Important! Anyone out there running a limited Important! Anyone out there running a limited
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  1. #1

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    Default Important! Anyone out there running a limited

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/12...il_regulation/

    Companies in the UK must include certain regulatory information on their websites and in their email footers before 1 January 2007 or they will breach the Companies Act and risk a fine.

    Every company should list its company registration number, place of registration, and registered office address on its website as a result of an update to the legislation of 1985. The information, which must be in legible characters, should also appear on order forms and in emails. Such information is already required on "business letters" but the duty is being extended to websites, order forms and electronic documents.

    The change is being made by a Statutory Instrument that is expected to be passed on Thursday to implement a European law, the First Company Law Amendment Directive, into UK law. According to a Department of Trade and Industry spokesperson, the law will take effect on 1 January, one day later than the Directive requires.

    The information is likely to appear in the footer of every email sent from a company, to avoid having to decide whether each email amounts to a "business letter" or not. Many companies do this already because the term "business letters" was thought likely to include emails even without this new clarification.

    For websites, contrary to the fears of some, the specified information does not need to appear on every page. Again, many websites will already list the required information, perhaps on their "About us" or "Legal info" pages.

    The Ecommerce Regulations, passed in 2002, require that certain information is listed on a website, including, "where the service provider is registered in a trade or similar register available to the public, details of the register in which the service provider is entered and his registration number, or equivalent means of identification in that register".

    That has been understood as including the company registration number and place of registration. The Ecommerce Regulations also required a note of "the geographic address at which the service provider is established" – which many have taken to mean the registered office address.

    However, the wording in the Ecommerce Regulations is ambiguous compared to the new provisions. Further, many organisations' sites currently omit the information, perhaps making the mistake of thinking that the Ecommerce Regulations do not apply to websites that do not sell online (in fact they apply to almost all websites).

    Information that must be on your website
    The following is the minimum information that must be on any company's website (from OUT-LAW's guide, The UK's Ecommerce Regulations).

    The name, geographic address and email address of the service provider. The name of the organisation with which the customer is contracting must be given. This might differ from the trading name. Any such difference should be explained – e.g. "XYZ.com is the trading name of XYZ Enterprises Limited."
    It is not sufficient to include a 'contact us' form without also providing an email address and geographic address somewhere easily accessible on the site. A PO Box is unlikely to suffice as a geographic address; but a registered office address would. If the business is a company, the registered office address must be included.

    If a company, the company's registration number should be given and, under the Companies Act, the place of registation should be stated (e.g. "XYZ Enterprises Limited is a company registered in England and Wales with company number 1234567")

    If the business is a member of a trade or professional association, membership details, including any registration number, should be provided.

    If the business has a VAT number, it should be stated – even if the website is not being used for e-commerce transactions.

    Prices on the website must be clear and unambiguous. Also, state whether prices are inclusive of tax and delivery costs.

    Finally, do not forget the Distance Selling Regulations which contain other information requirements for online businesses that sell to consumers (B2C, as opposed to B2B, sales). For details of these requirements, see our guide, The Distance Selling Regulations - An Overview.



    More fecking red tape.

  2. #2

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    Wasnt there a thread on this a while ago. I mean I'd expect this kind of "oops-i-didn't-search" from me but a seasoned poster

    Edit: http://forums.contractoruk.com/thread13100-website.html
    Last edited by Sockpuppet; 25th January 2007 at 19:18.

  3. #3

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    I run several businesses and this was news to me.

    Sorry for troubling you.

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    Yeh, it was covered a few weeks back. Since when did window cleaners in Slough need websites Dim?

    Fancy not knowing about the distance selling regulations!!!!! Oh ha ha ha! look everyone here is a chap who did not know about the distance selling regulations! Oh heehhe gmmmph ha ha aha hahhhhhhhhaaa Just imagine!!! not knowing about the distance selling regulations he ahhjhehhee hhhhh....

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    Oh and you don't have to include your email on your website if you're already using contact forms.

    I've read the actual Company Act amendments and emails on your website ain't in it.

    HTH

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    How the **** I am supposed to make an "honest" crust selling fake viagra, penis enlargers and blow up dolls AND put my frickin address and email on my websites?


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    Quote Originally Posted by xoggoth
    Yeh, it was covered a few weeks back. Since when did window cleaners in Slough need websites Dim?

    Fancy not knowing about the distance selling regulations!!!!! Oh ha ha ha! look everyone here is a chap who did not know about the distance selling regulations! Oh heehhe gmmmph ha ha aha hahhhhhhhhaaa Just imagine!!! not knowing about the distance selling regulations he ahhjhehhee hhhhh....
    Actually my plan b & c businesses are exempt from the distance selling regs.

    (where is the ner-ner-ne-ner-ner smiley?)

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    I've had all that on all forms (inc company website). However, I've only recently done that on design spec documents and other "internal" documents to clients, only for the "free" advertising.

    One major client has still allowed me to carry my logo on their web pages (intranet) and I cannot believe nobody has told me to take it off. It's a global intranet, and I see a huge number of hits off it.
    If you think my attitude stinks, you should smell my fingers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DimPrawn
    Actually my plan b & c businesses are exempt from the distance selling regs.

    (where is the ner-ner-ne-ner-ner smiley?)
    Customised goods?

  10. #10

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    You all seem to be aware of this:

    Such information is already required on "business letters" but the duty is being extended to websites, order forms and electronic documents.
    So you guys are telling me that on EVERY email, electronic form and EVERY website you have, you have CLEARLY shown:


    Your company reg number with the full "registered XXXX in England & Wales" bollox?

    Your trading address AND your registered address?

    Your VAT number

    This applies to EVERY website:

    Further, many organisations' sites currently omit the information, perhaps making the mistake of thinking that the Ecommerce Regulations do not apply to websites that do not sell online (in fact they apply to almost all websites).
    I can't find any UK big names that have this clearly shown.

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