Why MUST we walk if a rate rise request is refused? Why MUST we walk if a rate rise request is refused?
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    Default Why MUST we walk if a rate rise request is refused?

    This seems to be the 'accepted wisdom' around here, and while I can see it would strengthen our COLLECTIVE position, we are obviously not a union, quite the opposite; we are all mercenaries acting with wildly divergent agendas, the pursuit of superior income flow being about the only shared one. Ninety-nine times out of a hundred, a simple bluff of having a better offer in hand will not result in an arbitrary collapse in negotiations.

    So - am I missing something here? Isn't it better to bluff, have it called, and continue on the normal rate, than to not bother to ask?

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    Quote Originally Posted by SQLSwerver View Post
    So - am I missing something here? Isn't it better to bluff, have it called, and continue on the normal rate, than to not bother to ask?
    Yes you ARE missing something. Once your bluff is called you lose the biggest asset of a contractor. CREDIBILITY

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    Quote Originally Posted by SQLSwerver View Post
    This seems to be the 'accepted wisdom' around here, and while I can see it would strengthen our COLLECTIVE position, we are obviously not a union, quite the opposite; we are all mercenaries acting with wildly divergent agendas, the pursuit of superior income flow being about the only shared one. Ninety-nine times out of a hundred, a simple bluff of having a better offer in hand will not result in an arbitrary collapse in negotiations.

    So - am I missing something here? Isn't it better to bluff, have it called, and continue on the normal rate, than to not bother to ask?
    I don't believe that opinion on here is don't ask - if you don't ask you don't get.

    General opinion is that asking is ineffective and you are more likely to get a rate rise if you leave than if you ask, that's all.
    "I can put any old tat in my sig, put quotes around it and attribute to someone of whom I've heard, to make myself look wise and well read."
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    Quote Originally Posted by cojak View Post
    I don't believe that opinion on here is don't ask - if you don't ask you don't get.

    General opinion is that asking is ineffective and you are more likely to get a rate rise if you leave than if you ask, that's all.
    +1 to that. Whenever anyone asks about rate rises the advice is generally you have to prove you have over delivered and are worth the extra and don't just ask if you aren't willing to walk. Agent will just see you as an easy touch and will never get one.

    You can ask... But do it properly. Half arsed attempt will look worse than not trying.
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    This thread relies too much on absolutes.

    There is a lot of mileage in doing some research first and understanding how much wiggle room there is between you and the agent (if there is one). If there is some latitude, then it's all about your negotiation skills.

    Your opening gambit doesn't have to be 'Give me the dough or the puppy dies!'

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    Quote Originally Posted by tractor View Post
    Your opening gambit doesn't have to be 'Give me the dough or the puppy dies!'
    Yeah but when the time is right, you have to say it like you mean it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SQLSwerver View Post
    This seems to be the 'accepted wisdom' around here, and while I can see it would strengthen our COLLECTIVE position, we are obviously not a union, quite the opposite; we are all mercenaries acting with wildly divergent agendas, the pursuit of superior income flow being about the only shared one. Ninety-nine times out of a hundred, a simple bluff of having a better offer in hand will not result in an arbitrary collapse in negotiations.

    So - am I missing something here? Isn't it better to bluff, have it called, and continue on the normal rate, than to not bother to ask?
    Obviously a sockie. Or do you enjoy being g made to look a tit by having your bluff called and backing down?
    I couldn't give two fornicators! Yes, really!

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    Quote Originally Posted by cojak View Post
    I don't believe that opinion on here is don't ask - if you don't ask you don't get.

    General opinion is that asking is ineffective and you are more likely to get a rate rise if you leave than if you ask, that's all.
    When my position is strong enough to test that opinion, I'll relay the result here.

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    The thing that most people seem to forget that typically your contract is with the agency, it's them you have to persuade. You must answer the agent's "what's in it for me?" thoughts. If he/she/it can get even an extra £10 a day out of you then that's better for their stats and they may just ask the client properly on your behalf, if they're getting nothing from you getting more money then they'll just tell you "no" and call your bluff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SQLSwerver View Post
    This seems to be the 'accepted wisdom' around here, and while I can see it would strengthen our COLLECTIVE position, we are obviously not a union, quite the opposite; we are all mercenaries acting with wildly divergent agendas, the pursuit of superior income flow being about the only shared one. Ninety-nine times out of a hundred, a simple bluff of having a better offer in hand will not result in an arbitrary collapse in negotiations.

    So - am I missing something here? Isn't it better to bluff, have it called, and continue on the normal rate, than to not bother to ask?

    You are right, ignore the people here who just repeat what they have heard from others. Bluffing is a huge tool that is used in all negotiations, you have to sound convincing though but as an agent hates losing a stream of income you can usually push them over.

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