Oi Suity (or other Raspberry PI peeps) Oi Suity (or other Raspberry PI peeps)
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  1. #1

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    Default Oi Suity (or other Raspberry PI peeps)

    I am looking to play around with a Raspberry PI, ideally I want to do something along the lines of this:

    Raspberry Pi DS18B20 Temperature Sensor Tutorial - Circuit Basics

    The PI and the DS18B20+ seem straight forward, any tips on breadboard or the connecting clips needed?

    Secondly, instead of just outputting the temperature via SSH to the command line, I want to try and visualise it in some sort of dashboard and possibly set up some alerting to web hooks like slack.

    Any tips on the best way to do that. Don't mine sending it to a "proper" server etc to show the results
    “Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.”

    ― Marcus Aurelius

  2. #2

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    Breadboards: rapid electronics or Amazon.

    Some of those funny single socket single plug wires: dunno.

    Here the temperature reading is t=28625, which means a temperature of 28.625 degrees Celsius.
    Confusing resolution with accuracy, which is +/- 0.5 deg.

    The temperature is somewhere between 29.125 and 28.125 deg C.
    When the fun stops, STOP.

  3. #3

    More time posting than coding


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    Some of the Raspberry Pi kits come complete with breadboard and connecting wires. Looks like you'll need two though.

    Here's my favourite place to buy Raspberry Pi stuff:
    Raspberry Pi — Cool Components

    Over Christmas I made a photoframe for the wife that displays the images from her Google Photos, shows the weather and train times. Used the Magic Mirror software for that.

    Recently I gave my son a Raspberry Pi 4 for his birthday and we made a minecraft server that works amazingly well. Lots of fun.

  4. #4

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    There are numerous types of display available, and various methods of getting data to them.

    Have a look at the Pimoroni website...
    Old Greg - In search of acceptance since Mar 2007. Hoping each leap will be his last.

  5. #5

    Fingers like lightning


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    A Pi is really overkill for interfacing to a one-wire sensor, an ESP8266 based board would cost much less (under $5) and do the job.

    Worth looking into, I have an internet enabled beer fridge controlled using one

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by hairymouse View Post
    Recently I gave my son a Raspberry Pi 4 for his birthday and we made a minecraft server that works amazingly well. Lots of fun.
    Do you have a link for this? (not the server, the instructions to create it!)

    qh
    He had a negative bluety on a quackhandle and was quadraspazzed on a lifeglug.

    I look forward to your all knowing and likely sarcastic and unhelpful reply.


  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by quackhandle View Post
    Do you have a link for this? (not the server, the instructions to create it!)

    qh
    Sure, here's the best instructions we found:

    Raspberry Pi Minecraft Server Setup Script w/ Startup Service

    At first we tried the install with just an SD card and it was unusable. Then we bought an SSD card (Kingston A400 SSD 120GB SATA 3 2.5” Solid State Drive) and the adaptor (StarTech 2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0 Adapter) and spent ages trying to get it to boot from the SSD card. After a LOT of faffing around, we've got a server that runs on the pi and works great. At my kid's birthday party we had 5 people connected at once with no lag or problems.

    By the way, Amazon forced me to buy two of the startech adaptors so I've got an extra I'll send to you for a fiver.

    Here's instructions on the SSD card thing:
    Raspberry Pi Cheap SSD Upgrade Guide | James A. Chambers

    And here's how to set up the pi to boot from it:
    Raspberry Pi 4 USB Boot Config Guide for SSD / Flash Drives

    Let me know how you get on

  8. #8

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    Thanks a lot for this, I bought my lad the full LABISTS kit for Christmas but have had a few issues with it (yes it is bit of a faff to setup). It had Debian pre-loaded but because I am connectioning via hdmi I have to edit or create a config file but fooked if I know how to do this.

    Then the micro sd card snapped so had to buy a new one, but I like your idea of using an ssd.

    qh
    He had a negative bluety on a quackhandle and was quadraspazzed on a lifeglug.

    I look forward to your all knowing and likely sarcastic and unhelpful reply.


  9. #9

    More time posting than coding


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    Quote Originally Posted by quackhandle View Post
    Thanks a lot for this, I bought my lad the full LABISTS kit for Christmas but have had a few issues with it (yes it is bit of a faff to setup). It had Debian pre-loaded but because I am connectioning via hdmi I have to edit or create a config file but fooked if I know how to do this.

    Then the micro sd card snapped so had to buy a new one, but I like your idea of using an ssd.

    qh
    I'd suggest that you just download the normal raspbian OS and start from there. That should allow you to just plug in a hdmi monitor, a usb mouse and keyboard and away you go. It's not very hard to load the OS onto an SD card and you can always switch back to Debian later.

    Actually, just thinking about it, it's not hard to edit that config file. It's on a partition of the SD card that's formatted for windows so you can just put the card into a windows computer and edit the files as needed.

    My kid and I did a really fun project where we installed Alexa on the pi following a tutorial from Amazon. We used a usb microphone and an external speaker and ended up with a working Alexa system.

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