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Jog On
11th March 2014, 15:13
Thinking of learning now I'm the wrong side of 40...

Any CUK golfers got any tips?

Pondlife
11th March 2014, 15:17
Thinking of learning now I'm the wrong side of 40...

Any CUK golfers got any tips?

Don't spend any real money until you know you like it and have time to play.

Get yourself a 7 iron from your local sports emporium for about a tenner and find a driving range where you can get some lessons.

doodab
11th March 2014, 15:19
Thinking of learning now I'm the wrong side of 40...

Any CUK golfers got any tips?

Start off gentle. It can be quite hard on the back, shoulders and arms.if you're not used to it.

Get lessons with a pro. You'll improve quicker and reduce the chances of hurting yourself.

You have to spunk a fortune on top bollocks clubs before you have a clue. All middle aged golfers do this.

GlenW
11th March 2014, 15:19
Best fact I know about golf, via Tom Clancy, is why golf is called golf.

Because sh1t was already taken.

oracleslave
11th March 2014, 15:20
Thinking of learning now I'm the wrong side of 40...

Any CUK golfers got any tips?

Get lessons right from the start so that you don't teach yourself bad habits. No use bashing buckets of balls on the range if you're using the wrong technique.

If you're near South London, I think the World of Golf offered a free set of 6 lessons last summer for those looking to start so might be worth checking out before committing too much cash.

EDIT: http://www.worldofgolf.co.uk/web/guest/beginners-golf-new-malden

doodab
11th March 2014, 15:22
Don't spend any real money until you know you like it and have time to play.

Get yourself a 7 iron from your local sports emporium for about a tenner and find a driving range where you can get some lessons.

Or a seven and putter and find a local course with a pitch and putt. Council run ones are often good value.

darmstadt
11th March 2014, 15:24
Make sure your golf cart has a fridge...

mudskipper
11th March 2014, 15:24
Go for the left tunnel on the windmill, not the middle one.

Mich the Tester
11th March 2014, 15:27
Save yourself some effort and expense; just buy a golf club blazer and stand in the pub telling long boring stories but don't bother playing the game.

hyperD
11th March 2014, 15:29
Thinking of learning now I'm the wrong side of 40...

Any CUK golfers got any tips?

The reason the golf pro tells you to keep your head down is so you can't see him laughing.

darmstadt
11th March 2014, 15:32
I used to drink in a pub where the barman was also a golf pro and quite a few of the customers played golf so lessons were given during the quiet periods. Eventually came the day that we decided to try it for real, I was knackered after the 14th hole and so had to skip to the 19th hole. Pitch and Putt, Mini Golf and Crazy Golf are my limits now...

doodab
11th March 2014, 15:33
You should always hit your balls with your wood when hoping to get close to the hole.

Mich the Tester
11th March 2014, 15:44
You should always hit your balls with your wood when hoping to get close to the hole.

I'd be worried if my wood was bendy enough for that.

NorthWestPerm2Contr
11th March 2014, 15:52
Best fact I know about golf, via Tom Clancy, is why golf is called golf.

Because sh1t was already taken.

:confused:

Doggy Styles
11th March 2014, 15:53
Thinking of learning now I'm the wrong side of 40...

Any CUK golfers got any tips?It's a great sport you can do into old age.

And, except for some of the snobby clubs, it's good for social life. Especially if they have a ladies section.

NorthWestPerm2Contr
11th March 2014, 15:54
Thinking of learning now I'm the wrong side of 40...

Any CUK golfers got any tips?

Just the wrong side of 30 here.... Took up tennis a few months ago and started to get pretty good at it. Took private/group lessons and played a lot. Unfortunately got a wrist injury now :frown

Have you considered that as opposed to Golf? Better for your health, can be played in doors all year round (If you sign up to David Lloyd like myself), a lot more action happening as opposed to just walking for miles. I see Golf as a retirement sport more than a working man's sport - a few of my friends took it up who are in their 20s and not married, no kids. I just can't find the time to spend full days playing it.

Jog On
11th March 2014, 16:05
Just the wrong side of 30 here.... Took up tennis a few months ago and started to get pretty good at it. Took private/group lessons and played a lot. Unfortunately got a wrist injury now :frown

Have you considered that as opposed to Golf? Better for your health, can be played in doors all year round (If you sign up to David Lloyd like myself), a lot more action happening as opposed to just walking for miles. I see Golf as a retirement sport more than a working man's sport - a few of my friends took it up who are in their 20s and not married, no kids. I just can't find the time to spend full days playing it.

