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Not a Pleb
25th October 2012, 08:24
Hello, everybody. I hope you can help.

I have been taken on in a junior project delivery role and being paid accordingly. After kicking my heels waiting for the work to start, I've been told by the client to take responsibility for a big high-profile project instead. According to the grapevine, it is going horribly wrong big time behind the scenes and has only been kept going by a gifted and senior project manager. But he's leaving (I wonder why?)

I don't want to walk out over this because there's only the bench to look forward to. I haven't spoken to the agent yet but I expect he'll tell me to get on with it and not upset his client.

Any suggestions on how to wriggle out of this mess (though there's nothing else to do) or how to negotiate a much better compensation me for the long hours and stress this poisoned chalice will need?

Zippy
25th October 2012, 10:55
Oooh, tricky.

Do you think you could have a go? I mean - is the issue that you're not getting paid for the level of work, or is it that it'll go tits-up and you'll get the blame?
I suppose you could offer to review the project, write a report and then (subject to your review) tell the client it won't work or ask for more money.

You might have to walk though ....

northernladuk
25th October 2012, 10:56
Well for a start you need to check your contract and see what your deliverables/scope/spec was. If it says you are to 'Manage <insert technology> Project and deliver to <Insert business area>' and you are being asked to do another project you are falling foul of client direction and control which puts you in a heap of trouble with IR35. It isn't a killer but it is certainly something to consider carefully.

That aside, my personal view on it is to get stuck in. You don't move from junior PM to senior PM by avoiding opportunites to learn and grow. It's failing so you are damned if you do and damned if you don't so can't really mess it up any more. At the very worst you get a few months exposure and you are asked to leave. Compare that to you leaving now with no experience and no gig to go to. Seems pretty obvious what to do IMO...

If you are that nervous about it you could sit the client down and point out that you are willing to do the work but you do feel it is out of your comfort zone so there maybe problems. Saying that why you would do this I have no idea as he may then walk you before you have even given it shot.

Get stuck in, deliver for a month or two and get in to a position where it will be difficult for the client to replace you then demand you raise the rate to match or you are off.

Support Monkey
25th October 2012, 11:54
Well for a start you need to check your contract and see what your deliverables/scope/spec was. If it says you are to 'Manage <insert technology> Project and deliver to <Insert business area>' and you are being asked to do another project you are falling foul of client direction and control which puts you in a heap of trouble with IR35. It isn't a killer but it is certainly something to consider carefully.

That aside, my personal view on it is to get stuck in. You don't move from junior PM to senior PM by avoiding opportunites to learn and grow. It's failing so you are damned if you do and damned if you don't so can't really mess it up any more. At the very worst you get a few months exposure and you are asked to leave. Compare that to you leaving now with no experience and no gig to go to. Seems pretty obvious what to do IMO...

If you are that nervous about it you could sit the client down and point out that you are willing to do the work but you do feel it is out of your comfort zone so there maybe problems. Saying that why you would do this I have no idea as he may then walk you before you have even given it shot.

Get stuck in, deliver for a month or two and get in to a position where it will be difficult for the client to replace you then demand you raise the rate to match or you are off.

WHS +1

Wanderer
25th October 2012, 18:12
get stuck in. You don't move from junior PM to senior PM by avoiding opportunites to learn and grow.

Get stuck in, deliver for a month or two and get in to a position where it will be difficult for the client to replace you then demand you raise the rate to match or you are off.

:yay: Bloody right. WHS +2

You're not a pleb any more, you're a contractor now so get on with it. Take some risks, kick some arse. If you fail then pick yourself up, learn from your mistakes and get on with the next gig. If you succeed then you've got a new feather for your cap.

That's what contracting is about, shrinking violets should go back to being permies. :)

BolshieBastard
27th October 2012, 19:17
Hello, everybody. I hope you can help.

I have been taken on in a junior project delivery role and being paid accordingly. After kicking my heels waiting for the work to start, I've been told by the client to take responsibility for a big high-profile project instead. According to the grapevine, it is going horribly wrong big time behind the scenes and has only been kept going by a gifted and senior project manager. But he's leaving (I wonder why?)

I don't want to walk out over this because there's only the bench to look forward to. I haven't spoken to the agent yet but I expect he'll tell me to get on with it and not upset his client.

Any suggestions on how to wriggle out of this mess (though there's nothing else to do) or how to negotiate a much better compensation me for the long hours and stress this poisoned chalice will need?

Before taking the role on, make sure they are going to pay you more and not expecting you to take charge on a junior's rate.

Obviously, they wont want to pay you top wack but if they want you to take the responsibility, you need them to know you want a comensurate rate.

TBH, an opportunity has presented itself here. Take the bull by the horns and take it on. Look at it this way, if it goes tits up, you tried your best and more experienced people decided not to do it. If you pull it off, well there you go!

Good luck.