Fear mongering Gove Fear mongering Gove - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Posts 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11

    More time posting than coding


    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    279

    Default

    Assuming an average lorry is 17m long and you leave a 1m gap between them and form a single line queue of 7000 you'll get to London centre (actually slightly past as London - Dover is 76miles and 7000 lorries would be 78miles). So anyone living in London will be able to feel like being in Kent, surely a win-win.

  2. #12

    Prof Cunning @ Oxford Uni

    WTFH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21,954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dsc View Post
    Assuming an average lorry is 17m long and you leave a 1m gap between them and form a single line queue of 7000 you'll get to London centre (actually slightly past as London - Dover is 76miles and 7000 lorries would be 78miles). So anyone living in London will be able to feel like being in Kent, surely a win-win.

    How many of the lorries would be in the congestion zone?

    Brexit benefit - lorries paying the congestion charge because they can't leave the country, think of the money the government would make from that!
    I'm perfect, in a very specific and limited way.
    Hands... out infractions
    Face... the music
    Space... between the ears

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WTFH View Post
    How many of the lorries would be in the congestion zone?

    Brexit benefit - lorries paying the congestion charge because they can't leave the country, think of the money the government would make from that!
    Do you mean "Transport For London"?
    Old Greg - In search of acceptance since Mar 2007. Hoping each leap will be his last.

  4. #14

    Double Godlike!

    Paddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    10,964

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zigenare View Post
    Do you mean "Transport For London"?
    Transport for London is a local government body responsible for the transport system in Greater London,

    Keeping London moving - Transport for London

    FFS, Brexiters, thick as...
    "A people that elect corrupt politicians, imposters, thieves and traitors are not victims, but accomplices," George Orwell

  5. #15

    Super poster

    Eirikur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,930

    Default

    More brexit benefit, for HM customs that is, £3.5B on import duties Which will be charged on to the customer (usually with a nice margin on top) resulting in higher retail prices in the shops
    Shoppers could pay more after no-deal Brexit - BBC News

  6. #16

    Double Godlike!

    Paddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    10,964

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eirikur View Post
    More brexit benefit, for HM customs that is, £3.5B on import duties Which will be charged on to the customer (usually with a nice margin on top) resulting in higher retail prices in the shops
    Shoppers could pay more after no-deal Brexit - BBC News
    BBC headline "Shoppers could..." However "Shoppers will..." is what the British Retail Consortium stated.

    Black Market opportunities coming this way. Remember, trucks smuggling from Europe and selling there wares from the backs of trucks in Industrial Parks?
    "A people that elect corrupt politicians, imposters, thieves and traitors are not victims, but accomplices," George Orwell

  7. #17

    More fingers than teeth

    darmstadt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    The Eurozone
    Posts
    18,944

    Default

    Brexit is having a wee in the middle of the room at a house party because nobody is talking to you, and then complaining about the smell.

  8. #18

    I live on CUK

    Old Greg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    The Tombliboo Bush
    Posts
    27,180

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darmstadt View Post
    Jérémie has clearly never been to Kent. But a neat reversal of the Pale of Calais.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bean
    I admit that I'm a lazy lying cretin, but so what?
    25 June 2018

  9. #19

    Prof Cunning @ Oxford Uni

    WTFH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21,954

    Default

    Had a very nice Pinot Noir from Kent at the weekend.

    It’ll be a shame to lose the vin et cidre from that TOM.
    I'm perfect, in a very specific and limited way.
    Hands... out infractions
    Face... the music
    Space... between the ears

  10. #20

    I live on CUK

    Old Greg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    The Tombliboo Bush
    Posts
    27,180

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WTFH View Post
    Had a very nice Pinot Noir from Kent at the weekend.

    It’ll be a shame to lose the vin et cidre from that TOM.
    Wine agreed, but Kentish cider isn't typically great.

    Cider apple - Wikipedia

    Cider is made in several countries and can be made from any apples. Historically the flavours preferred and varieties used to produce cider have varied by region. Many of the most traditional apple varieties used for ciders come from or are derived from those from Devon, Somerset and Herefordshire in England, Normandy in France, and Asturias in Spain, and these areas are considered to have their own broad cider styles although the many exceptions make this more of a historic footnote. Normandy cider is usually naturally carbonated and clear: Asturian cider apple varieties are mainly 'sharps' or mild 'bittersweets',[21] producing a mildly acidic cider which is customarily served by being poured from height into the glass to oxygenate it.[22]In the UK there are two broad styles of cider, determined by the types of apple available. The style associated with the east of England (East Anglia, Kent, Sussex) used surplus dessert and cooking apples and was therefore characterised by an acidic, light-bodied cider. The other style, using specific cider apple cultivars with higher tannin levels, is usually associated with the West Country, particularly Somerset, and Three Counties. Within these broad types there are also a number of more specific regional styles. The ciders of Devon were often made largely from sweets, the cultivars low in acid and tannins that typified the county's orchards.[23][24] Devon cidermakers also specialised in "keeved", or "matched" cider, where fermentation was slowed to produce a naturally sweet finish, though such ciders were usually intended for the London market and a fully fermented, dry "rough" cider was preferred for home consumption.[25] Somerset ciders, by contrast, have tended to be stronger and more tannic. Bittersweet cultivars, locally known as "Jersey" apples, were typical of Somerset, although the county's most famous apple, Kingston Black, was a mild bittersharp.[26] The West Midland county of Gloucestershire traditionally favoured bittersharp apples, giving strong ciders with a higher bite of acidity and tannins: neighbouring Worcestershire and Herefordshire also favoured acidic cider apples, but their growers also made plantings of dual purpose apples to take advantage of markets in nearby industrial centres.[26]
    Quote Originally Posted by Bean
    I admit that I'm a lazy lying cretin, but so what?
    25 June 2018

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •