Who should pay a lot more tax? Who should pay a lot more tax? - Page 3

View Poll Results: Who should be hit with big tax rises?

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  • Me

    4 33.33%
  • Someone else

    8 66.67%
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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayn200 View Post
    National insurance doesn't fund nhs. It's for employment related benefits which you generally only qualify for if you're an employee or were formerly an employee.

    I feel like if you don't know this you should do some research. This is pretty basic tulip I would expect any working adult to know.
    Oh dear oh dear:

    How the NHS is funded | The King's Fund

    From April 2003, National Insurance Contributions were increased to boost NHS funding. This increased the share of NHS funding that comes from National Insurance Contributions, but general taxation still accounts for the vast majority of NHS funding.
    https://assets.publishing.service.go...18_to_2019.pdf

    NICs also help finance the National Health Service (NHS). NICs are paid into the NIF net of money allocated to the NHS.
    Now off you trot.

    You've also missed the core issue, which is that we contractors don't contribute the same level of NI compred to similar earning PAYE colleagues, despite being broadly eligible for the same benefits. What your eligible for has little, if anything, to do with the contribution amount.

  2. #22

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  3. #23

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    Are you saying the formal government statement on the NI accounting is wrong? This is Scooter levels of idiocy. It even includes the numbers FFS, let me help you out:

    The NHS allocation is paid over by HMRC to the NHS before any contributions are paid into the NIF and so the figures
    shown are net of this NHS allocation. The NHS allocation was £25.4 billion in 2018-19 (£24.3 billion in 2017-18) and
    forms part of the total NHS funding.

  4. #24

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    It's not a tax and just because one government decided to divert some funds into nhs doesn't mean that's what it is. That's not our issue that they're trying to disguise tax increases.

    Ni is an employment insurance

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayn200 View Post
    It's not a tax and just because one government decided to divert some funds into nhs doesn't mean that's what it is. That's not our issue that they're trying to disguise tax increases.

    Ni is an employment insurance
    Moron.

  6. #26

    Prof Cunning @ Oxford Uni

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayn200 View Post
    National insurance doesn't fund nhs.
    Oh dear. Better tell parliament that they are wrong and you are right.

    National Insurance contributions: an introduction - House of Commons Library

    A fixed proportion of NI receipts are not paid into the Fund but go to the National Health Service. In January 2019 the Government Actuary’s Department (GAD) estimated that NICs would raise just under £133 billion in 2018/19, of which £107.4 billion would go into the NI Fund and £25.4 billion would go to the NHS
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  7. #27

    I live on CUK

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    Everyone who wants to benefit from public services should pay proportional tax relative to their income.

    The UK does not want to benefit from a 500+ million marketplace and thus chose not to pay. Let's see how that works out.
    "Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience". Mark Twain

  8. #28

    Prof Cunning @ Oxford Uni

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayn200 View Post
    It's not a tax and just because one government decided to divert some funds into nhs doesn't mean that's what it is.
    It's not "one government", that's how it's been for years.
    Social Security Administration Act 1992
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  9. #29

    Prof Cunning @ Oxford Uni

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  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by vwdan View Post
    Not sure what you're point is here. Regardless of what you earn elsewhere, if you take dividends out of a Ltd you get £2k free - so if you earn £50k and go and do £2k's worth of work on the side, you take home more if you get paid in divvies than you do if you pay in PAYE.
    You are looking at the low end where dividend tax (even if it was 0) is not creating any material issues (tax revenue wise).

    If dividend tax rates are aligned with income taxes then £2k will be tax free (as long as within 12k allowance)

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