PDA

View Full Version : Inspired by Brillo, my fitness training ....



sasguru
19th June 2013, 07:54
... well the high ideals went out the window (being teetotal, cutting down on red meat etc, doing the London marathon).
So all things in moderation, a bit of what you fancy does you good etc.
But I've kept up the exercise regime and feel fitter than I've ever been in my adult life.
didn't need to lose a lot of weight but cut half a stone off.
Can run 5km in 30 mins (that's mainly uphill on my standard route) which is Ok. coupled with squash and a bit of gym that's ample.

suityou01
19th June 2013, 07:55
:tumble:

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 08:10
... well the high ideals went out the window (being teetotal, cutting down on red meat etc, doing the London marathon).
So all things in moderation, a bit of what you fancy does you good etc.
But I've kept up the exercise regime and feel fitter than I've ever been in my adult life.
didn't need to lose a lot of weight but cut half a stone off.
Can run 5km in 30 mins (that's mainly uphill on my standard route) which is Ok. coupled with squash and a bit of gym that's ample.

Start with your head. That should knock a couple of pounds off. Maybe 3 if you've read the beano that particular day.

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 08:12
... well the high ideals went out the window (being teetotal, cutting down on red meat etc, doing the London marathon).
So all things in moderation, a bit of what you fancy does you good etc.
But I've kept up the exercise regime and feel fitter than I've ever been in my adult life.
didn't need to lose a lot of weight but cut half a stone off.
Can run 5km in 30 mins (that's mainly uphill on my standard route) which is Ok. coupled with squash and a bit of gym that's ample.

If you manage 10kmh for an hour then you'll be a lot fitter than the average bod. Not top level sports material, but if that's not what you need then it's fine. Perhaps do a few short sprints of 40 to 50 metres with 40 to 50 metre walk recovery or leg speed exercises during your run now that you're reasonably fit; interval training is pretty good for burning calories, and the modern thinking is that maintaining leg speed and looking after the fast twitch muscle fibres will help in keeping your muscles strong as you get older; introducing a bit of power in the whole thing seems to help keep your bones strong too.

You might even consider buying a bike and taking a look at this; Routes - EuroVelo - the European cycle route network (http://www.eurovelo.org/routes/) but perhaps that's for the real fitness loons. I don't know when I'll be benched, but hopefully this project will last long enough to let me take a couple of months off and perhaps do the route from the North Cape to Sicily.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 08:13
If you manage 10kmh for an hour then you'll be a lot fitter than the average bod. Not top level sports material, but if that's not what you need then it's fine. Perhaps do a few short sprints of 40 to 50 metres with 40 to 50 metre walk recovery or leg speed exercises during your run now that you're reasonably fit; interval training is pretty good for burning calories, and the modern thinking is that maintaining leg speed and looking after the fast twitch muscle fibres will help in keeping your muscles strong as you get older; introducing a bit of power in the whole thing seems to help keep your bones strong too.

You might even consider buying a bike and taking a look at this; Routes - EuroVelo - the European cycle route network (http://www.eurovelo.org/routes/) but perhaps that's for the real fitness loons. I don't know when I'll be benched, but hopefully this project will last long enough to let me take a couple of months off and perhaps do the route from the North Cape to Sicily.

Cycling, varying the cadence works for me.

sasguru
19th June 2013, 08:17
If you manage 10kmh for an hour then you'll be a lot fitter than the average bod. Not top level sports material, but if that's not what you need then it's fine. Perhaps do a few short sprints of 40 to 50 metres with 40 to 50 metre walk recovery or leg speed exercises during your run now that you're reasonably fit; interval training is pretty good for burning calories, and the modern thinking is that maintaining leg speed and looking after the fast twitch muscle fibres will help in keeping your muscles strong as you get older; introducing a bit of power in the whole thing seems to help keep your bones strong too.

You might even consider buying a bike and taking a look at this; Routes - EuroVelo - the European cycle route network (http://www.eurovelo.org/routes/) but perhaps that's for the real fitness loons. I don't know when I'll be benched, but hopefully this project will last long enough to let me take a couple of months off and perhaps do the route from the North Cape to Sicily.

Just wanted to improve my basic fitness. Have joined a gym with a swimming pool - that should be the icing on the cake.

Ketchup
19th June 2013, 08:19
Cycling, varying the cadence works for me.

Road or mountain?

I am looking at buying a bike but can't decide which way to go.

DimPrawn
19th June 2013, 08:21
Just wanted to improve my basic fitness. Have joined a gym with a swimming pool - that should be the icing on the cake.

I'm amazed you fit it all in. Gym, swimming, two clients paying £900/day, reading endless math books, doing an Msc, driving your Toyota sports car, going on holiday, staying in your villa in Portugal, spending time with your sprog.....all combined with 10 hours straight shift of telling us all about it on CUK......

:rolleyes:

MyUserName
19th June 2013, 08:22
Just wanted to improve my basic fitness. Have joined a gym with a swimming pool - that should be the icing on the cake.

A lot of people think that but they do not realise that you also have to go to the gym and exercise.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 08:23
Road or mountain?

I am looking at buying a bike but can't decide which way to go.

Road bike. The rolling resistance of a mountain bike makes longer distances almost impossible; it's altogether larger, heavier, and just not built for speed.

Depends what you want to do. If you want to get fit, quickly, I'd say road bike; start witha few weeks of 15 milers, then pop in 2*40 milers a week. Will kill you to start, but within 2-3 weeks, you'll be pissing them. Then start adding bigger hills in the rides. If you did 2*40 miles a week, you'd be fit, quickly, and could live normally, as such.

