leaving and permie taking over leaving and permie taking over - Page 5
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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lance View Post
    a handover is not the same as training. Spoon-feeding counts as training IMO.
    I always do a handover. I always refuse to do training.
    Why don't you want to train people? Maybe offer to do it at a higher rate?

    I just don't get why people turn down work.. if you don't like the work just do it for a higher rate.

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayn200 View Post
    Why don't you want to train people? Maybe offer to do it at a higher rate?

    I just don't get why people turn down work.. if you don't like the work just do it for a higher rate.
    Most clients will expect it at the same rate. Training your replacement in all your skills and knowledge should demand a much higher rate, but clients see this as part of your job.

    Therefore, I will not train people to be my replacement because that is not my role. To document, to handover, but not in depth training of my core skills.
    I design idiot proof software. Trouble is, they keep making better idiots.

  3. #43

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    Either be super professional and helpful, closing the door gently on the way out, or do a massive dump in the bogs without flushing. leave a pack of fish fingers behind the radiator and plough salt into the earth on the way out. I always go for the former but show some integrity and come down firmly on one side or the other.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by _V_ View Post
    Most clients will expect it at the same rate. Training your replacement in all your skills and knowledge should demand a much higher rate, but clients see this as part of your job.

    Therefore, I will not train people to be my replacement because that is not my role. To document, to handover, but not in depth training of my core skills.
    If it's not on your SoW, you should of course quote for the job.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by eek View Post
    Well the professional response is to do a formal handover and leave in such a way that you are the first person they call when it all goes Pete Tong.

    I suspect however you will avoid doing any handover and will be blamed by the offshore person for their inability to do their job (which is why you do a formal handover and get them to document the handover).
    Anything that goes wrong will be blamed on the departed contractor anyway.

    I always did a documented handover of business processes but didn’t do any knowledge transfer of my skills which is what they wanted most of the time.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayn200 View Post
    Why don't you want to train people? Maybe offer to do it at a higher rate?

    I just don't get why people turn down work.. if you don't like the work just do it for a higher rate.
    I can’t be bothered to teach people something they can’t be arsed to learn themselves.
    See You Next Tuesday

  7. #47

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    Like most people my skills have been honed over the years... no way I can teach everything I know in a short period of time.

    End of the day, act professional at all times unless you're prepared for your company to have to deal with the consequences.

    Document what needs documenting, show the guy what he needs to know to pick up the work. It's not a difficult thing to work out.

  8. #48

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    I was once involved in a handover ( "Transition to Offshore") that, because of the complexity of the system, and relatively low skills of the receiving team took longer to complete than the actual development.

    Still, it was a good time to learn new skills whilst invoicing, tidy up loose ends and ensure that should the system collapse the day after I left, there would be no chance of being scape-goated.

    At the end of it all, the client was happy, I had new things to add to my CV. Job done.



    * Footnote : A couple of years later I went into the same office to catch up with some old mates. Got speaking to the IT manager and asked him "How did the off-shoring turn out?".

    And he replied, without out any sense of irony or introspection, "Really well. It was difficult at first and things do take longer and cost more, but it's worked out".

    About 12 months later his role was outsourced.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by tomtomagain View Post
    I was once involved in a handover ( "Transition to Offshore") that, because of the complexity of the system, and relatively low skills of the receiving team took longer to complete than the actual development.

    Still, it was a good time to learn new skills whilst invoicing, tidy up loose ends and ensure that should the system collapse the day after I left, there would be no chance of being scape-goated.

    At the end of it all, the client was happy, I had new things to add to my CV. Job done.



    * Footnote : A couple of years later I went into the same office to catch up with some old mates. Got speaking to the IT manager and asked him "How did the off-shoring turn out?".

    And he replied, without out any sense of irony or introspection, "Really well. It was difficult at first and things do take longer and cost more, but it's worked out".

    About 12 months later his role was outsourced.
    "things take longer and cost more" & "it's worked out"

    They sounds mutually exclusive to me.
    See You Next Tuesday

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lance View Post
    "things take longer and cost more" & "it's worked out"

    They sounds mutually exclusive to me.
    I agree. He probably meant by worked out as they are still able to deliver... I wouldn't say that has worked out but i guess maybe that's his interpretation?

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