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MilanB
15th June 2005, 19:07
Tessa Jowell, the Culture Secretary, is in discussions with the Home Office and Department of Trade and Industry to introduce legislation to counter reselling tickets at astronomical prices. (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1654620,00.html)

Should be interesting, I wonder what else thay can think of banning ?

Milan.

AtW
15th June 2005, 19:19
> I wonder what else thay can think of banning ?

Ban lazy people who can't be arsed to copy/paste the article?

Do you have any idea Milan about optimisations? Did it not occur to you that for ever poster there are many more readers, so its much more efficiently for just one person, ie original posters, to copy/paste article rather than make others click on link, wait for it to download etc?

DimPrawn
15th June 2005, 19:20
I think we should ban all 2nd hand sales and auctions and, @#%$ it BAN EVERYTHING in some knee jerk leftie control-freakery @#%$ way.

MilanB
15th June 2005, 19:20
Alexey,

how come your spider hasn't crawled over my website yet ?

Milan.

MilanB
15th June 2005, 19:22
is Tessa (my sone goes to a private school) Jowell suggesting that the government should impose a cap on ticket prices ?

and where would it end, I can see it now...

shirts can cost no more than x

watches can cost no more than y

all in the interests of fairness.

Milan.

AtW
15th June 2005, 19:41
> how come your spider hasn't crawled over my website yet ?

There are plenty of sites out there, why should your site be any better than others? I am pretty sure it is not, because crawler now gets sites that were linked to. Consequently it is clear that nobody links to you :lol

MilanB
15th June 2005, 20:03
oh dear, you listing is going to be as bad as google

I'll stick with www.Teoma.com thanks.

Milan.

AtW
15th June 2005, 20:15
Teoma sucks arse Milan. :rolleyes

MilanB
15th June 2005, 20:16
no son,

teoma spews out useful results

google has been reduced to shite for a lot of searches

Milan.

AtW
15th June 2005, 20:34
I still use Google, but will soon use "dog-food", switch to my own search engine. Google is definately getting broken.

Lucifer Box
16th June 2005, 08:04
Tessa Jowell, the Culture Secretary, is in discussions with the Home Office and Department of Trade and Industry to introduce legislation to counter reselling tickets at astronomical prices.
Excellent, market price controls Soviet style. This is only the start, mark my words. Still, it should please Comrade BGG.

As it is conceivable (albeit barely) that some people might actually declare profits from ticket resales on their tax returns, might this be a first for a Labour government to institute a policy that will actually decrease the tax take?

Board Game Geek
16th June 2005, 10:05
Excellent, market price controls Soviet style. This is only the start, mark my words. Still, it should please Comrade BGG.

I'm not sure...one half of me accepts the market and competitor model, where prices are kept in check and balance.

Eg, an xx-inch telly costs about the same wherever you go. The manufacturer has an RRP, and the shops vary this a little way either side. But mostly the sales prices is within certain limits.

On the other hand, what I don't want to see is traders having carte blanche to charge as much as they can get away with or price-fixing using cartels.

Given that one aspect of human nature is based on greed, I do think there needs to be some external moderation to keep us within tolerable limits.

You might say that a business has the right to charge what it perceives as a fair and equitable price for it's goods. I can't refute that, but I would point out that fair and equitable depends upon the perciver, and the market as a whole.

Ok, so it's probable that the market will avoid the business that charges way over the odds, but what happens when there is no alternative supplier ?

Imagine I made a device which allowed you to roll back the last 10 seconds of time for you in your personal time bubble.

Assuming that such a device would even be wanted by the market itself, what should I sell it at ?

10 million ? 20 million ? More ?

I would suggest that if this device had commercial appeal, then an affordable pricing model would be more ethically sound, than alienating the majority of the market for your own personal gain.

expat
16th June 2005, 10:24
Ok, so it's probable that the market will avoid the business that charges way over the odds, but what happens when there is no alternative supplier ?Don't buy.

HTH

BlasterBates
16th June 2005, 10:28
Well I think all the mechanisms are there to stop this kind of thing, just look at the massive court case against Microsoft.

BGG is quite right ocasionally a company becomes too powerful and needs knocking down to size, wasn't the telephone Bell corporation divided up?.

Usually if you have a new product you take out a patent that lasts so many years then all the competitors pile in, I'm not sure what the protection is on a patent, and I suppose the competitors pay royalties, anyway that's how pharmaceutical companies work.