Tat's my take. But I have an MTB as well, and hooning down trails is a lot of fun, if slightly dangerous, from the not taking time off work injured front.

sasguru
19th June 2013, 08:24
I'm amazed you fit it all in. Gym, swimming, two clients paying £900/day, reading endless math books, doing an Msc, driving your Toyota sports car, going on holiday, staying in your villa in Portugal, spending time with your sprog.....all combined with 10 hours straight shift of telling us all about it on CUK......

:rolleyes:

Yeah like I do all those things at once.
Got some advice for you: stop watching telly and see how many extra hours you get.
And use one day in the weekend to do something useful.
Beats being a dull unemployed cretin like you, doesn't it?

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 08:25
I'm amazed you fit it all in. Gym, swimming, two clients paying £900/day, reading endless math books, doing an Msc, driving your Toyota sports car, going on holiday, staying in your villa in Portugal, spending time with your sprog.....all combined with 10 hours straight shift of telling us all about it on CUK......

:rolleyes:

In all fairness, he tells us he spends all that time with his sprog, but he has a nanny look after him 2 days a week, and the other three days a week, sends him to nursery.

:rollin:

cailin maith
19th June 2013, 08:27
I'm amazed you fit it all in. Gym, swimming, two clients paying £900/day, reading endless math books, doing an Msc, driving your Toyota sports car, going on holiday, staying in your villa in Portugal, spending time with your sprog.....all combined with 10 hours straight shift of telling us all about it on CUK......

:rolleyes:

:laugh Sorry Sas, he has a point.

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 08:27
A lot of people think that but they do not realise that you also have to go to the gym and admire the laydees in the aerobics hall.

ftfy

sasguru
19th June 2013, 08:28
:laugh Sorry Sas, he has a point.

See above.

DimPrawn
19th June 2013, 08:28
Oops, sorry I forgot running your portfolio of BTL properties in Central London and cooking the wife's dinner when she gets home.

:happy

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 08:29
:laugh Sorry Sas, he has a point.
See above.

So he does have a point?

:rollin:

sasguru
19th June 2013, 08:30
Oops, sorry I forgot running your portfolio of BTL properties in Central London and cooking the wife's dinner when she gets home.

:happy

Agent does the property, nanny does the cooking.
Anyway do tell us more of your life. Have you stopped shagging the endless birds since your divorce and purchase of your terrace in Swindon?

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 08:35
Agent does the property, nanny does the cooking.



Of course, of course

:rollin:

stek
19th June 2013, 08:44
Wish I was the SASguru machine - Zero Defects.......

DimPrawn
19th June 2013, 08:45
Agent does the property, nanny does the cooking.


Who wipes the dribble off your chin?

:laugh

sasguru
19th June 2013, 08:46
Wish I was the SASguru machine - Zero Defects.......

First step is throw away your telly. :smokin

sasguru
19th June 2013, 08:47
Who wipes the dribble off your chin?

:laugh

Why, you looking for a job?

DimPrawn
19th June 2013, 08:52
Why, you looking for a job?

No, I'm making a fortune buying and selling unicorn horns at the moment whilst doing a Phd in time travel.

:rolleyes:

sasguru
19th June 2013, 08:53
No, I'm making a fortune buying and selling unicorn horns at the moment whilst doing a Phd in time travel.

:rolleyes:

Seriously what do you do for a living?

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 08:54
First step is throw away your telly. :smokin

This is a fair point though folks; those blasted things waste huge chunks of your life. I've almost given up watching it at home. Loads more time to cook and eat well, ride my bike etc. Start by resolving never to eat a TV dinner and always sit down at the dinner table to eat together.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 08:57
This is a fair point though folks; those blasted things waste huge chunks of your life. I've almost given up watching it at home. Loads more time to cook and eat well, ride my bike etc. Start by resolving never to eat a TV dinner and always sit down at the dinner table to eat together.

It’s always been a family rule that we eat together all the time, regardless how many are at home. TV is only ever on as a treat, and is not the status quo.

Having said that, I managed to put away the first season of Banshee in the last week, but only while away. Now that does take the time away...

sasguru
19th June 2013, 08:57
This is a fair point though folks; those blasted things waste huge chunks of your life. I've almost given up watching it at home. Loads more time to cook and eat well, ride my bike etc. Start by resolving never to eat a TV dinner and always sit down at the dinner table to eat together.

Aye its an extra 15-20 hours a week for most people.
Sadly my addiction to scourging the cretins on CUK means I sometimes end up using some of that time to finish work.:laugh:laugh

DimPrawn
19th June 2013, 08:58
This is a fair point though folks; those blasted things waste huge chunks of your life. I've almost given up watching it at home. Loads more time to cook and eat well, ride my bike etc. Start by resolving never to eat a TV dinner and always sit down at the dinner table to eat together.

I only use mine to watch films or documentries.

Annoys the crap out of me having to pay TV licence when I watch almost nothing from the BBC. :tantrum:

oracleslave
19th June 2013, 08:58
I'm amazed you fit it all in. Gym, swimming, two clients paying £900/day, reading endless math books, doing an Msc, driving your Toyota sports car, going on holiday, staying in your villa in Portugal, spending time with your sprog.....all combined with 10 hours straight shift of telling us all about it on CUK......

:rolleyes:


No, I'm making a fortune buying and selling unicorn horns at the moment whilst doing a Phd in time travel.

