Solutions to the Irish border issue Solutions to the Irish border issue - Page 3
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  1. #21

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  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by meridian View Post
    Gah, FFS man, “Southern Ireland” is even worse! Where were you educated, in a skip?

    “Rulers” (and I know you’re using this pejoratively) has nothing to do with it. The people (remember them?) rather like being in the EU, by 93% at last poll.

    The only thing you’ve said that’s even close to making any sense is that they don’t want a unified Ireland. It’s probably too close to call, a referendum on uniting could go either way. It’s not just the cost, they’re a different people up there.
    rather like being in the EU
    but if the "special status" that citizens of the ROI enjoy as a result of the shared history with the UK, were removed, e.g freedom of travel and free access to the NHS, which existed prior to the ROI and the UK joining the EU, then perhaps that might influence any future vote.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by tazdevil View Post
    Get you, Eire is simply a concise way of saying Southern Ireland. I take it you think everyone's a cretin who has a different POV? Ireland, as in Southern Ireland have a choice and those first two are perfectly valid choices although unlikely as their rulers won't let them anywhere near the option of leaving the EU. They also don't want a unified Ireland as even the Catholics in the North see they're onto a good thing with the >£10bn per year subsidy they enjoy. Southern Ireland can't afford integration financially, politically and socially
    I've had this argument here before. Even the presence of the title Eire (without the grave accent) appearing on official positions in the EU would not deter the critics. Ever since I can remember (I'm 71), my generation has generally referred to the ROI as Eire. This from Wiki -

    The 1922 state, comprising 26 of the 32 counties of Ireland, was "styled and known as the Irish Free State".[17] The Constitution of Ireland, adopted in 1937, provides that "the name of the State is Éire, or, in the English language, Ireland". Section 2 of the Republic of Ireland Act 1948 states, "It is hereby declared that the description of the State shall be the Republic of Ireland." The 1948 Act does not name the state as "Republic of Ireland", because to have done so would have put it in conflict with the Constitution.[18]

    The government of the United Kingdom used the name "Eire" (without the diacritic) and, from 1949, "Republic of Ireland", for the state;[19] it was not until the 1998 Good Friday Agreement that it used the name "Ireland".[20]

    As well as "Ireland", "Éire" or "the Republic of Ireland", the state is also referred to as "the Republic", "Southern Ireland" or "the South".[21] In an Irish republican context it is often referred to as "the Free State" or "the 26 Counties".[22]


    many older people will use the description "wireless" whilst younger people will use the term "radio" and likewise "hit parade" and "charts"
    Last edited by JohntheBike; 23rd August 2019 at 08:46.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohntheBike View Post
    but if the "special status" that citizens of the ROI enjoy as a result of the shared history with the UK, were removed, e.g freedom of travel and free access to the NHS, which existed prior to the ROI and the UK joining the EU, then perhaps that might influence any future vote.
    You can “if” all you like. Deal with the facts as they currently are.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohntheBike View Post
    I've had this argument here before. Even the presence of the title Eire (without the grave accent) appearing on official positions in the EU would not deter the critics. Ever since I can remember (I'm 71), my generation has generally referred to the ROI as Eire. This from Wiki -

    The 1922 state, comprising 26 of the 32 counties of Ireland, was "styled and known as the Irish Free State".[17] The Constitution of Ireland, adopted in 1937, provides that "the name of the State is Éire, or, in the English language, Ireland". Section 2 of the Republic of Ireland Act 1948 states, "It is hereby declared that the description of the State shall be the Republic of Ireland." The 1948 Act does not name the state as "Republic of Ireland", because to have done so would have put it in conflict with the Constitution.[18]

    The government of the United Kingdom used the name "Eire" (without the diacritic) and, from 1949, "Republic of Ireland", for the state;[19] it was not until the 1998 Good Friday Agreement that it used the name "Ireland".[20]

    As well as "Ireland", "Éire" or "the Republic of Ireland", the state is also referred to as "the Republic", "Southern Ireland" or "the South".[21] In an Irish republican context it is often referred to as "the Free State" or "the 26 Counties".[22]


    many older people will use the description "wireless" whilst younger people will use the term "radio" and likewise "hit parade" and "charts"
    The quotes you produce prove the point. “In the English language, Ireland”. “From 1949, Republic of Ireland”.

    If the U.K. government can change, so can you.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by GhostofTarbera View Post
    This again
    And...AGAIN!!! FFS...
    "The boy who cried Sheep"

  7. #27

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    Éire does NOT have a grave accent. It does however have an acute one.
    Quote Originally Posted by JohntheBike View Post
    I've had this argument here before. Even the presence of the title Eire (without the grave accent) appearing on official positions in the EU would not deter the critics. Ever since I can remember (I'm 71), my generation has generally referred to the ROI as Eire. This from Wiki -

    <snip>
    England's greatest sailor since Nelson lost the armada.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by tazdevil View Post
    Get you, Eire is simply a concise way of saying Southern Ireland. I take it you think everyone's a cretin who has a different POV? Ireland, as in Southern Ireland have a choice and those first two are perfectly valid choices although unlikely as their rulers won't let them anywhere near the option of leaving the EU. They also don't want a unified Ireland as even the Catholics in the North see they're onto a good thing with the >£10bn per year subsidy they enjoy. Southern Ireland can't afford integration financially, politically and socially
    There is Republic of Ireland (or if you want to abbreviate Ireland or ROI) and Northern Ireland (NI)... Never heard of Southern Ireland!

    If you say Ireland, anyone that isn't a cretin will understand you are referring to Republic of Ireland!!!
    "The boy who cried Sheep"

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Albert View Post
    Éire does NOT have a grave accent. It does however have an acute one.
    Indeed, it's a diacritic. Think of it like the average remoaner.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Albert View Post
    Éire does NOT have a grave accent. It does however have an acute one.
    yes, I stand corrected

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