Boris gets the check book out. Boris gets the check book out. - Page 2
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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by original PM View Post
    Except earning 60k a year will make you far from rich.
    The Prime Minister is paid £150,402 a year. This includes the basic salary for a member of parliament which is currently £74,962. It doesn't factor in the value of the Prime Minister's flat in Downing Street, or her other official residences.


    Since April 2016 the Prime Minister has been entitled to a slightly higher amount, £152,532.

    The mayor of London, Boris Johnson, has dismissed the £250,000-a-year he earns from a controversial second job as "chicken feed".
    Brexit is having a wee in the middle of the room at a house party because nobody is talking to you, and then complaining about the smell.

  2. #12

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    Mortgage - 1100 <-- Really?

    Well if you want a simple 3 bed semi then that is 280000 (where I am) which equates to about 1100 per month.

    You could pay less - but then you end up in a less salubrious environment with worse schools and higher crime

    and if you earn 60k a year that is not what you want for your kids?

    Maybe I am wrong though.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by darmstadt View Post
    Ah, the bribe to rich Tory members to vote for him...not a surprising more really, typical Tory
    What [Johnson] has said is that he wants to raise the point at which you start to pay higher rate tax to £80,000. But at the same time, and this does make sense, you would increase the national insurance ceiling to the same level. So the net cost would be in the order of £10bn a year. That’s obviously a lot of money. It helps the 10% highest earners. And it is worth saying that the group who would benefit the most would be the high-income pensioners who don’t pay national insurance at all. So there’s a particular group who do particularly well - that’s those over the age of state pension age with more than £80,000 a year.
    By remarkable coincidence, wealthy pensioners are disproportionately represented amongst the Conservative party membership, the group that will select the next leader. According to https://www.qmul.ac.uk/media/qmul/me...ty-Members.pdf by academics from the Mile End Institute, the average age of Conservative party members is 57 and 44% of them are above the age of 65. The same study says 86% of members are social class ABC1 (ie, middle class).
    Brexit is having a wee in the middle of the room at a house party because nobody is talking to you, and then complaining about the smell.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by original PM View Post
    Mortgage - 1100 <-- Really?

    Well if you want a simple 3 bed semi then that is 280000 (where I am) which equates to about 1100 per month.

    You could pay less - but then you end up in a less salubrious environment with worse schools and higher crime

    and if you earn 60k a year that is not what you want for your kids?

    Maybe I am wrong though.
    Average earnings rise by 2-4% per year, but your mortgage doesn't.

    Buying a house was always a struggle, but after 5-10 years it's no problem.
    I'm alright Jack

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlasterBates View Post
    Average earnings rise by 2-4% per year, but your mortgage doesn't.

    Buying a house was always a struggle, but after 5-10 years it's no problem.
    2-4%!!!!!???? I don't think they have risen by that much for quite a while now, at least not for the average Jo in the street. Ask a nurse/teacher how much their average rise has been over the past 5 years.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yorkie62 View Post
    2-4%!!!!!???? I don't think they have risen by that much for quite a while now, at least not for the average Jo in the street. Ask a nurse/teacher how much their average rise has been over the past 5 years.
    Employee earnings in the UK - Office for National Statistics
    Brexit is having a wee in the middle of the room at a house party because nobody is talking to you, and then complaining about the smell.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yorkie62 View Post
    2-4%!!!!!???? I don't think they have risen by that much for quite a while now, at least not for the average Jo in the street. Ask a nurse/teacher how much their average rise has been over the past 5 years.
    Yes they have, we're talking average earnings. They went up by 3.6% last year.
    I'm alright Jack

  8. #18

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    Yep thanks for that. Lots of interesting statistics. One headline caught my eye. "Earnings growth was highest in 2018 in the lowest-paid occupations" but only in percentage terms, i.e. 4.4% of between £15k and £25K is £660 to £1100 per annum. Where as highest earners (Managers, Director, Senior Officials) who only got a poultry 1.5% of their earnings (25K to 95K) got between £1100 and £4180 per annum.

    4.4% of FA is still FA.

    In real terms when adjusted for inflation it is still only just over 1%. So the lowest earners got between £165 and £275 per annum before tax and NI, or between (Assuming a 1.1% increase in real terms) £12.69 and £21.15 per week. I hope they don't spend it all at once.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlasterBates View Post
    Yes they have, we're talking average earnings. They went up by 3.6% last year.
    Why does your chart show a fall then? Peeking in 2019 and then dropping back

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yorkie62 View Post
    Why does your chart show a fall then? Peeking in 2019 and then dropping back
    With Brexit looming earnings are dipping.
    I'm alright Jack

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