Opinion Please: Choosing between two offers Contract VS Perm Opinion Please: Choosing between two offers Contract VS Perm - Page 2
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  1. #11

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    Contracting might go pear-shaped for the next two years, most perm jobs might go to younger guys if it does, and by the time it rights itself you might be seen as too old. There's no guarantees with the perm job, either, of course, but it's more secure than contracting.

    So, it depends. If your 30 years of perm has given you a pretty solid pension base and let you get your mortgage paid off, and you aren't going to starve even if the whole thing turns upside down, do whatever you want to do. You'll be ok.

    If you have a massive mortgage and your pension plan was weak, and you have no way to pay off that mortgage without earning good money for the next 12-15 years, and you might be hungry and cold in retirement, best go perm, at least until the contract market looks healthier.

    You're probably somewhere in between those two extremes. But you are probably closer to one than the other. The risk in the contract role is probably much higher. The reward also is higher. How much does the risk matter to you in your circumstances, and how much does the reward matter to you in your circumstances?

    I jumped from perm at about your age. But honestly, I could have retired, if what I wanted to do wasn't more fun.

  2. #12

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    All good comments above. Age bias is a factor that I've experienced in recent contract roles, and cannot imagine it would be any better in a perm job. Whilst employers say they "accommodate" for various needs I've yet to see anything that addresses mature workforce. I'd incline toward the contract role, simply because you can keep looking and move as and when you like. Yes, the market is tough at the moment but its no easier to get a perm job (and then you have to jump through hoops like tests, videos, and multiple protracted interview stages, etc.). One other thing I would consider is which option would give you the best possibility to enjoy life overall. Good luck.

  3. #13

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    I’ve taken all reference to my age off my cv. It’s against the law to discrimiate on age, but I don’t want anything going against me.

    As far as the OP. All depends on your financial position.

    However, those journeys will grind you down. Personally I would take the contract and stay the odd night away, you can afford to. Couple that with flexible working and you have a lot less stress. Instead of 10 journeys, you could get it down to 4 or 5 a week.

    Also building up cash in your ltd company gives you options later in life if your wife decides to stop working.

    Go with your gut is my best advice, but god I struggle with these decisions myself.
    Last edited by BABABlackSheep; 29th October 2019 at 08:01.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lance View Post
    take the contract on the proviso that it will be outside IR35 when the client has to make the determination. You may need to help them make that decision. Make sure you clearly understand what is needed for it to be outside and make it just like that.

    The rate is not brilliant, but it's a damn sight better than £80k.
    From the tax position is definitely a better for me personally because I intend to put the maximum possible to pension and top up the previous years too. This also reduces the tax liability significantly which is worth another £9k. But of course all depends on how long I hang onto the contract. As others are saying and my own experience, it can stop as quickly as it starts.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by BABABlackSheep View Post
    I’ve taken all reference to my age off my cv. It’s against the law to discrimiate on age, but I don’t want anything going against me.

    As far as the OP. All depends on your financial position.

    However, those journeys will grind you down. Personally I would take the contract and stay the odd night away, you can afford to. Couple that with flexible working and you have a lot less stress. Instead of 10 journeys, you could get it down to 4 or 5 a week.

    Also building up cash in your ltd company gives you options later in life if your wife decides to stop working.

    Go with your gut is my best advice, but god I struggle with these decisions myself.
    I did the same when I came back on the market, In fact I didn’t even feel comfortable showing how long I stayed at my first job as a Graduate trainee. TBH, I found most agent only cares about the most relevant experience which is my last 4 years.

    I am concerned about the journey too although I did it for a couple of years in my 30s, it’s certainly not something I look forward to. However the last gig was in London and I hated the packed commute. At least I have a guaranteed seat enjoy my lovely car which hardly get used and I have already talked with the other half about staying away some nights.
    Last edited by WindySong; 30th October 2019 at 06:47.

  6. #16

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    Thanks to all your thoughts and advice. My own thought pattern is along the same lines. With all the risks taken into consideration, my heart is still on taking a chance, third time lucky...fingers crossed!

    The biggest deciding factor is the flexibility to take minimum salary and dividends due to my BTL income. TBH, I don’t have to work but a few more years to build up the funds will give me more flexibility in my retirement. Hence my motivation for putting up with the long commute. Also, I aim to WFH on occasions whenever I can once settled in.

    The tricky thing is both jobs offers good prospect and I will be more marketable once I finish the project. It’s on a growth area which is dominated by contractors. Hence the reason for the increased pay on the permanent job because companies found it difficult to recruit perm on the midget salaries. Anyone with a few years of experience would be attracted by getting double the salary going on day rate. I won’t have considered the permanent role if the market was better, just bad timing.

    So all thing considered, I am jumping in with both feet. Hopefully I will last longer than the previous contracts. Wish me luck!

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by BABABlackSheep View Post
    I’ve taken all reference to my age off my cv
    I should probably do this but my CV also has a full career history with dates. Did you just remove dates from your earlier career info or just slice off anything more than (say) 20 years ago?

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snooky View Post
    I should probably do this but my CV also has a full career history with dates. Did you just remove dates from your earlier career info or just slice off anything more than (say) 20 years ago?
    I rejigged my CV a couple of years ago to remove references to age and dates. Instead I now give some sample engagements, including client details but without dates, highlighting the relevant skills and experience from each etc. I've been going for 20 years with over a dozen different clients so I pick and choose which sample engagements to include based on the target role.

  9. #19

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    If I was in your situation I think I would probably opt for the perm role, my reasons would be that with the uncertainly of IR35 and Brexit *sigh*, I would use the stability (well as much as a perm role gives) to ride the storm until things settle down.

    I also think the longer you leave it (the closer to April 2020) the harder it will become, less contract roles (potentially, or more likely classed as inside) and tougher competition on both contract and perm roles.

    Oh the joys!

    WLB

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snooky View Post
    I should probably do this but my CV also has a full career history with dates. Did you just remove dates from your earlier career info or just slice off anything more than (say) 20 years ago?
    I’ve worked that many places. I just included the last 15 years. I then have a significant other experience section, but I just amend these dependent on the role and if they are relevant. I don’t say when I worked there. So for example, if I apply for a Public sector role, I include all of those gigs.

    I nowadays get caught out by not having specific experience in a particular industry. Its because there are so many applicants for every role, agencies want to place(whittle down)people who have worked at that place before or somewhere very similar. Never mind who’s actually good at what they do.

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