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NotAllThere
20th November 2012, 14:40
What's the shelf life of a techie? Just 15 years - The Economic Times (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/news-by-company/corporate-trends/whats-the-shelf-life-of-a-techie-just-15-years/articleshow/17251620.cms)

That's what the MD of SAP India says...

Mich the Tester
20th November 2012, 14:43
What's the shelf life of a techie? Just 15 years - The Economic Times (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/news-by-company/corporate-trends/whats-the-shelf-life-of-a-techie-just-15-years/articleshow/17251620.cms)

That's what the MD of SAP India says...

I assume the industry will be rid of him within a year or so then.

vetran
20th November 2012, 14:49
"The shelf life of a software engineer today is no more than that of a cricketer - about 15 years," says V R Ferose, MD of German software major SAP's India R&D Labs that has over 4,500 employees . "The 20-year-old guys provide me more value than the 35-year-olds do." - I can charge them out regardless of ability at the same £2K a day but they only charge me 1/6th of UK minimum wage unlike the 35 year olds who want 1/5 the greedy pigs how am I supposed to afford the MOET?


FTFH

would that be the same SAP that is slowly getting less reliable and precise?

Hurrah soon we will get paid the same as cricketers!

alreadypacked
20th November 2012, 14:56
What's the shelf life of a techie? Just 15 years - The Economic Times (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/news-by-company/corporate-trends/whats-the-shelf-life-of-a-techie-just-15-years/articleshow/17251620.cms)

That's what the MD of SAP India says...

I think this is more relevant to the Indian market, people work like hell to get expert in an area, then sit back (they still have a job for life mentality). With so many new grads coming into the market in India, employers can take on new grads for new areas.

In Europe people don't have the jobs for life mentality anymore, and continue to up-skill all the time.

rootsnall
20th November 2012, 15:05
FTFH

would that be the same SAP that is slowly getting less reliable and precise?

Hurrah soon we will get paid the same as cricketers!

The more flakey it gets the more work there is for developers. If there was only the old reliable R/3 system around we'd be stuffed.

DS23
20th November 2012, 15:16
rubbish. 46 and busier than ever. transition from from bum-on-seat to multi-client consultant is well underway. well, either that or it's just a brief alignment of shiny things in the firmwareament.

Lockhouse
20th November 2012, 15:28
50 last month, still techie, retiring in 3-4 years.

BlasterBates
20th November 2012, 15:30
There used to be a similar attitude in Europe. I remember a 45 year old (God forbid) joining our company. They took him on but only after a trial period, lots of discussions about whether he'd be up to it. Those were the days. The MD was 35 or 36 the oldest guy in the company.

SupremeSpod
20th November 2012, 15:34
Apparently there's a shortage of ancient techies like me wot knows about the elecktrickery side of all this stuff.

Which might explain the endless series of contract notifications that end up in my email.

Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump Jump

Bunk
20th November 2012, 15:34
Apparently there's a shortage of ancient techies like me wot knows about the elecktrickery side of all this stuff.

Which might explain the endless series of contract notifications that end up in my email.

Boomed Zeity, you're just coming into your prime :smokin

darmstadt
20th November 2012, 15:57
Apparently there's a shortage of ancient techies like me wot knows about the elecktrickery side of all this stuff.

Which might explain the endless series of contract notifications that end up in my email.

My son has recently started University here studying Informatik (Computer Studies?) and I've been looking, and attempting to help, at his coursework and there's quite a fair bit of that in it. How computers, chips, components, etc are built and the finer details. Got me quite sentimental at some points

Mich the Tester
20th November 2012, 16:38
Tried introducing the Esteemed Customers to the finer details of stuff like that but they all fell asleep.

:ohwell

Now all they get is the coarser details.

They still fall asleep though.

I'm trying to find the commonality in the falling asleep, but I can't quite put my claw on it at the moment.


And some of them still can't understand breadboards.

:suicide:

Maybe they're just thick.

northernladuk
20th November 2012, 16:41
Don't forget the average life expectancy of someone from birth in India is 65 he could be right, they are half dead by then.

Mich the Tester
20th November 2012, 16:49
I couldn't possibly comment. :eyes

The breadboard thing really frustrates me because I can't for the life of me understand what the problem is.

Isn't a breadboard a kind of 'lego for sparkies' that allows you to test a circuit before building the real one, then rebuild easily if it doesn't work?

Seems pretty simple to me.

escapeUK
20th November 2012, 18:41
In Europe people don't have the jobs for life mentality anymore, and continue to up-skill all the time.

I think you are looking at a very narrow area such as your own field and thinking this is representative of everyone.

Most people I know outside of IT certainty arent up-skilling ever.

d000hg
20th November 2012, 19:25
I've only got 5 more years until I can retire then. Nice.

SueEllen
20th November 2012, 19:37
I think you are looking at a very narrow area such as your own field and thinking this is representative of everyone.

Most people I know outside of IT certainty arent up-skilling ever.

What job do they do?

If they are in certain non-IT career paths they are as they have no choice.

doodab
20th November 2012, 21:04
I wrote a macro in excel vba today. Get a 20 year old graddie to do that :rollin:

NotAllThere
21st November 2012, 05:34
I've only got 5 more years until I can retire then. Nice.
Or anywhere in the South of France really.


I wrote a macro in excel vba today. Get a 20 year old graddie to do that :rollin:That would be tricky, since most don't graduate until 21 or over. If I need an excel VBA macro though, I'd normally get some young grad to do it.

MarillionFan
21st November 2012, 06:02
Or anywhere in the South of France really.

That would be tricky, since most don't graduate until 21 or over. If I need an excel VBA macro though, I'd normally get some young grad to do it.

I was in a room today with a group of about 5 mid 20 somethings when one pulled up his super complex spreadsheet full of formulas & presented it to the assembled room of his peers. WoW! Incredible! The expletives of this young guys business model from his peers was incredible.

"I'm stuck on one thing" he said and proceeded to explain to the other 5 fast trackers in the company what he couldnt do. I wasn't paying that much attention & eventually one asked me to have a look. I leant forward, had a look and hit Alt-F11 to knock up VBA.

It was like Jesus had come down to earth in a space ship and ridden out on a dinosaur.

"You're all fookin kidding me, right?"

None of them even knew it existed. :rolleyes:

mudskipper
21st November 2012, 06:34
I was in a room today with a group of about 5 mid 20 somethings when one pulled up his super complex spreadsheet full of formulas & presented it to the assembled room of his peers. WoW! Incredible! The expletives of this young guys business model from his peers was incredible.

"I'm stuck on one thing" he said and proceeded to explain to the other 5 fast trackers in the company what he couldnt do. I wasn't paying that much attention & eventually one asked me to have a look. I leant forward, had a look and hit Alt-F11 to knock up VBA.

It was like Jesus had come down to earth in a space ship and ridden out on a dinosaur.

"You're all fookin kidding me, right?"

None of them even knew it existed. :rolleyes:

:oldgit:

escapeUK
21st November 2012, 07:25
What job do they do?

If they are in certain non-IT career paths they are as they have no choice.

Just everyday jobs like working in sales, accounts, production. Most people arent in careers they are in jobs to earn money.



"You're all fookin kidding me, right?"

None of them even knew it existed. :rolleyes:

I bet they know lots of socialist dogma, but very little life skills that people will actually pay you for.

doodab
21st November 2012, 07:37
I can sort of understand where he's going from. I meet quite a few middle aged clowns who come out with the old "I used to be technical" line, usually before asking for help with something incredibly basic. The "I'm not technical" ones drive me mental TBH. Why are you here then? Did you lie to get through the door?

OTOH I've met plenty of guys who grew up on mainframes and vaxen and adapted to the modern world just fine, nothing phases them and I've learn a lot from them over the years. So it's perfectly possible to stay technically current and if you do you have an advantage over a youngun IMO.

Personally I like learning things but I take a slightly different attitude now, I tend to avoid jumping on every next big thing bandwagon and concentrate on stuff that interests me. I know that if I need to pick something up quickly for a job I can, and 90% of what makes you a good developer is transferrable between paradigms.

Macavity
21st November 2012, 07:48
Few guys under 35 can actually program cleanly and concisely, let alone understand the business domain (if its banking).

All the 20 year olds I see are busy writing their own frameworks and inventing their own way of doing things. It takes a certain amount of experience to work with the time honoured standard solutions and patterns.

Scrag Meister
21st November 2012, 08:11
If I need an excel VBA macro though, I'd normally get some young grad to do it.

Yeah but when push comes to shove you invite a 46 year old from England to review his work. :D

sbakoola
21st November 2012, 08:20
yes, its very worrying. When I hit 50 its unlikely that I'll be in banking still contracting. Need to get plan b sorted pronto.

Lockhouse
21st November 2012, 08:26
My take on it is; when I started I had to do two years in IT before I became really productive. You couldn't just write a program and feed it to a mainframe, you had to understand the file system, JCL, linking etc all before you understood how your actual code worked. This was all without Google - it was all done from manuals and your peers. If you were lucky, you got your training on a good site which was run properly. That structured depth of appreciation of technical issues just isn't available to people today who grew up with IT and learn things organically. They may be talented but their ideas are all over the place.

NotAllThere
21st November 2012, 19:15
Yeah but when push comes to shove you invite a 46 year old from England to review his work. :D
Touché.

:rollin:

darmstadt
21st November 2012, 20:02
My take on it is; when I started I had to do two years in IT before I became really productive. You couldn't just write a program and feed it to a mainframe, you had to understand the file system, JCL, linking etc all before you understood how your actual code worked. This was all without Google - it was all done from manuals and your peers. If you were lucky, you got your training on a good site which was run properly. That structured depth of appreciation of technical issues just isn't available to people today who grew up with IT and learn things organically. They may be talented but their ideas are all over the place.

WHS +1 (and still doing that, mentoring a young chap at the moment this very way)