:rolleyes:

:yay: On fire today son :happy

DimPrawn
19th June 2013, 08:59
Seriously what do you do for a living?

I'm independently wealthy....

sasguru
19th June 2013, 09:02
I'm independently wealthy....

No one independently wealthy lives in Swindon.
So how did you make your fortune?

DimPrawn
19th June 2013, 09:05
No one independently wealthy lives in Swindon.
So how did you make your fortune?

Property speculation, built up and sold a business, investment of contracting income.

sasguru
19th June 2013, 09:07
Property speculation, built up and sold a business, investment of contracting income.

So why live in a tuliphole like Swindon?

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 09:07
So why live in a tuliphole like Swindon?

You live in Wandsworth you say?

sasguru
19th June 2013, 09:09
Annoys the crap out of me having to pay TV licence when I watch almost nothing from the BBC. :tantrum:

It's very satisfying batting away the TV-licencing people. They can't believe people wouldn't have a telly.

Ketchup
19th June 2013, 09:11
Road bike. The rolling resistance of a mountain bike makes longer distances almost impossible; it's altogether larger, heavier, and just not built for speed.

Depends what you want to do. If you want to get fit, quickly, I'd say road bike; start witha few weeks of 15 milers, then pop in 2*40 milers a week. Will kill you to start, but within 2-3 weeks, you'll be pissing them. Then start adding bigger hills in the rides. If you did 2*40 miles a week, you'd be fit, quickly, and could live normally, as such.

Tat's my take. But I have an MTB as well, and hooning down trails is a lot of fun, if slightly dangerous, from the not taking time off work injured front.

Sorry to bring this back on topic.

I used to do a lot of mountain biking when i was young and bit of downhill racing. This village i grew up in had an old gravel quarry in the woods which was quite famous with mountain bikers ("Treasure island" in Danbury). I wasn't sure whether the rolling resistance of a mountain bike and the more varied terrain could have meant it was better for calorie expenditure.

Any recommendations of an entry level road bike? I know very little about them, i have done a bit of research and the Specialized Allez seems a good place to start.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 09:16
Sorry to bring this back on topic.

I used to do a lot of mountain biking when i was young and bit of downhill racing. This village i grew up in had an old gravel quarry in the woods which was quite famous with mountain bikers ("Treasure island" in Danbury). I wasn't sure whether the rolling resistance of a mountain bike and the more varied terrain could have meant it was better for calorie expenditure.

Any recommendations of an entry level road bike? I know very little about them, i have done a bit of research and the Specialized Allez seems a good place to start.

Trek have the best, imo, alloy frames, but if you go into carbon, you have smaller cottage industry German manufacturers building some great items for about £1500, but if you spend over £2k, you can claim 20% VAT back and make it a company purchase (it’s also a depreciating asset, so you can write it off after a short while).

If you had 700-800, I’d go for a trek. Any lower, and you’re looking at Boardmans, and Carrera’s from Halfords, to be honest and the quality of the components slip.

Personally, I go MTB for fun, and Road bike for exercise, and always have felt that way. You get places quicker on the road bike, so I guess some of it might be mentally i.e. you can punt out a 60 miler on a Sunday morning instead of a 30 miler.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 09:17
It's very satisfying batting away the TV-licencing people. They can't believe people wouldn't have a telly.

To be frank sas, I haven’t once had to bat them away, so I am surprised you have had to.

Ketchup
19th June 2013, 09:20
Trek have the best, imo, alloy frames, but if you go into carbon, you have smaller cottage industry German manufacturers building some great items for about £1500, but if you spend over £2k, you can claim 20% VAT back and make it a company purchase (it’s also a depreciating asset, so you can write it off after a short while).

If you had 700-800, I’d go for a trek. Any lower, and you’re looking at Boardmans, and Carrera’s from Halfords, to be honest and the quality of the components slip.

Personally, I go MTB for fun, and Road bike for exercise, and always have felt that way. You get places quicker on the road bike, so I guess some of it might be mentally i.e. you can punt out a 60 miler on a Sunday morning instead of a 30 miler.

Thank you, my MTB is actually a trek (6000), about 10 years old and still a fantastic bike. There is also the cycle to work scheme i was looking at, but the bike would be purely for personal use as i wouldn't like to leave an expensive bike chained up in London.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 09:22
Thank you, my MTB is actually a trek (6000), about 10 years old and still a fantastic bike. There is also the cycle to work scheme i was looking at, but the bike would be purely for personal use as i wouldn't like to leave an expensive bike chained up in London.

Don't take it then.

The best way to buy the bike, is through the company, as you save heaps of money, in the long run, through the assets depreciation and through VAT. I'd seriously recommend it.

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 09:35
It’s always been a family rule that we eat together all the time, regardless how many are at home. TV is only ever on as a treat, and is not the status quo.

Having said that, I managed to put away the first season of Banshee in the last week, but only while away. Now that does take the time away...

You know it wouldn't surprise me if a lot of marriage breakups can be traced back to TV dinners or eating at seperate times. Sitting down to dinner with each other, lighting a couple of candles, and putting in the 20 minutes or so of effort to cook something proper means you talk with each other, which is pretty damned important. OK, so I'm away 3 nights a week, but the other 4 nights we always sit down to dinner together, usually at home, sometimes in a restaurant. Amazes me how many people don't do that. Maybe we're just foodies though.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 09:39
You know it wouldn't surprise me if a lot of marriage breakups can be traced back to TV dinners or eating at seperate times. Sitting down to dinner with each other, lighting a couple of candles, and putting in the 20 minutes or so of effort to cook something proper means you talk with each other, which is pretty damned important. OK, so I'm away 3 nights a week, but the other 4 nights we always sit down to dinner together, usually at home, sometimes in a restaurant. Amazes me how many people don't do that. Maybe we're just foodies though.

We just made a conscious decision to have all meals as a family, when we could, but if the kids eat early, for example, of a weekend, the wife and I will always eat together. I come from a very large family and used to love dinner time, as we’d all come together and have a crack taking the piss all the time, and it’s kept, in my opinion, the family close. Now, with my family, we all sit down, have a giggle and talk about the day. Dinner alone with my wife, I really do enjoy, as we can then cook a more flavoursome meal together, and chat, have a glass of wine or two. Like you, I am sure it’s beneficial to us as a couple, and us as a family.

DimPrawn
19th June 2013, 09:41
You know it wouldn't surprise me if a lot of marriage breakups can be traced back to TV dinners or eating at seperate times. Sitting down to dinner with each other, lighting a couple of candles, and putting in the 20 minutes or so of effort to cook something proper means you talk with each other, which is pretty damned important. OK, so I'm away 3 nights a week, but the other 4 nights we always sit down to dinner together, usually at home, sometimes in a restaurant. Amazes me how many people don't do that. Maybe we're just foodies though.

Don't worry Mitch, your missus doesn't dine alone on the other three nights.

:wink

b0redom
19th June 2013, 09:54
Sorry to bring this back on topic.

I used to do a lot of mountain biking when i was young and bit of downhill racing. This village i grew up in had an old gravel quarry in the woods which was quite famous with mountain bikers ("Treasure island" in Danbury). I wasn't sure whether the rolling resistance of a mountain bike and the more varied terrain could have meant it was better for calorie expenditure.

Any recommendations of an entry level road bike? I know very little about them, i have done a bit of research and the Specialized Allez seems a good place to start.

Prior to my expensive carbon bike I had a Specialized TriCross. You can put skinny tyres on it and it behaves pretty much like a road bike, or leave the standard ones on it and fly along canal tow paths. Because it's a cross bike the wheels are bomb proof too so they soak up the pot holes etc, and the carbon forks help with dampening the road buzz.

It also has mounting points for a panier rack if you decide to use it to commute with, and 'cheater' brakes for when you're riding on the tops instead of drops.

I had a Trek hybrid prior to that and although it was OK (the gearing wasn't high enough for going down hills fast) I didn't like the local Trek dealer.

As others have said, buy it through your company. It's a company vehicle then, but has no BIK as it's zero emission.

minestrone
19th June 2013, 10:09
I run about 90 miles a week just now, if you like pasta, bean bakes and farting it is the life.

ON the subject of TV I got rid of a big chunk of sky just there, looking at the on demand showcase this morning and seeing Die Hard as a pay to view movie brought out a "that is ****** enough, where is that phone" response.

Ketchup
19th June 2013, 10:43
Prior to my expensive carbon bike I had a Specialized TriCross. You can put skinny tyres on it and it behaves pretty much like a road bike, or leave the standard ones on it and fly along canal tow paths. Because it's a cross bike the wheels are bomb proof too so they soak up the pot holes etc, and the carbon forks help with dampening the road buzz.

It also has mounting points for a panier rack if you decide to use it to commute with, and 'cheater' brakes for when you're riding on the tops instead of drops.

I had a Trek hybrid prior to that and although it was OK (the gearing wasn't high enough for going down hills fast) I didn't like the local Trek dealer.

As others have said, buy it through your company. It's a company vehicle then, but has no BIK as it's zero emission.

thank you, debating a trek 1.5, or maybe spending a little mroe to get over the flat-rate threshold.

I grew up eating at the table every night, now i can't actually eat on a sofa, it doesn't seem correct. The problem with TV is the way people use it, most people just put the tv on and channel hop tryign to find something to watch, i will only watch TV if there is something specific i want to watch (except when im getting ready for work when i put the news on). I will never channel hop, too many people now think they have to spend the evening on the sofa watching the idiot-box, it becomes second-nature to get into the living room and turn the TV on.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 10:47
thank you, debating a trek 1.5, or maybe spending a little mroe to get over the flat-rate threshold.

I grew up eating at the table every night, now i can't actually eat on a sofa, it doesn't seem correct. The problem with TV is the way people use it, most people just put the tv on and channel hop tryign to find something to watch, i will only watch TV if there is something specific i want to watch (except when im getting ready for work when i put the news on). I will never channel hop, too many people now think they have to spend the evening on the sofa watching the idiot-box, it becomes second-nature to get into the living room and turn the TV on.

A 2009/2010 Trek 1.5 had the same frame as the 1.9 and currently sells for about £300-400 on eBay. I would really recommend that; it was my first road bike, and excellent. The latter 1.5's had their own frame, which wasn't as good as the others. Go for a twin set too, not triple.

If you are looking at get over the £2k mark, your choice is a lot wider, but if you do want some advice, I'd be happy to advise, from my experience.

b0redom
19th June 2013, 10:54
Go for a twin set too, not triple.
Out of interest why?

Best thing to do is wander down to your local Evans/Cycle Surgery/ Specialized/Giant/Trek concept store and try a few out. I prefer to deal with Cycle Surgery as they'll price match everywhere (including online) and actually seem to be interested in bikes rather than just selling whatever they have to hand.

