The end of I.T. jobs in the U.K. The end of I.T. jobs in the U.K. - Page 2
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  1. #11

    Should post faster


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    Quote Originally Posted by elsergiovolador View Post

    ...because you'll be free to move to Bahamas (and obtain a tax residency) and do your projects from a beach and nobody will care that you enjoy some sunshine as long as the work is done and you dial in to the meetings.
    Sure... except that everyone of my contracts over the years has require a UK based PSC* (majority) owned and controlled by me, not a nominee.


    *or umbrella (obviously NOT majority..)


    So while the Bahamas or A.N.Other tax friendly place might be nice, "my" money is still taxed in the UK 1st...

    M

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paralytic View Post
    Where did you think you read this? Facebook does not count

    And, by back at work, do you mean back at work (from furlough) or back in the office?
    The context is clear. This is about remote working. There’s been various surveys by ONS and others. It was around a third working from their employer’s place of business in early August, but it has now picked up to around a half.

    People are heading back into the office as remote working fades

  3. #13

    Fingers like lightning


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    Quote Originally Posted by mjcp View Post
    Sure... except that everyone of my contracts over the years has require a UK based PSC* (majority) owned and controlled by me, not a nominee.


    *or umbrella (obviously NOT majority..)


    So while the Bahamas or A.N.Other tax friendly place might be nice, "my" money is still taxed in the UK 1st...

    M
    It may not work for every client, but depending on the market, they may find themselves to become the losers in the new situation.
    I think there are jurisdictions that offer freelancer friendly solutions, for example I think Estonia has one.

  4. #14

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    I think there are several separate issues here for me.

    One is the sustainability of mass working from home. Several surveys have come out in different countries highlighting that employee burnout is becoming a big issue and many staff are working longer hours, struggle with work/life boundaries etc. As per above, not everyone is geared up for working from home e.g. if you have young children, you are in a house share, not much space etc. I simply cannot see a situation long term where the majority of office staff are working from home more than say, 3 days a week. I guess it will depend on overall infection rates.

    Also, people are social animals and I'm not sure IT is a good representative sample of the working population, with a higher proportion of people who are orientated towards introversion rather than extroversion and hence prefer working alone. I know an increasing number of non-IT friends who are desperate to get back to the office in some form.

    There are other growing offshore centres, some in Eastern Europe which seem to have a better reputation than India for example. So I wouldn't discount that still being a factor.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesbrown View Post
    The context is clear. This is about remote working. There’s been various surveys by ONS and others. It was around a third working from their employer’s place of business in early August, but it has now picked up to around a half.

    People are heading back into the office as remote working fades
    Your sources are for all workers not just office workers. So 50% of employees are working full time at their place of employment.... This includes hospitality, construction, etc and is not just people who work in offices.

    Offices across the country are still mostly empty.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayn200 View Post
    Your sources are for all workers not just office workers. So 50% of employees are working full time at their place of employment.... This includes hospitality, construction, etc and is not just people who work in offices.

    Offices across the country are still mostly empty.
    Right, but what do you have for your last statement other than anecdote? These statistics are collected by occupation, not whether a job is “desk-based”. You’d have to make assumptions about occupations to get statistics for “office work”. The square mile is still mostly empty, but the trend is clear and it will become even clearer when schools restart.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesbrown View Post
    Right, but what do you have for your last statement other than anecdote? These statistics are collected by occupation, not whether a job is “desk-based”. You’d have to make assumptions about occupations to get statistics for “office work”. The square mile is still mostly empty, but the trend is clear and it will become even clearer when schools restart.
    No... But you made a statistical numerical claim. I did not.

    I made a generalisation based off my experience. I know people across the country and only 1 person has returned to the office and they work in London.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by jayn200 View Post
    No... But you made a statistical numerical claim. I did not.

    I made a generalisation based off my experience. I know people across the country and only 1 person has returned to the office and they work in London.
    You're making a waffly claim based on a personal anecdote. I'll go with the ONS, even if it's for workers in general.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesbrown View Post
    You're making a waffly claim based on a personal anecdote. I'll go with the ONS, even if it's for workers in general.
    Yes okay then go on thinking 50% of office workers are back to the office full time, good luck with that.

  10. #20

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    Only a small sample of 53 FTSE100 companies, and a lot has likely changed in the past couple of weeks:

    Business focus: FTSE 100 companies outline back to the office plans | London Evening Standard

    Where companies have given an estimate it looks like between 1-5% of workers are back in their offices. One company says 10-12% are back in the office.

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