The loan charge is NOT a settlement "option" The loan charge is NOT a settlement "option" - Page 7
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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by eek View Post
    For 2018/19 and 2019/20?
    Obviously not, but the allowance can be carried over to offset as much as possible for the current year up to £120,000 available to off set taxable earnings.
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  2. #62

    bored now

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Bloggs View Post
    Obviously not, but the allowance can be carried over to offset as much as possible for the current year up to £120,000 available to off set taxable earnings.
    So not much use for the year 2018-2019 which was the one the person was asking about..
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  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by eek View Post
    So not much use for the year 2018-2019 which was the one the person was asking about..
    My mistake then.
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  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by SparkyB View Post
    I have been reading this thread with interest. Due to personal circumstances, I have been given an extension until the end of Nov to decide whether to pay the settlement or raise an EYU to pay the Loan Charge over 2018-19 / 2019-20 / 2020-21 SATRs. I would appreciate some clarity on how the tax calculations would be done, especially as during the above years I was a Director of a Ltd company and took a low salary and the rest in dividends,

    Obviously if we were just talking tax based on salary then this would be straight-forward, as the additional tax would be relevant to whatever tax bracket my earnings has reached, however for the year 2018-2019 I wasn’t taxed on PAYE at all (as my salary was below the threshold), however I was taxed on dividends (into the higher tax bracket).

    When I spoke to a HMRC person two days ago (he wasn’t overly confident on his answer), he stated that any Loan Charge amount would be taxed at %20 for the first £34.5k, %40 up to the next 45%, etc and that the amount earned as dividends would not impact salary bracketing. This could be a significant difference in my calculations.

    Is this your understanding as well – I.e. tax brackets can be applied in parallel to both dividends and PAYE? Meaning I would benefit from the lower rates on both sides. Or would they effectively be stacked, so any Loan Charge amount would be all taxed in the higher bracket?

    Additionally, it has been made clear to me (by a tax advice company) that if I pay the settlement then there is no way to recover any money if any litigation is successful in the future (assuming it aligns to my situation), however, If I pay the Loan Charge then there is a potential to reclaim my additional tax paid - does anyone on here agree with this statement?

    Many thanks in advance...
    What will happen is on your original SATR where you had 2000 tax free then some in 7.5% some in 34.5% and some in 38.1% (depending on how much in dividends you pay yourself ) they will add your loan amounts to your basically salary and recalculate the tax as all PAYE. Then they add your dividends to the gross PAYE income and then tax your dividends (less the 2000 tax free). So yes ulltimately your dividend tax will also get recalculated which may push dividends amounts into the higher tax bands.

    they then add the restated PAYE to the new Dividend tax amounts/bands to calculate what tax you should have paid and then deduct the amount you actually paid back in Jan to work out what the loan charge will be.

    So simply your dividends will end up in higher tax bands as they decide these bands after your loan amount is added to your existing small salary.

    Here are the bands for your info

    Tax Free £2000
    Basic rate x 7.5%
    Higher rate x 32.5%
    Additional rate x 38.1%

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