I go to the gym quite a bit (David Lloyd) and do martial arts (wing chun - will do black t-shirt this December).

I'm thinking more of a fun/social type of activity to get into on my impending extended summer holiday :D

Think I might start here - Jurassic Golf (http://www.jurassicencounter.com/)

I live quite near World of Golf as well and my David Lloyd has a course with classes as well.

Jog On
11th March 2014, 16:06
Get lessons right from the start so that you don't teach yourself bad habits. No use bashing buckets of balls on the range if you're using the wrong technique.

If you're near South London, I think the World of Golf offered a free set of 6 lessons last summer for those looking to start so might be worth checking out before committing too much cash.

EDIT: World of Golf | New Malden | Beginners Golf Lessons - www.worldofgolf.co.uk (http://www.worldofgolf.co.uk/web/guest/beginners-golf-new-malden)

Tidy :banana:

gricerboy
11th March 2014, 16:49
I would concentrate on your long game first of all. Probably best to get yourself a 7 iron and head down to your local driving range as others have said.

Once you've got your long game working, you'll need to concentrate on your short game.

To perfect this, I'd recommend practicing on fast greens. The greens at my local club are as smooth as a baby's bum and are VERY fast. The way I play fast greens is to use a technique I call spot putting. Imagine you have a 30 foot putt. Then imagine your ball is just 1 yard from the hole and hit the ball with just enough force to make that imaginary hole. 9 times out of 10 the ball will have the legs to reach the hole but won't overrun.

However, as others have said I can't stress how imporant it is to have someone right behind you at all times as you get your golfing career on track.


http://www.intotherough.co.uk/assets/_files/images/jul_08/itr__1215942545_LDN20070520dr_golf.jpg

d000hg
11th March 2014, 16:51
I'd be worried if my wood was bendy enough for that.But I bet if you got hit in the balls it would go bendy.


It's a great sport you can do into old age.

And, except for some of the snobby clubs, it's good for social life. Especially if they have a ladies section.To add humour, something to laugh at?

Doggy Styles
11th March 2014, 17:01
But I bet if you got hit in the balls it would go bendy.

To add humour, something to laugh at?:laugh

No, although old Jack at my son's golf club did cross my mind when I wrote that. The portraits of past lady captains staring out at you in the clubhouse include several of his sexual conquests.

DodgyAgent
11th March 2014, 17:40
I go to the gym quite a bit (David Lloyd) and do martial arts (wing chun - will do black t-shirt this December).

I'm thinking more of a fun/social type of activity to get into on my impending extended summer holiday :D

Think I might start here - Jurassic Golf (http://www.jurassicencounter.com/)

I live quite near World of Golf as well and my David Lloyd has a course with classes as well.

Golf is so boring it needs to be played in the middle of a dinosaur park to make it interesting... says it all

doodab
11th March 2014, 19:28
Golf is so boring it needs to be played in the middle of a dinosaur park to make it interesting... says it all

It's great for the kids. I often take my eldest there with it being so local, they do a good value family pass over the winter, something like £50 for unlimited use from November - February. It pays for itself in a weekend.

Freaki Li Cuatre
12th March 2014, 07:51
I would concentrate on your long game first of all. Probably best to get yourself a 7 iron and head down to your local driving range as others have said.

Once you've got your long game working, you'll need to concentrate on your short game.

To perfect this, I'd recommend practicing on fast greens. The greens at my local club are as smooth as a baby's bum and are VERY fast. The way I play fast greens is to use a technique I call spot putting. Imagine you have a 30 foot putt. Then imagine your ball is just 1 yard from the hole and hit the ball with just enough force to make that imaginary hole. 9 times out of 10 the ball will have the legs to reach the hole but won't overrun.

However, as others have said I can't stress how imporant it is to have someone right behind you at all times as you get your golfing career on track.


http://www.intotherough.co.uk/assets/_files/images/jul_08/itr__1215942545_LDN20070520dr_golf.jpg

I can't help but think that there's something else going on in that pic :eek

shaunbhoy
12th March 2014, 08:18
Get lessons right from the start so that you don't teach yourself bad habits.

THIS x 100!!!

