Same client - new role - Push for raise? Same client - new role - Push for raise?
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  1. #1

    Nervous Newbie


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    Default Same client - new role - Push for raise?

    I am contracted to work for a consultancy and am placed on one of their client sites.

    The end-client has recently had a big culling of contractors. One of people they have asked to leave is doing a department level lead role. The end-client has informed the consultancy I work for they would like me to fulfil that role due to past performance.

    The consultancy hiring manager told me this and also mentioned that there would be no additional renumeration according to the client.

    The hiring manager from the client side later informed me that I should ask for additional renumeration as it is extra responsibility - he was surprised when I mentioned that I had been told there wasn't any.

    The following day the same client hiring manager said that he had chatted with the consultancy hiring manager and confirmed that "the consultancy does not pay additional for that role"

    Now, I am no fool and believe that I have moved boxes on a rate card and am likely being billed out at a higher rate, with the consultancy pocketing the extra. They have lost a lot of staff in the culling so understandably trying to keep their margins up.

    What would you do in my situation?

    My agent advised me to either refuse the role or call it out. He is unwilling to negotiate on my behalf as he is a complete pussy that is scared of rocking the boat.

    It's frustrating that they have asked me to do this as I am good, but they don't want to pay me anymore than they pay anyone else - some people are even getting more than me. I am tempted to suggest they get one of the others to do it if there's no extra money and see where that takes me.

    Is it just a case of having to suck it up?

  2. #2

    I live on CUK

    Old Greg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aft View Post
    I am contracted to work for a consultancy and am placed on one of their client sites.

    The end-client has recently had a big culling of contractors. One of people they have asked to leave is doing a department level lead role. The end-client has informed the consultancy I work for they would like me to fulfil that role due to past performance.

    The consultancy hiring manager told me this and also mentioned that there would be no additional renumeration according to the client.

    The hiring manager from the client side later informed me that I should ask for additional renumeration as it is extra responsibility - he was surprised when I mentioned that I had been told there wasn't any.

    The following day the same client hiring manager said that he had chatted with the consultancy hiring manager and confirmed that "the consultancy does not pay additional for that role"

    Now, I am no fool and believe that I have moved boxes on a rate card and am likely being billed out at a higher rate, with the consultancy pocketing the extra. They have lost a lot of staff in the culling so understandably trying to keep their margins up.

    What would you do in my situation?

    My agent advised me to either refuse the role or call it out. He is unwilling to negotiate on my behalf as he is a complete pussy that is scared of rocking the boat.

    It's frustrating that they have asked me to do this as I am good, but they don't want to pay me anymore than they pay anyone else - some people are even getting more than me. I am tempted to suggest they get one of the others to do it if there's no extra money and see where that takes me.

    Is it just a case of having to suck it up?
    Thank them for the offer of new business and advise them that you will issue a quotation to the agency, keenly priced to reflect how much you value the business relationship.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bean
    I admit that I'm a lazy lying cretin, but so what?
    25 June 2018

  3. #3

    More time posting than coding


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    I would pretty much always ask for more money because my warchest is endless and I basically pillage the clients woman.

    Seriosuly though, it's a game of leverage. How much do you _need/want_ this role?

  4. #4

    More fingers than teeth

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    This isn't clear cut. The client has just gone through a major cull so saving money is their top priority. You have been selected to move into a lead role, but surely there are a few others who could potentially do the same, after all they have more consultants than they can place.

    The point is you are currently not in a lead role so you probably wouldn't get a lead role elsewhere, this is an opportunity to be able to get further lead roles in the future.

    If you already have an exemplary CV with a number of lead roles and regular offers then you can ask for more, if not don't rock the boat and take the opportunity to skill up with a potentially higher rate in a few months time.

    On the whole if you want a higher rate you should be looking elsewhere. If you are worth that rate some client will offer it to you.
    I'm alright Jack

  5. #5

    TykeLike

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    You have a few options:

    • Decline the increased responsibility and stick to your contracted role, and say any changes leaves you open to SDC and an IR35 red flag
    • Say you will be happy to take the new role but you will need a new contract (even if the rate doesn't change the contract should)
    • Suck it up and keep billing


    If there has been a cull already, option 1 leaves you open to being moved out at the next opportunity, IMHO you have shot yourself in the foot by discussing things with your end client, but even if the client isn't paying more, there is always lean in the chain with the cut the consultancy is making and the agent.

    The big questions is what are you prepared to do if you don't get the raise? 100% of something is better than 110% of nothing!
    “Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.”

    ― Marcus Aurelius

  6. #6

    Nervous Newbie


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    I spoke to someone on site who had a similar opportunity some months ago.

    They said they pushed for an increase and only got around 5% more.

    I think I am going to bide my time until contract expiry and then ask for an increase with the aim to get 15% more.

    Next renewal is end of my 24 months so I will mention increased costs as a factor.

  7. #7

    More fingers than teeth

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    If you want a significant rise you are probably going to have to leave. It doesn't matter how good you are they will not give the rise on principle.
    5% sounds about right for the next renewal. It doesn't matter how much the PM will want you, they will face an immovable wall in the accounts department.

    No harm in trying for a 15% rise at renewal and who knows they may agree, but be prudent and plan for a 5% rise.
    I'm alright Jack

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