That being said - I bought my existing bike from the Giant concept store in Twickenham. I wandered in, and they measured me up, suggested a frame, ordered one in in my size, put me on a watt bike, built it up according to the measurements from the watt bike and let me take it around Richmond park for a couple of laps with no comittment to buy. I think Specialized in Kingston do the same, they certainly have loaners you can borrow.

Don't know where you are in the country though.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 11:27
Out of interest why?


I don't think you ever need a triple set unless you're going to do l'etape, or some serious climbing. A twin set will provide ample gears for normal use, and a triple set is heavier, more cumbersome, imo.

doodab
19th June 2013, 12:12
This is a fair point though folks; those blasted things waste huge chunks of your life. I've almost given up watching it at home. Loads more time to cook and eat well, ride my bike etc. Start by resolving never to eat a TV dinner and always sit down at the dinner table to eat together.

I binned tv a while ago, now I find CUK isn't busy enough to fill the time and I'm forced to read other websites.

Ketchup
19th June 2013, 12:19
Out of interest why?

Best thing to do is wander down to your local Evans/Cycle Surgery/ Specialized/Giant/Trek concept store and try a few out. I prefer to deal with Cycle Surgery as they'll price match everywhere (including online) and actually seem to be interested in bikes rather than just selling whatever they have to hand.

That being said - I bought my existing bike from the Giant concept store in Twickenham. I wandered in, and they measured me up, suggested a frame, ordered one in in my size, put me on a watt bike, built it up according to the measurements from the watt bike and let me take it around Richmond park for a couple of laps with no comittment to buy. I think Specialized in Kingston do the same, they certainly have loaners you can borrow.

Don't know where you are in the country though.

I'm in Essex (Chelmsford) but ClientCo is in London (Paddington)

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 12:33
I don't think you ever need a triple set unless you're going to do l'etape, or some serious climbing. A twin set will provide ample gears for normal use, and a triple set is heavier, more cumbersome, imo.

Yep, if you do a long day's tour ride (200+kms) and there are a few hills toward the end you'll be glad of a triple. It's OK riding uphill with a compact if you're fresh, but if you've already got 6 hours of riding in your legs it's a different matter altogether. You don't necessarily feel like your legs are really tired until suddenly you go up an easy looking hill and it feels like the bloody Matterhorn.

And don't fall for the 'triples are for wimps' argument; take a look at the tour de France or the Giro during the mountain stages and you'll see that some of those guys will have a triple on the really hard uphill days, and maybe they don't actually use it, but just have it in reserve in case 'the man with the hammer' hits them on a hill.

I've noticed since I started taking cycling seriously that there's a lot of macho guff talked by cyclists and it's a bit sad. When some bloke claims he rode up the Stelvio on 50/16 he's either bulltulipting or he's bulltulipting AND he spent 3 days in bed afterwards with no movement in his legs, or he's on EPO and he's bulltulipting.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 12:37
Yep, if you do a long day's tour ride (200+kms) and there are a few hills toward the end you'll be glad of a triple. It's OK riding uphill with a compact if you're fresh, but if you've already got 6 hours of riding in your legs it's a different matter altogether. You don't necessarily feel like your legs are really tired until suddenly you go up an easy looking hill and it feels like the bloody Matterhorn.

And don't fall for the 'triples are for wimps' argument; take a look at the tour de France or the Giro during the mountain stages and you'll see that some of those guys will have a triple on the really hard uphill days, and maybe they don't actually use it, but just have it in reserve in case 'the man with the hammer' hits them on a hill.

I've noticed since I started taking cycling seriously that there's a lot of macho guff talked by cyclists and it's a bit sad. When some bloke claims he rode up the Stelvio on 50/16 he's either bulltulipting or he's bulltulipting AND he spent 3 days in bed afterwards with no movement in his legs. Or he's on EPO and he's bulltulipting.

I do some very long rides, and I don't think, here, and especially chelmsford, has a hill for which you need a triple set for. It's not macho posturing, it's fact. I rode from Lands end to Deal in 4 days without a triple, and that's across Cornwall and Devon, which is about as hilly as it can get.

I am being genuinely serious, you really do not need a triple in this country.

Now, if you read what I said, it was, if you were going to attack l'etape, then I can see the value, as you will go up a bona fide mountain. But Essex? England? Really?

Don't buy a triple, it will be a waste of your money.


Edit MTT. How many people do you know, who will be riding 125+ miles, with hills at the end? A long training ride for me is 60 miles, across and about Dartmoor. Never needed a triple set. Normally, it's a couple of hours punting across the levels, which are about as flat as most of Holland. When we do a trip, it's normally 5-7 days in and around the UK. I have genuinely never needed a triple set. Ever. To be frank, I don't like getting down onto the lower set, as I feel that's my reserve. I don't get out of the saddle either mind, as I think once you're out, it's Custers last stand.

But no, never in the UK have I needed a triple, and I don't think I've met anyone else who needed one either.

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 12:51
I do some very long rides, and I don't think, here, and especially chelmsford, has a hill for which you need a triple set for. It's not macho posturing, it's fact. I rode from Lands end to Deal in 4 days without a triple, and that's across Cornwall and Devon, which is about as hilly as it can get.

I am being genuinely serious, you really do not need a triple in this country.

Now, if you read what I said, it was, if you were going to attack l'etape, then I can see the value, as you will go up a bona fide mountain. But Essex? England? Really?

Don't buy a triple, it will be a waste of your money.


Edit MTT. How many people do you know, who will be riding 125+ miles, with hills at the end? A long training ride for me is 60 miles, across and about Dartmoor. Never needed a triple set. Normally, it's a couple of hours punting across the levels, which are about as flat as most of Holland. When we do a trip, it's normally 5-7 days in and around the UK. I have genuinely never needed a triple set. Ever. To be frank, I don't like getting down onto the lower set, as I feel that's my reserve. I don't get out of the saddle either mind, as I think once you're out, it's Custers last stand.

But no, never in the UK have I needed a triple, and I don't think I've met anyone else who needed one either.

I must admit I've only really had one occasion to use it; at the end of a 200 km mass tour into Germany and back, the last hill, about 10km from home has a 1:9 stretch for about 100 metres. Dunno if I really needed it but I wanted to save myself for the last flat stretch; rode up the hillock in high cadence and was overtaken by a load of guys laughing 'ha ha ha he's riding his granny gear' and one that shouted 'you're nearly there now granny, one hill to go!' Alas for him and his laughing chums, it's a double hill and then a stretch against the prevailing wind along the riverbank where it's always a bit blowy, so once we got on the flat I gassed it and overtook the lot of them; had to restrain myself from shouting 'ha ha I used the granny gear'. It CAN be useful, on steep hills, and hills don't have to be big to be steep. I might well need it when I get round to some gran fondos though.

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 12:54
Edit MTT. How many people do you know, who will be riding 125+ miles, with hills at the end? A long training ride for me is 60 miles, across and about Dartmoor. Never needed a triple set. Normally, it's a couple of hours punting across the levels, which are about as flat as most of Holland. When we do a trip, it's normally 5-7 days in and around the UK. I have genuinely never needed a triple set. Ever. To be frank, I don't like getting down onto the lower set, as I feel that's my reserve. I don't get out of the saddle either mind, as I think once you're out, it's Custers last stand.

But no, never in the UK have I needed a triple, and I don't think I've met anyone else who needed one either.
I often ride 150 to 200 kms at a weekend and I have a few mates who do the same. As for getting out of the saddle, I do that if I really want to gas it uphill but not if it's a hard effort; best to just up the cadence and stay seated.

What knackers you on long rides in NL isn't the hillocks, it's the wind.

oracleslave
19th June 2013, 12:59
As for getting out of the saddle, .

Does that not use slightly different muscles and hence is recommended when doing long climbs to give your legs a break. It's what I was told but might be bollox.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 13:00
I often ride 150 to 200 kms at a weekend and I have a few mates who do the same. As for getting out of the saddle, I do that if I really want to gas it uphill but not if it's a hard effort; best to just up the cadence and stay seated.

What knackers you on long rides in NL isn't the hillocks, it's the wind.

Couldn't agree more to the bolded parts.

Getting out of the saddle is up to the individual. I just don't do it on the hills, preferring to push through it if we going steep. I have got out to crank it up sometimes, after a drink or snack.

You're in a select group doing those miles! I can't justify the 4/5 hours to be frank, so either pop in a couple of hours on the levels, a couple of times a week, which is about a 50 mile ride, or sometimes with some friends, we have a 2 monthly squirt around Dartmoor, which is more 4/6 hours.

On the levels, it's the wind too, for it comes off the channel straight across. Can be an arse, but conversely, can put you into some big numbers.

Some excellent pubs to cycle around the levels to, too.

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 13:03
Does that not use slightly different muscles and hence is recommended when doing long climbs to give your legs a break. It's what I was told but might be bollox.

I think it just uses more muscles; brings the quads into play and ' distributes the load' over several muscles as it were. Aerobically more demanding though as you've got to pump oxygen to a larger bulk of muscle, and not really for long climbs except perhaps accelerating out of bends. Unless of course you're a 60kg Italian who grew up in the Dolomites and you can dance up and down on the pedals all day, but most of us aren't that talented.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 13:05
I think it just uses more muscles; brings the quads into play and ' distributes the load' over several muscles as it were. Aerobically more demanding though as you've got to pump oxygen to a larger bulk of muscle, and not really for long climbs except perhaps accelerating out of bends. Unless of course you're a 60kg Italian who grew up in the Dolomites and you can dance up and down on the pedals all day, but most of us aren't that talented.

There's a 55 yo in our club; ex pro. He's about 50 kilos and lean. Can't touch him. But I am close to 40 kilos more, and on the hills, each one of them counts....

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 13:05
Couldn't agree more to the bolded parts.

Getting out of the saddle is up to the individual. I just don't do it on the hills, preferring to push through it if we going steep. I have got out to crank it up sometimes, after a drink or snack.

You're in a select group doing those miles! I can't justify the 4/5 hours to be frank, so either pop in a couple of hours on the levels, a couple of times a week, which is about a 50 mile ride, or sometimes with some friends, we have a 2 monthly squirt around Dartmoor, which is more 4/6 hours.

On the levels, it's the wind too, for it comes off the channel straight across. Can be an arse, but conversely, can put you into some big numbers.

Some excellent pubs to cycle around the levels to, too.

Yep, currently cycling about 30km each day from hotel to clientco and back so I'm up to 400 kms a week including a long ride at the weekend. I'd probably lose another stone if the landlady didn't keep cooking steak and chips, beef stews, spag bol etc.