Very difficult to change bad techniques once they are embedded.
Might also be worth getting a book on just what causes slices and hooks etc. as a bit of knowledge of why they are happening can help you overcome them.

Good Luck with it!!

Pogle
12th March 2014, 08:58
I can't help but think that there's something else going on in that pic :eek

Sweetie, I think thats the point :laugh

Scruff
12th March 2014, 10:02
OK, I'll bite...

I play golf, regularly. I am not sure where you are based, but there are umpteen facilities nationwide where you can "try before you buy"?

I am Surrey based and as a start, if you are nearby, Silvermere Golf centre in Cobham/Weybridge has an execellent introduction to golf

https://www.silvermere-golf.co.uk/golf/private-lessons/

I would highly advise NOT to buy a golf club and try and teach yourself, or take "Lessons" from a friend. Unlearning bad habits is nigh on impossible after you have developed the wrong muscle memory...

MicrosoftBob
12th March 2014, 10:15
I think Mark Twain had it right, golf is a good walk spoilt

original PM
12th March 2014, 12:40
Ok couple of things from me

1) You need to commit to give the sport at least 3 years before you expect to start being what would be remotely called good.

2) Before you get lessons or anything read a book - some pro's will try and teach you how to swing like them which is not the best way. You need to understand the mechanics of what you are trying to do and then learn to swing a club to do it. (note you are not trying to hit a ball you are trying to consistently swing a club in the same way - the ball just happens to be in the way)

3) You can get a decent set of golf bats for £150 (new) pay no more until you are good

4) 18 holes can be quite tiring - and what happens is that you end up rushing the last 5-6 holes cos you are bored/tired/pissed off - so start off just doing 9 holes.

5) Do regularly go to the driving range - however in a real round of golf maybe 50% of your shots will be putts - which most people rarely practice so try n practice them

DodgyAgent
12th March 2014, 12:44
Taking the p*** out of SASguru is a much easier and much more entertaining sport than golf :laugh

oracleslave
12th March 2014, 13:22
Ok couple of things from me

1) You need to commit to give the sport at least 3 years before you expect to start being what would be remotely called good.


I'd agree that it is not a sport that one can pick up quickly and easily. I have known people to become decent players within 18 months though




2) Before you get lessons or anything read a book - some pro's will try and teach you how to swing like them which is not the best way. You need to understand the mechanics of what you are trying to do and then learn to swing a club to do it.

I disagree. I don't believe a complete novice will be able to achieve much from a book. Books can be useful for giving new ideas and potential things to try once you have a swing foundation.



(note you are not trying to hit a ball you are trying to consistently swing a club in the same way - the ball just happens to be in the way)


This is very true and something that a god coach will emphasise.




5) Do regularly go to the driving range - however in a real round of golf maybe 50% of your shots will be putts - which most people rarely practice so try n practice them

I would only regularly go to the driving range with a specific goal in mind and not just to aimlessly bash a 100 balls. Putting can come later. A beginner needs the swing fundamentals in place first and imho the best place to get that is through professional instruction.

Gittins Gal
12th March 2014, 13:28
This is very true and something that a god coach will emphasise.


Is that Dhoogie?

Doggy Styles
12th March 2014, 22:46
I would concentrate on your long game first of all. Probably best to get yourself a 7 iron and head down to your local driving range as others have said.

Once you've got your long game working, you'll need to concentrate on your short game.

To perfect this, I'd recommend practicing on fast greens. The greens at my local club are as smooth as a baby's bum and are VERY fast. The way I play fast greens is to use a technique I call spot putting. Imagine you have a 30 foot putt. Then imagine your ball is just 1 yard from the hole and hit the ball with just enough force to make that imaginary hole. 9 times out of 10 the ball will have the legs to reach the hole but won't overrun.

However, as others have said I can't stress how imporant it is to have someone right behind you at all times as you get your golfing career on track.Hi Gricer! :wave:

I found that practicing with one's short irons is just as important as the long. This is because, having arrived anywhere within 100 yards of your target by whatever means, a good "pitch" can put you very close to the hole and get you "up and down".

Long clubs are about controlling your swing plane at speed. Short clubs are more about touch and feel, especially your putter. Putting practice, often neglected because it isn't as much fun as a hearty bit of swinging, is vital for getting your score down. As we golfers say, "Drive for show, putt for dough!"