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  1. #41

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    diseasex has more data than eek


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    Quote Originally Posted by lukemg View Post
    If you want/need the money now (or in the next 5 years), then you should not even consider investing in the first place.
    The objective is FIRE (Financial Independence/Retire Early) not to accumulate till you die. This can happen of course but imagine being 50-55 and completely financially secure for the rest of your life. You can carry on working or not, pick and choose work and locations, walk away from sh*t jobs you would usually have to stick in, take 3 or 6 month breaks, have every summer off. It is a freedom few people will ever get. So you build up the pot and then run it down as you need.

    If you are talking short-term trading then that is a different chat. For day traders the standard is 90% lose 90% of their money in 90 days. I know people can get lucky for a while and some do have the aptitude to consistently be ahead (just like some can bet on horses and win or be professional footballers, it dont mean you can).
    You are competing against thousands of smarter people with better, quicker information than you can ever get. This is no different from betting on horses cos you like the names, I don't fancy those odds...
    +1
    Invest in share that is growing financially, and have other good factors like good management etc. And price will follow sooner or later...

    So far made 4300$ on speculation since Monday to be honest that gets me nowhere. To get a million i would need to make £50k consistently every month for 2 years (OK less because have pot already)
    Long term investment is the key
    Last edited by diseasex; 3rd March 2017 at 09:37.

  2. #42

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    jamesbrown is a fount of knowledge

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    Quote Originally Posted by lukemg View Post
    If you want/need the money now (or in the next 5 years), then you should not even consider investing in the first place.
    The objective is FIRE (Financial Independence/Retire Early) not to accumulate till you die. This can happen of course but imagine being 50-55 and completely financially secure for the rest of your life. You can carry on working or not, pick and choose work and locations, walk away from sh*t jobs you would usually have to stick in, take 3 or 6 month breaks, have every summer off. It is a freedom few people will ever get. So you build up the pot and then run it down as you need.

    If you are talking short-term trading then that is a different chat. For day traders the standard is 90% lose 90% of their money in 90 days. I know people can get lucky for a while and some do have the aptitude to consistently be ahead (just like some can bet on horses and win or be professional footballers, it dont mean you can).
    You are competing against thousands of smarter people with better, quicker information than you can ever get. This is no different from betting on horses cos you like the names, I don't fancy those odds...
    As I say, it's too prescriptive. You can be fully aware of the benefits of one strategy over another - I believe I concurred that the long-term value play is the best one in, er, the long-term - but there's not much fun in that approach, and you're wrong to suggest that everything in between this approach and day trading is, effectively, gambling. I'm not interested in day trading at all, in fact. I adopt your strategy for my pension. I don't use the stock markets to become financially independent. I have a day job for that, because it's a far more certain path to early retirement. If your motivation were the only sensible one, there would be no point in investing after one became financially independent. Nah, there are various different, legitimate, motivations for investment, and I like a mixture. I've been investing since my early 20s, with all manner of outcomes, but the pension pot has neither been the most interesting nor the most lucrative.

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