I need to get a new group methinks with this mileage; currently riding a 105 and it needs more and more adjustment and maintenance, but after only a couple of months back in contracting the prices of all that dura-ace or super-record stuff still make me gasp a bit.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 13:14
Yep, currently cycling about 30km each day from hotel to clientco and back. I'd probably lose another stone if the landlady didn't keep cooking steak and chips, beef stews, spag bol etc.

I need to get a new group methinks with this mileage; currently riding a 105 and it needs more and more adjustment and maintenance, but after only a couple of months back in contracting the prices of all that dura-ace or super-record stuff still make me gasp a bit.

What are you using? I jam looking at a SRAM Force groupset, but it's a lot of money, and the wife isn't going to like it.

Currently Boris biking twixt south and north london, but the curries, the curries....

b0redom
19th June 2013, 13:15
To be honest OH, if you're 90kg, I don't think you'll notice the extra few grammes of an additional cog. I got a double on this bike (tricross was a triple), and I think cycling up Bar Hatch Lane (21%), Leith Hill etc would be a lot easier in granny gear. I guess it's about flexibiliy.

I'm probably the same weight as you, and it would be far easier for me to drop 5kg off me, and have the added flexibility of another ring. Don't want to upgrade the groupset just yet though.

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 13:18
What are you using? I jam looking at a SRAM Force groupset, but it's a lot of money, and the wife isn't going to like it.

Currently Boris biking twixt south and north london, but the curries, the curries....

Cannondale Caad 9 with the standard Shimano 105. Great frame but the groupset is getting a bit worn. The guy at the bike shop says it would be cheaper to just buy a new Caad 10 than replace the group, but that frame just works perfectly for me and I've become somewhat attached to the whole feel of the bike. I guess that's just a very personal thing. Plus; it's one of the last Cannondales that was handbuilt in the US, which is expected to make it a collectors item in future.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 13:20
To be honest OH, if you're 90kg, I don't think you'll notice the extra few grammes of an additional cog. I got a double on this bike (tricross was a triple), and I think cycling up Bar Hatch Lane (21%), Leith Hill etc would be a lot easier in granny gear. I guess it's about flexibiliy.

I'm probably the same weight as you, and it would be far easier for me to drop 5kg off me, and have the added flexibility of another ring. Don't want to upgrade the groupset just yet though.

It's all opinion, but I've never needed it. I am about 86 kg's, moving up to 87-88 if I have had a bad week, 83-84 if I've been good. I just think it's frivolous. I talked a couple of friends out of buying a triple and they agree with me, after running both. It's simply not hilly enough to make that difference, to me, and if you're blowing going up a hill, you're going to be blowing with the slightly lower gear. I simply can't see the difference.

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 13:21
It's all opinion, but I've never needed it. I am about 86 kg's, moving up to 87-88 if I have had a bad week, 83-84 if I've been good. I just think it's frivolous. I talked a couple of friends out of buying a triple and they agree with me, after running both. It's simply not hilly enough to make that difference, to me, and if you're blowing going up a hill, you're going to be blowing with the slightly lower gear. I simply can't see the difference.

I've lost 13kg since stopping rugby, but that still leaves me at 91kg. But one thing I've always been able to do is move my legs quickly as I did a lot of sprinting, so I can get some benefit from a lower gear and just ride high cadence.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 13:22
Cannondale Caad 9 with the standard Shimano 105. Great frame but the groupset is getting a bit worn. The guy at the bike shop says it would be cheaper to just buy a new Caad 10 than replace the group, but that frame just works perfectly for me and I've become somewhat attached to the whole feel of the bike. I guess that's just a very personal thing. Plus; it's one of the last Cannondales that was handbuilt in the US, which is expected to make it a collectors item in future.

I've had too much trouble with Shimanos, so don't buy them.

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 13:25
I've had too much trouble with Shimanos, so don't buy them.

Dunno, I hear all sorts about the different brands. Someone said he had less trouble with Campagnolo but ordering parts was a pain as they take weeks to deliver. One completely frivolous benefit with SRAM and Campagnolo; their derailleurs aren't so bleeding ugly as the Shimano stuff.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 13:30
I've lost 13kg since stopping rugby, but that still leaves me at 91kg. But one thing I've always been able to do is move my legs quickly as I did a lot of sprinting, so I can get some benefit from a lower gear and just ride high cadence.

I am always told my cadence is too low, and gear too high, but it’s how I ride. I prefer putting the power through, rather than upping the cadence, as when I need to up the cadence, I can, if that makes sense? I guess we’re all weird in one way or another.

I wasn’t far shy of 100 kilos when I played rugby. Now very happy at 85 ish, apart from on Dartmoor with the noodle armed gang...

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 13:34
Dunno, I hear all sorts about the different brands. Someone said he had less trouble with Campagnolo but ordering parts was a pain as they take weeks to deliver. One completely frivolous benefit with SRAM and Campagnolo; their derailleurs aren't so bleeding ugly as the Shimano stuff.

I like Campagnolos, I must admit, probably from the old days, they were the gear to have (pun not intended) Good friend in Pau sells retro bike parts, and makes a fortune...

SRAM looks good too, but, whooosh, what, £1300?

Mich the Tester
19th June 2013, 13:35
I am always told my cadence is too low, and gear too high, but it’s how I ride. I prefer putting the power through, rather than upping the cadence, as when I need to up the cadence, I can, if that makes sense? I guess we’re all weird in one way or another.



