Babies on Planes Babies on Planes - Page 6
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Posts 51 to 52 of 52
  1. #51

    Contractor Among Contractors

    clearedforlanding 's job has never been outsourced

    clearedforlanding's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Found myself. Still lost.
    Posts
    1,502

    Default



    Air travel sucks at all levels. This is what you are faced with if you have sold you life to walk through the "million pound door". Not quite wall to wall chicks drunk on Krug.

    Inspiring...


  2. #52

    Contractor Among Contractors

    clearedforlanding 's job has never been outsourced

    clearedforlanding's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Found myself. Still lost.
    Posts
    1,502

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by d000hg View Post
    If they charge you more it's a premium seat. If people consider it a more desirable seat it's a premium seat. But this distracts from the question, why they wanted someone to give up such a seat rather than anyone, so they can be together.

    And yes it is reasonable that parents should be able to sit with their young child. If the system doesn't do it automatically, human decency is that the steward(ess) should politely ask people, and someone should offer. In a polite world, the steward(ess) would thank them and give them a free drink if it's not free to start with.
    It's like pausing to hold the door for someone with a baby in their arms... you're not obliged to do it but it's still the thing to do.

    On our recent long-haul flight, for some reason we couldn't check in to the long 2nd leg of our flight until we got to the airport from our first flight... so the plane was absolutely full and we were all placed in middle seats. My wife is a very nervous flyer who couldn't cope sat on her own for 8 hours so we got someone to switch.
    If they charge you more it is ancillary revenue.

    Ancillary revenue != a premium product.

    It is an an additional charge that gives you a base product, adequate, acceptable or in addition to you needs, calculated within volume weighting loading to a price that is acceptable to you.

    The value proposition is a less painful transportation offering. Profit margins are higher on a soft product.

    aka, "Would you like fries with that?".

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •