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  1. #1

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    Default Here's a question for you all

    Wilfred Owen

    and his poem,

    'Dulce et decorum est'

    for those who know the translation of the title, doesn't the
    title have something in common with the contempory equivalent ?

    Milan.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by milanbenes View Post
    Wilfred Owen

    and his poem,

    'Dulce et decorum est'

    for those who know the translation of the title, doesn't the
    title have something in common with the contempory equivalent ?

    Milan.
    you mean? "How sweet and fitting it is to die for your country" or the like?
    I didn't say it was your ******* fault, I said I was blaming you!

  3. #3

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    The first two lines and the last two are taken from a poem by the Roman poet Horace.

    "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori:
    mors et fugacem persequitur virum
    nec parcit inbellis iuventae
    poplitibus timidove tergo."

    "How sweet and fitting it is to die for your native land:
    Death pursues the man who flees,
    spares not the hamstrings or cowardly backs
    Of battle-shy youths."

    It was a popular quotation in the early days of the war and carried significant meaning for the soldiers fighting it.

    Owens poem was written at the end of the war around 1917-1918 and published in 1920 and conveys the meaining that no-one who has actually fought in a war would want to glorify it.
    "Being nice costs nothing and sometimes gets you extra bacon" - Pondlife.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveB View Post
    .......

    Owens poem was written at the end of the war around 1917-1918 and published in 1920 and conveys the meaining that no-one who has actually fought in a war would want to glorify it.

    Indeed - IIRC Owen calls it "The old lie" in that poem.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveB View Post
    The first two lines and the last two are taken from a poem by the Roman poet Horace.

    "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori:
    mors et fugacem persequitur virum
    nec parcit inbellis iuventae
    poplitibus timidove tergo."

    "How sweet and fitting it is to die for your native land:
    Death pursues the man who flees,
    spares not the hamstrings or cowardly backs
    Of battle-shy youths."

    It was a popular quotation in the early days of the war and carried significant meaning for the soldiers fighting it.

    Owens poem was written at the end of the war around 1917-1918 and published in 1920 and conveys the meaining that no-one who has actually fought in a war would want to glorify it.

    <cough>
    Wikipedia
    </cough>

    B00med!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Advocate View Post
    <cough>
    Wikipedia
    </cough>

    Yup, he was foogling!

  7. #7

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    Classic poem and about the only bit of Latin I remember after leaving school.

    Siegfried Sassoon is also highly recommended if you enjoy WWI war poetry.
    Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.

    C.S. Lewis

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Board Game Geek View Post
    Classic poem and about the only bit of Latin I remember after leaving school.

    Siegfried Sassoon is also highly recommended if you enjoy WWI war poetry.
    And Jessie Pope

  9. #9

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    And Jessie Pope
    Who’s for the game, the biggest that’s played,
    The red crashing game of a fight?
    Who’ll grip and tackle the job unafraid?
    And who thinks he’d rather sit tight?

    Jessie was at the other end of the spectrum with regards to her WWI poetry, and I recall that Wilfred Owen and her had a difference of opinion about the "glory of war"
    Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.

    C.S. Lewis

  10. #10

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    Still more of a Rupert Brooke man.

    Especially "Grantchester" which anybody who's lived around Cambridge ought to read in its entirety.

    "And things are done you'd not believe
    At Madingley on Christmas Eve."

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