommend going for a fitting at the local bike shop, maybe a few bike shops as they'll all have different makes, models etc and for £1500 you want the best bike for you not the salesman.

Different frames handle differently, being a larger lad i've a Cube with a straight top tube, reduces the seat post length so remains steady and doesn't flex like it would on the specialized with a sloping top bar.

Also bear in mind frame sizes are not uniform across different brands, you may be a 56cm in one, 58-60 in another.

Also for that price dont be tempted to go for carbon fibre, some bikes in that range are low grade carbon so you'd be better of with a good aluminum frame, carbon forks perhaps.

Unless you're doing loads of miles then groupset is not really an issue, other than the better groupset you want the more you'll pay.

HTH

mudskipper
9th August 2012, 20:38
I've got a Specialized Secteur Apex Elite with Fulcrum 7 racing wheels and ceramic cogs. Costs ~ £1,300 and I do 8,000 miles/year in rush-hour.

'Tis very good.

That's pretty good going. Just clocked up 15K miles on my bike, but that's over about 6 years and included a stupid 6 months when we trained for (and did) Lejog. Was thinking 15K might be a good excuse to buy a new bike, but not cycling so much these days, and my commute to work is fairly rough off road with bike laden with panniers and laptop so being a bit rough on the poor thing.

ZARDOZ
9th August 2012, 20:39
I'm tempted by one of these:

Ribble Special Edition Bikes | Frames | Wheels | Groupsets (http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/pu/road-track-bike/ribble-winter-training-audax-bikes/specialedition/1rw)

CTC Forum • View topic - Ribble Winter/Audax Bike (http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=4182)

http://www.bikeradar.com/road/gear/article/best-road-bikes-under-1000-29719/

doodab
9th August 2012, 22:04
An accountant told me of a director who'd put a new bike through the company books as part of the cycle to work scheme. Maybe I need a new bike too. Anyone else expensing their bike?

I got the impression there was no BIK but I could've been mistaken.

there is a scheme whereby you buy a bike through your employer and they can somehow reclaim the tax or something.

Tax free bikes for work through the Government's Green Transport Initiative - Cyclescheme, provider of Cycle to Work schemes for UK employers - Cyclescheme (http://www.cyclescheme.co.uk)

Moscow Mule
9th August 2012, 22:24
I would seriously consider eBay.

I bought a 3 year old Rockhopper (c£1500 new) for £400. A quick service down the LBS and jobs a goodun.

ZARDOZ
9th August 2012, 22:38
WHS
And , there are heavy discounts around the corner, on the last years Bike as the new models come in. IIRC this used to be around September/October

I always found Hargroves Cycles (Hants) to have good deals.

wurzel
10th August 2012, 08:09
there is a scheme whereby you buy a bike through your employer and they can somehow reclaim the tax or something.

Tax free bikes for work through the Government's Green Transport Initiative - Cyclescheme, provider of Cycle to Work schemes for UK employers - Cyclescheme (http://www.cyclescheme.co.uk)

This from NW:

Your company can provide a bike to you on the following conditions:

The bike and related equipment must be owned by the company

The bike is used primarily for qualifying journeys

Ownership of the equipment is not transferred to the employee during the loan period

The offer of the use of a loaned or provided cycle is available across the whole workforce (i.e. just myself)

The bike must be purchased by the company directly. If it is not in the first instance then you must sell the bike to your company.

They also say there's no need to use the cycle to work scheme - just buy the bike. I was looking into the cycle to work scheme & by all accounts it takes 2 - 4 weeks to enrol & at the end of it you get a voucher generally up to a maximum of £1000. Bloke in the bike shop said he couldn't do any discounts when buying with a voucher so this is probably not the way to go.

Notascooby
10th August 2012, 08:42
This from NW:

Your company can provide a bike to you on the following conditions:

The bike and related equipment must be owned by the company

The bike is used primarily for qualifying journeys

Ownership of the equipment is not transferred to the employee during the loan period

The offer of the use of a loaned or provided cycle is available across the whole workforce (i.e. just myself)

The bike must be purchased by the company directly. If it is not in the first instance then you must sell the bike to your company.

They also say there's no need to use the cycle to work scheme - just buy the bike. I was looking into the cycle to work scheme & by all accounts it takes 2 - 4 weeks to enrol & at the end of it you get a voucher generally up to a maximum of £1000. Bloke in the bike shop said he couldn't do any discounts when buying with a voucher so this is probably not the way to go.

My road bike is a company bike - it's just an asset like anything else and depreciates in the same way. I also expense any cycling safety equipment such as helemts, jackets, shoes etc. Then any new parts and servicing goes through the books too.

This for me adds up to a few hundred each year so is the way to go.

Unlike standard cycle-2-work schemes where there is a loan agreement in place, this is purely a company asset and as such there's no restriction on the value. Hence my company bike costs >£2K which is perfectly fine.

(The reason most companies put a £1K limit on the c2w scheme is that above this level they *may* need a license to lend to employees, so they don't bother - there's no government imposed limit).

hyperD
10th August 2012, 18:21
I'm on the 20p/mile jobbie - works out at around £110/month - although I bought the bike privately. Not put the services and clothing etc through the business though.

