Client asks for additional tasks outside of project scope Client asks for additional tasks outside of project scope
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  1. #1

    Nervous Newbie


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    Default Client asks for additional tasks outside of project scope

    Apologies if this was asked here before, tried to find the relevant thread...

    Direct client. Contracted to deliver implementation of cloud system. Client now asked for additional admin tasks outside of the original project. By admin in mean moving files from one cloud system to the server or vice versa (not related to my main project). Client admits its not related "but it needs doing".

    How would you react?

  2. #2

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    ladymuck's Avatar
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    Ask for a variation to the contract be raised with the appropriate fee for doing the work.

  3. #3

    My post count is Majestic

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    Quote Originally Posted by ladymuck View Post
    Ask for a variation to the contract be raised with the appropriate fee for doing the work.
    Possibly but it doesn't avoid the fact the client sees the OP as a resource they can direct and control. Could just be a one off, do it and forget about it or it could be the start of becoming part and parcel so causing an IR35 problem.
    'CUK forum personality of 2011 - Winner - Yes really!!!!

  4. #4

    Still gathering requirements...


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    What is in your SoW? I was in a similar position, being asked to do some extra work on something only partially related to what I'm currently working on and I just refused saying I can't be used as a resource. Client is fairly mellow, so just said "oh ok" and I carried on, but I can imagine some clients having a hissy fit in a similar scenario. Theoretically your SoW could be modified to include the extra task, but I'd be wary if it's something just thrown in and unrelated to what your main task is. On the other hand as NLUK says if it's a quick and one-off job you could just do it and not worry too much.

  5. #5

    Fingers like lightning


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    I think while the only thing on everyone's horizon right now is IR35, we are probably guilty of questioning every single move.

    IR35 decisions are still made based on 50 questions (in court, if not on CEST) and, as above, helping a client out once can demonstrate some flexibility.

    I would quietly educate the client about what the implications are of such to the contractor, but at the same time probably do it for him. And when there is a next time, you can refer him to the recent education and plan a way through.

    Remember, we are a flexible resource and there are many ways to define that.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by simes View Post
    I think while the only thing on everyone's horizon right now is IR35, we are probably guilty of questioning every single move.

    IR35 decisions are still made based on 50 questions (in court, if not on CEST) and, as above, helping a client out once can demonstrate some flexibility.

    I would quietly educate the client about what the implications are of such to the contractor, but at the same time probably do it for him. And when there is a next time, you can refer him to the recent education and plan a way through.

    Remember, we are a flexible resource and there are many ways to define that.
    Couple of things could arise here:

    If you were to do it, then it could just be the thin edge of the wedge insofar as if you refuse to do it the next time, the client might say 'well, you did it last time, so what's the problem, & who's going to know anyway, & how would HMRC ever find out?' .

    Conversely, the client might take your point & not bother you again with such stuff.

    If you flat out, but politely, refuse to do it from the off, then the client might just see you as being obstructive, & consider his options regarding your contract.

    Conversely, he might appreciate the 'education'.

    Difficult call either way, & is dependent on how well you know the client, & his/her knowledge of how contracting should work.
    Clarity is everything

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteelyDan View Post
    Couple of things could arise here:

    If you were to do it, then it could just be the thin edge of the wedge insofar as if you refuse to do it the next time, the client might say 'well, you did it last time, so what's the problem, & who's going to know anyway, & how would HMRC ever find out?' .
    Well, to be fair, this will only be mitigated by the power and success of your educating him. The education here being one of potential implications to the contractor.

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