Board Game Geek
16th June 2005, 10:31
Don't buy

That's a flippant answer Spod and you know it !

I'm sure you are well aware that some services are considered to be essential, like water and electricity. Not buying these services is an almost impossible option for 99.99% of the population.

NumptyCorner
16th June 2005, 10:32
It's already illegal to sell tickets without a license in most cities. In Scotland it is illegal to tout. It's illegal to resell football tickets full stop.

So why should it be allowed in the Internet? Moreover, How many of these tickets are Genuine?

Lucifer Box
16th June 2005, 13:46
Imagine I made a device which allowed you to roll back the last 10 seconds of time for you in your personal time bubble.
No need to imagine, just ask Threaded. He did that years ago.

I'm sure there's sense in this somewhere, I just have difficulty accepting that a ticket should be subject to different treatment to any other commodity. It's not like water or electricity, so why shouldn't it be like beans or radios? Otherwise it's "I have a ticket, I don't want it or can't go - too bad, chum."

mikethebike
16th June 2005, 14:16
Thought I would pop by to see how things were going after about a year away (can't remember the last time I posted....can anyone help with that?).
Its like an old pair of comfy pants....the usual suspects are still here, and as soon as I saw the "Oh Dear" trademark posting I didn't even have to look at who started this thread!!!

BlasterBates
16th June 2005, 14:25
..hey Mike, I think longer than a year.

If I remember rightly you were posting in the Summer of 2003, then found a permie job...

never to be seen again... :eek *ghostly echo* again...again

mikethebike
17th June 2005, 07:28
Blaster,

you could be right. I went Permie in Oct 2003...bloody hell....almost 2 years in one place! Bit of a struggle on my measly permie salary....better than sitting at home like I did for 9 months picking my nose though.

I see Atw has even surpassed Milan's posting volume...14,000 for chrisakes! Mind you...is Milan still posting under 38 different pseudonyms...combined he would probably reach that!

widgetdance
17th June 2005, 07:42
According to your profile, your last post was on (9/20/04 9:06 am) apart from the latest 2. HTH :D

MilanB
17th June 2005, 07:51
^
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anorak !

hello Mike how are you, been out with the caravan lately ?

Milan.

expat
17th June 2005, 11:02
Ok, so it's probable that the market will avoid the business that charges way over the oddsTo be more precise, if the market doesn't avoid it, then by definition it is not charging over the odds.

expat
17th June 2005, 11:10
Quote:
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Don't buy
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That's a flippant answer Spod and you know it !

I'm sure you are well aware that some services are considered to be essential, like water and electricity. Not buying these services is an almost impossible option for 99.99% of the population.No, it isn't. The real answer is just a bit longer, but the principle is the same.

The market price is set by how much all potential sellers are prepared to sell for, and how much all potential buyers are prepared to buy for. That's why the price of necessities wouldn't become astronomical: you can always go to other sellers.

Of course, if the government doesn't allow that, you're faced with a racket. Can't help you there.

But if you can choose suppliers, then the price you pay is not way over the odds: if it were, some other seller would pop up with a better price.

And few things are necessities. Water is, but tap water is not. Electricity is not. Entertainment tickets certainly are not: you cannot be held to ransom over them. Just don't buy them if the price is too high.

JS
17th June 2005, 12:27
Has nobody else realised that this is EXACTLY what the official sellers want so they can INCREASE the prices they get !!!!!

Once the scumverment has made tickets individual - tied to ID so that nasty, evil touts can't make money from them look then look out for the "closer to the day, higher the price" pricing model coming straight in entertainment tickets.

SupremeSpod
17th June 2005, 12:45
That's a flippant answer Spod and you know it !

I'm sure you are well aware that some services are considered to be essential, like water and electricity. Not buying these services is an almost impossible option for 99.99% of the population.

Don't blame me matey, I didn't post that, it was EXPAT!

expat
17th June 2005, 13:26
tickets individual - tied to IDAh, I knew ID cards were good for something!

Lucifer Box
17th June 2005, 13:30
Listen, comrades, market price controls in the only way to go in New Labour's one party police state (corporate slogan: "If you've done nothing wrong, you have nothing to fear). This ticketing thing is just a pilot scheme for the inevitable day when we're all flipping burgers, stacking shelves, cutting hair and can no longer afford to pay the market rate for any of the products produced offshore in China.

We will all have a happiness quota as well.