Notascooby
13th August 2012, 09:30
I'm on the 20p/mile jobbie - works out at around £110/month - although I bought the bike privately. Not put the services and clothing etc through the business though.


Why would you not *cough* claim 45p mileage for your *cough* car journey rather than 20ppm for cycling? Then still but the bike through the company and cycle to work?

Notascooby
13th August 2012, 09:32
Why would you not *cough* claim 45p mileage for your *cough* car journey rather than 20ppm for cycling? Then still but the bike through the company and cycle to work?

It would appear that I left my PC unattended in a public space and the above potentially fraudulent advice was posted - I could never condone this behaviour and it is not something I'd personally undertake.

Mich the Tester
13th August 2012, 09:43
I have a cannondale caad 9 with shimano 105 group and I'm very happy with it, but it really depends on you; how much do you weigh, how much and how hard you ride etc.

lukemg
13th August 2012, 10:07
I've got a 10-yr old Marin East Peak dual sus mountain bike (about a grand at the time). Go on the odd country track but mostly country lanes and no mountains so not the best choice. BUT - With fat wheels and suspension it is the most comfortable bike I have ever ridden and since I mostly cycle for fitness, I think it's a good choice as surely this will be harder work than a 'proper' road bike meaning I can get fit doing half the mileage ? Or am I wrong ?

northernladuk
13th August 2012, 10:31
I'll be doing quite a bit of mileage on bumpy country lanes & apparently this style frame is perfect for soaking up the bumps, according to the salesman. My only reservation is with the lifespan of the graphite frame. I've heard that cracks can develop after a relatively short period of time.

Anyone got any recommendations? Don't want to spend more than £1.5k. TIA.

I know sod all about bikes but how does a solid frame soak up bumps? I thought the goal was the stiffist frame and lightest weight which does not indicate to me it will soak up a single bump?? :confused: If a salesman tried pulling that one on me I would seriously doubt a single word he said after that. Anyone enlighten me please?

doodab
13th August 2012, 11:10
I know sod all about bikes but how does a solid frame soak up bumps? I thought the goal was the stiffist frame and lightest weight which does not indicate to me it will soak up a single bump??

It flexes.

Like most engineering, frame design involves finding a compromise by balancing different desirable characteristics. Weight & stiffness are important but you can't easily have more of one without less of the other, and comfort and cost are just as or more important to most people as well. Different materials will provide a different balance but there are lots of other factors like the length of the chainstays, wheelbase, fork rake as well as the stiffness of individual tubes that can make a big difference as well. In the case of carbon fibre frames the lay up can be tweaked so that frames are laterally stiff to transmit power but vertically compliant to soak up bumps, obviously the more complex the layup the harder (and more expensive) it is to make.

Notascooby
13th August 2012, 11:21
The audax style frames have curved forks to absorb more vibration, also carbon is very stiff but great for absorbtion. Carbon is also brilliant as its light and doesn't rust. What it doesn't like is latteral impact, so crashes can right off a frame which would dent Aluminum. Titanum is a fantastic option, lasts for ever, great absorbtion doesn't rust, looks nice and takes a hammering.

DaveB
13th August 2012, 12:53
The audax style frames have curved forks to absorb more vibration, also carbon is very stiff but great for absorbtion. Carbon is also brilliant as its light and doesn't rust. What it doesn't like is latteral impact, so crashes can right off a frame which would dent Aluminum. Titanum is a fantastic option, lasts for ever, great absorbtion doesn't rust, looks nice and takes a hammering.

And costs a bloody fortune, although not quite as much as a carbon frame, granted.

The most comfortable frames are still steel. Not as light as the others so the performance is not as good if speed is your thing, but much more comfortable. Absorbs "road buzz" much better than any of the others and can be repaired easily if the need arises ( you can't weld or reshape alu or titanium frames if you bend one).

They also last forever as long as you look after them little.

Steel -
Comfortable, Durable, Repairable, Strong, Cheap, Requires the smallest tubes for frame stiffness, Cool if retro is your thing.
Heavy, can suffer from fatigue, corrosion is a problem if not cared for, Uncool if not into retro.

Aluminium -
Lighter, won't corrode, easier to form into Aero shapes, good for larger lightweight frames. Neither cool nor uncool. Default choice for most riders.
Not as cheap, Less comfortable, can be brittle, can suffer from fatigue, not easly repairable, needs larger thinner tubes, frames can be written off by cracks or bends. Big thin tubes are more vulnerable in a crash.

Titanium -
Lighter than steel, heaver than aluminium. Won't corrode, needs larger diamiter tubes than steel but not as large as aluminium, resistant to metal fatigue. More comfortable than aluminium, less so than steel. Cool, but understated.
Most expensive, hard to impossible to repair if you do bend it.

Carbon -
Lightest, stiffist, strongest (if well built), no corrosion, great fatigue strength, highly customisable for exotic frame designs. Very Cool.
Expensive, reliant on build quality for durability (cheap or poorly designed frames can be subject to catastrophic failure), hard to repair, "notch sensitive" minor damage can lead to total failure. Excessive stiffness can lead to poor ride comfort.