Salesforce - worth getting into? Salesforce - worth getting into? - Page 3
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  1. #21

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    First of all - huge thanks for all the replied.

    Second thing - my mate currently works at a Salesforce company and did so previously, so he mostly knows SF people and HR people from those companies. So it's kind of a SF-or-nothing kind of deal as he can only mention my name / push my CV in front of SF oriented peeps.

    Main problem I have though is that it's a leap into the unknown as I've never used the product. I did a degree in control engineering cause it's fairly interesting, with SF it looks/sounds boring and repetitive right from the start. I need to do some basic training in it first just to understand what's what.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsc View Post
    First of all - huge thanks for all the replied.

    Second thing - my mate currently works at a Salesforce company and did so previously, so he mostly knows SF people and HR people from those companies. So it's kind of a SF-or-nothing kind of deal as he can only mention my name / push my CV in front of SF oriented peeps.

    Main problem I have though is that it's a leap into the unknown as I've never used the product. I did a degree in control engineering cause it's fairly interesting, with SF it looks/sounds boring and repetitive right from the start. I need to do some basic training in it first just to understand what's what.
    I can't help you as I don't find it repetitive. We automate processes and they are all different - granted our steps are usually the same, Analysis, prototype / proof of concept followed by iterative development (on the odd occasion the process is bigger than just a short piece of work) but every week it will be a new project and things will be different again.
    Last edited by eek; 11th February 2020 at 08:49.
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  3. #23

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    Sure I understand that there's differences from project to project, but as it's all CRM isn't every package very similar up to a point where you can create a base project and just add / remove features depending on the client? this is the bit I was refering to when saying it's repetitive.

    Btw it's not like control engineering is super exciting, most SCADA projects which are basically a GUI for all the equipement the client has on site are very similar, the thing that makes it a bit more exciting is the equipment you have to interface with ie. controllers, other subsystems / DBs, "smart" devices in the field etc.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsc View Post
    Sure I understand that there's differences from project to project, but as it's all CRM isn't every package very similar up to a point where you can create a base project and just add / remove features depending on the client? this is the bit I was refering to when saying it's repetitive.

    Btw it's not like control engineering is super exciting, most SCADA projects which are basically a GUI for all the equipement the client has on site are very similar, the thing that makes it a bit more exciting is the equipment you have to interface with ie. controllers, other subsystems / DBs, "smart" devices in the field etc.
    In my world, Dynamics CRM / Power Platform work is split into 3 areas:-

    Configuration (disabling / enabling bits) - straightforward takes no time - we get junior Functional consultants to do it as they demonstrate the system and see how the company works and what data they need to collect.
    Customisation - small changes that you can do within the application (I don't know what Salesforce has, Dynamics had Business Rules for front end rules and Workflows / Power Automate for business logic). Functional consultants (i.e. BAs with experience in the product) can usually do that.
    Custom Development - big changes that require a large amount of effort. Ideally you don't do this and you wander off to Appsource and find an ISV solution that closes matches the requirement and use that. If however you can't find such a solution you need technical consultants and developers to perform that piece of work and it will be big and probably expensive.

    So in reality step 1 of any project is to find out how complex the customer needs the system to be and then it's a battle of minimising what they want into something that is as close to out of the box as possible.

    Now you may or may not enjoy that but Dynamics is still constantly changing and there are things that I wanted to do back in November that I can only really start doing yesterday and that constant improvment / changes is what makes things fun.

    It's also why we are developing what we are developing as currently Dynamics automatically rolls out changes but ISV products are kept static until upgrades are manually triggered. For banks that removes a lot of risk (and should give me a very nice business model)..l
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  5. #25

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    Those three areas seem to match what my mate described for SF, so at least on that front it's similar.

    The package I'm coming from is more script / dev heavy with only some stuff being configuration, but that makes it fairly interesting and also flexible (pain in the ass if you need to start modifying core libs though).

    Project-wise, aren't most customer requirements fairly similar as in it's 80% the same stuff + 20% extras which might be more tricky / hard to implement? I'm simply trying to understand what a basic project might cover.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsc View Post
    Those three areas seem to match what my mate described for SF, so at least on that front it's similar.

    The package I'm coming from is more script / dev heavy with only some stuff being configuration, but that makes it fairly interesting and also flexible (pain in the ass if you need to start modifying core libs though).

    Project-wise, aren't most customer requirements fairly similar as in it's 80% the same stuff + 20% extras which might be more tricky / hard to implement? I'm simply trying to understand what a basic project might cover.
    To be honest I can't say. Most of my current work is very similar - small customers all wanting the same type of things on a cheaper code base (remember I'm selling an ISV solution designed to offer just the functionality a small company needs for basic lead and opportunity management with simple support requirements). Prior to that as part of the Global consulting team my work was very much security focused so I got the more interesting security pieces of work which probably also meant more interesting projects.

    So I can't say as currently my work is 100% the same and previously it was 80% different trying to identify how to resolve their very specific issues.
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