77% of graduates won't pay all of their student loan back before they die 77% of graduates won't pay all of their student loan back before they die - Page 3
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  1. #21

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    So Corbyn's election pledge to scrap tuition fees was a 'free' win if the majority don't already pay off the loan anyway.
    Maybe tomorrow, I'll want to settle down. Until tomorrow, I'll just keep moving on.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by xoggoth View Post
    As others have said above, if students are not paying off their loans it shows their degrees were of little benefit.
    I disagree.

    A friend who studied psychology and then his Phd in clinical psychology began practising after 7 years of study for £22k in the NHS. The next grade was up to a maximum of £44k after 10 years of practice. That is utterly appalling. Clinical phycologists are lacking in the country. It is one of those professions whereby most clinicians know each other. Mental health is becoming a big issue now and more so in the years to come.

    Mental health is one of the most foreseeable issues of the present day we're sleepwalking into a crisis in the years ahead. The government should be planning for those years ahead but instead it pursues populist agenda and skank renumeration for those professions that are needed most.

    In fact it was a solid reason for leaving the UK myself, Engineering qualification then studied a masters in operational research (no loans I should say, worked in the summer semesters) and then offered I think it was £23k.

    Bottom line, the UK does not value skilled professionals. And until the lust for financial wizards dissipates nothing will change. Perhaps the collapse of the city would be a good thing for the country if Brexit delivers this.
    “We've always defined ourselves by the ability to overcome the impossible. And we count these moments. These moments when we dare to aim higher, to break barriers, to reach for the stars, to make the unknown known. We count these moments as our proudest achievements. But we lost all that. Or perhaps we've just forgotten that we are still pioneers. And we've barely begun. And that our greatest accomplishments cannot be behind us, because our destiny lies above us.”

  3. #23

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    So Corbyn's election pledge to scrap tuition fees was a 'free' win
    Free if you ignore the fact that the number of students will rise and the number not paying off their feels will rise even more steeply.
    bloggoth

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  4. #24

    I live on CUK

    SueEllen is a fount of knowledge

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    Quote Originally Posted by xoggoth View Post
    But does that make much sense in the long term? Migrants will eventually age too and most indicators suggest that lifespan will continue to increase for a while yet. If the retirement age stays the same, today's hard working youth will spend even longer as net recipients of the state and, as more will have been in higher education, often pointlessly, they will contributed less to the tax system.
    Lots of EU migrants especially from the older EU countries use to feck off home after about 7 years so their aging isn't a problem.

    (And yes they would take their newly found husband/wife with them.)
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  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by scooterscot View Post
    I disagree.

    A friend who studied psychology and then his Phd in clinical psychology began practising after 7 years of study for £22k in the NHS. The next grade was up to a maximum of £44k after 10 years of practice. That is utterly appalling. Clinical phycologists are lacking in the country. It is one of those professions whereby most clinicians know each other. Mental health is becoming a big issue now and more so in the years to come.

    Mental health is one of the most foreseeable issues of the present day we're sleepwalking into a crisis in the years ahead. The government should be planning for those years ahead but instead it pursues populist agenda and skank renumeration for those professions that are needed most.

    In fact it was a solid reason for leaving the UK myself, Engineering qualification then studied a masters in operational research (no loans I should say, worked in the summer semesters) and then offered I think it was £23k.

    Bottom line, the UK does not value skilled professionals. And until the lust for financial wizards dissipates nothing will change. Perhaps the collapse of the city would be a good thing for the country if Brexit delivers this.
    A collapse of the housing market and a move away from BTL investors raping the young to service a relentless lust for wealth would also be a good thing.

  6. #26

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    They probably did Celtic studies.

    https://www.thecompleteuniversitygui...onal-premiums/


    Most of those show a decent starting wage.
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  7. #27

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    I disagree
    I largely agree with your disagreement. Probably true from your example that my comment was rather simplistic. While there may be many who study subjects that are of little use there are other subjects that are not valued as they should be.

    Got an engineering degree myself and have been used to earning about half what some on here earned in banking etc. any excessive reliance on one sector has risks and the overemphasis on financial services is worrying, too easy for others to target, for political as well as technical reasons. The health sector generally is lacking, it is very difficult to get a place to study.

    Trouble is, I have little confidence in government making reliable decisions on what we need for the future.
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  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by scooterscot View Post
    I disagree.

    A friend who studied psychology and then his Phd in clinical psychology began practising after 7 years of study for £22k in the NHS. The next grade was up to a maximum of £44k after 10 years of practice. That is utterly appalling. Clinical phycologists are lacking in the country. It is one of those professions whereby most clinicians know each other. Mental health is becoming a big issue now and more so in the years to come.

    Mental health is one of the most foreseeable issues of the present day we're sleepwalking into a crisis in the years ahead. The government should be planning for those years ahead but instead it pursues populist agenda and skank renumeration for those professions that are needed most.

    In fact it was a solid reason for leaving the UK myself, Engineering qualification then studied a masters in operational research (no loans I should say, worked in the summer semesters) and then offered I think it was £23k.

    Bottom line, the UK does not value skilled professionals. And until the lust for financial wizards dissipates nothing will change. Perhaps the collapse of the city would be a good thing for the country if Brexit delivers this.
    Well I agree that the salary isn't great but it's not a barrier to recruitment. Clinical psychology is one of the most competitive healthcare disciplines to get into. I know plenty of people who apply for 3, 4, 5 consecutive years. Including someone who was only successful after 4 years even though she had a PhD and several years post-doctoral experience in health psychology with significant patient contact experience.
    Where there's muck there's brass.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by original PM View Post
    Indeed - but as no one is forced to go to uni then maybe people need to think about whether they can afford it before they sign up for it.

    Bit like everything else in life.
    So the affluent families kids go to Uni, but the poor kids who are already disadvantaged by the school they go to, can't go to Uni. The poor will never be able to get themselves up the social ladder. At least under Thatcher us poor kids had a chance of social progression!
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  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whorty View Post
    So the affluent families kids go to Uni, but the poor kids who are already disadvantaged by the school they go to, can't go to Uni. The poor will never be able to get themselves up the social ladder. At least under Thatcher us poor kids had a chance of social progression!
    It's not a social ladder, it's a debt ladder.

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