Oh there are so many theorists who'll tell you you should ride higher or lower cadence, just as there are so many theorists in rugby who rattle on about 'quick ball from rucks' and 'run with the ball in two hands' and so on without knowing or even caring about the strengths and weaknesses of the individual or the team. You even have them in athletics philosophizing on which leg should be used to start a sprint. Seeing as I'm no longer obliged to do what I'm told by coaches and the like, I don't take much notice of the armchair philosophers. I ride a pretty constant cadence that's a bit higher than most tourers and it works for me, and when I need to push some power I've got the legs to do it. Do what feels right for you.

doodab
19th June 2013, 13:58
To be honest OH, if you're 90kg, I don't think you'll notice the extra few grammes of an additional cog. I got a double on this bike (tricross was a triple), and I think cycling up Bar Hatch Lane (21%), Leith Hill etc would be a lot easier in granny gear. I guess it's about flexibiliy.

I'm probably the same weight as you, and it would be far easier for me to drop 5kg off me, and have the added flexibility of another ring. Don't want to upgrade the groupset just yet though.

You could also look at a compact chainset.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 14:01
I get a bit too obsessed with weight cycling in summer, as I am out more, so I look to carry less, and that obviously means me losing as well.

b0redom
19th June 2013, 14:04
You could also look at a compact chainset.

Thought about that, or perhaps a cassette with a wider range. In the end though, I'll probably just have a cup of concrete and harden the feck up.

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 14:05
Thought about that, or perhaps a cassette with a wider range. In the end though, I'll probably just have a cup of concrete and harden the feck up.

That's the way ;)

shaunbhoy
19th June 2013, 14:42
I'm amazed you fit it all in. Gym, swimming, two clients paying £900/day, reading endless math books, doing an Msc, driving your Toyota sports car, going on holiday, staying in your villa in Portugal, spending time with your sprog.....all combined with 10 hours straight shift of telling us all about it on CUK......

:rolleyes:

All done through careful Mittytasking.

HTH

:laugh

Old Hack
19th June 2013, 15:00
All done through careful Mittytasking.

HTH

:laugh

:laugh

Trademark that now SB :laugh

Ketchup
24th June 2013, 07:21
I picked up a Trek 1.5 yesterday, need to get a few bits (helmet, water bottles) then will take it out for a spin tomorrow.

Old Hack
24th June 2013, 07:28
I picked up a Trek 1.5 yesterday, need to get a few bits (helmet, water bottles) then will take it out for a spin tomorrow.

Older model or new? Triple or twinset?

Ketchup
24th June 2013, 07:43
Older model or new? Triple or twinset?

2010 twin

b0redom
24th June 2013, 08:03
Make sure you also buy some padded shorts. I prefer the bib ones as they are not tight and uncomfortable around my waist. You might look like a bit of a nob, but it's WAAAAY more comfortable than cycling with no padding.

Old Hack
24th June 2013, 19:38
2010 twin

Top bike, top, top bike, you'll do well with that. The best part about that trek, is it had the same frame as the 1.9, and that means it's a cracking frame.

mudskipper
24th June 2013, 19:43
So is it worth getting a heart rate monitor? What will it do for me if I do?

Old Hack
24th June 2013, 19:48
So is it worth getting a heart rate monitor? What will it do for me if I do?

A good Garmin will do you the world of good, for if you do the same rides, you can save them, and notice your hart rate slowly come down, the fitter you get. One ride I did, I used to peak at around 168 (and the monitor had an alarm that would be going off). Once properly fit, I struggled to get it above 110 on the same ride. You can map them as well, log the changes, see how you're doing. The Sunday times had some crackers this weekend, with associated apps for smartphones, which logged everything.

mudskipper
24th June 2013, 20:04
A good Garmin will do you the world of good, for if you do the same rides, you can save them, and notice your hart rate slowly come down, the fitter you get. One ride I did, I used to peak at around 168 (and the monitor had an alarm that would be going off). Once properly fit, I struggled to get it above 110 on the same ride. You can map them as well, log the changes, see how you're doing. The Sunday times had some crackers this weekend, with associated apps for smartphones, which logged everything.

Got a garmin watch for running, and a satnav for the bike, so I already log all the rides, compare times etc. Just the HR stuff I haven't got. I can get a compatible monitor for about £30 I think, just not sure how much it'll help.

doodab
24th June 2013, 20:44
So is it worth getting a heart rate monitor? What will it do for me if I do?

Monitor your heart rate?

I have a suunto one and it tells you your average and peak heart rate, calories burned and so on. It also has a timer and various alarms you can set if your heart rate goes out of a defined range and so on, so it's handy for interval training, or for ensuring you're working at a particular level of intensity. I also like to keep an eye on it and make sure I'm not overdoing it, as I have done in the past and made myself quite ill.

Dallas
25th June 2013, 07:30
Got a garmin watch for running, and a satnav for the bike, so I already log all the rides, compare times etc. Just the HR stuff I haven't got. I can get a compatible monitor for about £30 I think, just not sure how much it'll help.

Indicator of sickness, tiredness and when you are on form it is a gear indicator

so for me if i am exceeding 155 on a marathon run i know i am overheating and and cannot complete at thet rate, so i need to back off. Same on the bike, i need to average at 145 or i wont have anything left for the run.

Its just an indicator, you can choose how to be anal about it, most normal people go off percieved threshold - if that works thats great too. I have a polar that is linked to my health insurance and gym membership if i submit an hour a day via the HRM the cost of the gym and health insurance come down - so its a gievn for me that I'll use it :)

if you do get one, get used to your gears then take powder/drink argenin - that makes it more interesting :)