Agent lied to me about the client’s office hours & client actually wants an employee Agent lied to me about the client’s office hours & client actually wants an employee - Page 2
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  1. #11

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    I would think they would let you go immediately (unpaid as remember you are a contractor) then you can watch eggheads at 6pm without watching the clock


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  2. #12

    My post count is Majestic

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    Quote Originally Posted by cojak View Post
    I when I had this I simply handed in my notice and left. The entire contract lasted 8 weeks. I put it onto my CV and didn’t worry about it. Provided not all of your contracts are this short, it’s not a problem.
    And this post nails the whole thing. Nothing more to it than that really.

    You can't stick it through as relationships will break down and it will turn in to a nightmare. It's also a massive IR35 risk so personally I'd be going on that alone. It's happened to me as well and I'd bet most long term contractors. Just part of the game. Don't stress, just move on.

    One note however, this is the type of thing you should be clearing up at interview. As a contractor it's a true two way interview. You should be asking the client what there is in the role for you and clarifying your requirements with the potential client. It's different to a perm interview where you are at the mercy of what they want. You need to grill them about your working conditions, the work and their expectations to decide if you really want their gig. I've escaped a couple of potential nightmare gigs by digging in to the situation at interview.
    'CUK forum personality of 2011 - Winner - Yes really!!!!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by cojak View Post
    I when I had this I simply handed in my notice and left. The entire contract lasted 8 weeks. I put it onto my CV and didn’t worry about it. Provided not all of your contracts are this short, it’s not a problem.
    I might first ask the client what their knowledge was of contractor usage and subsequent tax impositions.

    Reason for this is that we do not know what the client has been sold by an agent. In the worst case scenario, the client may have just requested a temp and happily accepted a 'contractor' without the full awareness of all the implications.

    Based on their answer of naivety, I would then use it as an opportunity to educate from within. In just the same way I think these people will need to be educated from within about IR35 because if, as we suspect, all they're reading is what the HMRC are pushing out, then that will be a case of the blind being lead by the stupidly blind. And the world may as well close up shop and go home.

    Of course, if their answer is one of 'contractor' experience and knowledge, and they are still wishing to bash on regardless in this manner, then indeed. Notice period and leave.

  4. #14

    Should post faster


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    This'll probably be an unpopular post like a few lately, but oh well...!

    Frankly my view is that a contractor is a flexible resource, and usually paid significantly better than a permie due to that flexibility, along with enhanced skills and experience. Part of what clients expect, in my experience, is a can-do attitude and a willingness to go the extra mile. If that means sometimes working evenings and weekends when needed to get something over the line, I would expect to do that.

    I appreciate that for whatever reason not everyone can do this, and people can have valid reasons for needed to get home regularly at a particular time. If that's the case though then I would be making that abundantly clear before contracts are signed. Managing expectations up front is key.

    If having to work until 6pm is a real deal-breaker for you, then quit. As others have said the occasional very short contract won't be a problem on the CV.

  5. #15

    Contractor Among Contractors


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    Another vote to simply hand in notice and go...

    Continue working your own hours or whatever contract says (If client doesn't like this then can simply ask you to go - problem solved)

    Decide yourself how you want to process the cash flow (PAYE vs Dividends) depending on your attitude to risk.

  6. #16

    Some things in Moderation

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amanensia View Post
    This'll probably be an unpopular post like a few lately, but oh well...!

    Frankly my view is that a contractor is a flexible resource, and usually paid significantly better than a permie due to that flexibility, along with enhanced skills and experience. Part of what clients expect, in my experience, is a can-do attitude and a willingness to go the extra mile. If that means sometimes working evenings and weekends when needed to get something over the line, I would expect to do that.

    I appreciate that for whatever reason not everyone can do this, and people can have valid reasons for needed to get home regularly at a particular time. If that's the case though then I would be making that abundantly clear before contracts are signed. Managing expectations up front is key.

    If having to work until 6pm is a real deal-breaker for you, then quit. As others have said the occasional very short contract won't be a problem on the CV.
    Only up to a point.

    In my case I initially refused the contract as the location as a PIA to get to for me, a 2-hour drive across the country on A-roads. The agent (not the Business Development Manager for a consultancy but an agent for a BOS recruiter) told me that the client encouraged train travel.

    This was definitely not the case and when the client demanded that I stay until 5pm (I was leaving a 4.30pm) I immediately handed in my notice.

    That contract was definitely not worth the hassle.

  7. #17

    Still gathering requirements...


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    If it's a good enough gig then surely it's at least worth trying to reach a compromise with the client. Explain that as far as you are concerned the position was sold to you as 1730 finish. I'd be asking if I could start earlier, work through lunchtimes etc to make up the extra half hour per day.

    i'd take the others being contractors as a plus, as they should be familiar that not everyone is created equal. If their contract says 1800 then that's what they signed up for. each contract to their own.

    if there's no compromise then it can still end amicably between you and the client. Just make sure they're informed that you're leaving due to the fact that as far as you're concerned, the Agency they hired to recruit you, deliberately misled you.

    If you were told the hours were until 1730 that's what you signed up for - no more no less.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amanensia View Post
    This'll probably be an unpopular post like a few lately, but oh well...!

    Frankly my view is that a contractor is a flexible resource, and usually paid significantly better than a permie due to that flexibility, along with enhanced skills and experience. Part of what clients expect, in my experience, is a can-do attitude and a willingness to go the extra mile. If that means sometimes working evenings and weekends when needed to get something over the line, I would expect to do that.

    I appreciate that for whatever reason not everyone can do this, and people can have valid reasons for needed to get home regularly at a particular time. If that's the case though then I would be making that abundantly clear before contracts are signed. Managing expectations up front is key.

    If having to work until 6pm is a real deal-breaker for you, then quit. As others have said the occasional very short contract won't be a problem on the CV.
    I think the statements 'going the extra mile' and 'being told to stay until 6pm' are mutually exclusive. And certainly from a IR35 tax position.

    Offering to get the job done no matter the time in the evening is wholly different to getting the job done by 3pm and still having to stick around until some arbitrary time.

    The former makes you stand out and keeps you (in part) away from IR35. The latter might make you stand out at the client, but will Certainly make you stand out in the HMRC's eyes.

  9. #19

    Ddraig Goch


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    So is there a reason for 6pm? And what time do you start?

    With me, if theres a good reason why I need to be there at a certain then I'll see what I can do. If the odd more hours then fine but its 8 hour max average for me.

    I know it can be a bit of an IR35 pointer to have hours in the contract but it does, at least, make things easier somtimes.

    Then, I've met a few clients where "everyone does 10 hours a day". Yeh right you mean the permies who are trying to impress and you want the contractors to do it because "you cost enough so want my moneys worth".

    No thanks....
    Rhyddid i lofnod psychocandy!!!!

  10. #20

    Contractor Among Contractors


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    One thing I always take from these threads is just how many more hours people are doing than me

    6pm ? 8 hour days ?

    If you are on a day rate you really need to consider how much you are happy to undercut yourself...

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