Becoming a Project Manager... Becoming a Project Manager... - Page 3
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  1. #21

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    GhostofTarbera - scorchio!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TestMangler View Post
    No training needed. It's a piece of piss. Make a list of tulip that needs done, tell the c**ts that need to do it, what they have to do and when, make a colour coded chart of all the tulip and all the c**ts, make it look to the stakeholders like you did it all yourself. Job Done.
    Almost

    Blame the c**ts when you mess up

    Get new project and repeat


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  2. #22

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    TestMangler - scorchio!

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    Quote Originally Posted by GhostofTarbera View Post
    Almost

    Blame the c**ts when you mess up

    Get new project and repeat


    Sent from my iPhone using Contractor UK Forum
    he's an agent. I thought he'd already know that
    On Desolation Boulevard, they'd light the faded lights.....

  3. #23

    More time posting than coding

    jayn200 is a permanent contractor


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    Are you sure you want to be a project manager? Why? Because you saw their day rates?

    It's going to be really difficult to get that first job without any subject matter expertise. You either need experience as a PM or you need to be a subject matter expert in whatever the project is related to.

    Don't do another generic degree. You already have a business degree. If you do a masters it should be something technical but I would think long and hard about whether or not you really want to do that. If you do then you can get a government postgraduate student loan.

    If I was in your position and considering retraining into a new area I wouldn't pick PM. There are some other great areas that are growing and pay well. You can work on a MSc in Data Science online from a reputable university. If you move into data science you can sell your business degree as being relevant since you're most likely going to be analysing commercial data.

    Imperial college is a very good university and has a new data science/machine learning MSc that is fully online (Just checked and it looks like it was suspended, also looks like they want a quantitative undergraduate degree)

    MSc Machine Learning and Data Science (Online) | Study | Imperial College London

    University of London has a couple MSc data sciences that are flexible that you should be able to do while working.

    Birkbeck - Evening Study I believe
    Data Science (MSc) — Birkbeck, University of London
    Goldsmith's - Fully Online
    Data Science | University of London

    Another option would be to go down accounting/finance route. You have a business degree already you can start right away on an accounting qualification, 3 years till your qualified. Sounds like a long time but it'll go by quickly.

    There are some other paths to take but I just don't think trying to retrain into a PM when you have no subject matter expertise is the easiest thing to do, not impossible but challenging.

  4. #24

    More time posting than coding

    jayn200 is a permanent contractor


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    *Double Post*

  5. #25

    Fingers like lightning

    edison is a permanent contractor


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    Quote Originally Posted by jayn200 View Post
    Are you sure you want to be a project manager? Why? Because you saw their day rates?

    It's going to be really difficult to get that first job without any subject matter expertise. You either need experience as a PM or you need to be a subject matter expert in whatever the project is related to.

    Don't do another generic degree. You already have a business degree. If you do a masters it should be something technical but I would think long and hard about whether or not you really want to do that. If you do then you can get a government postgraduate student loan.

    If I was in your position and considering retraining into a new area I wouldn't pick PM. There are some other great areas that are growing and pay well. You can work on a MSc in Data Science online from a reputable university. If you move into data science you can sell your business degree as being relevant since you're most likely going to be analysing commercial data.

    Imperial college is a very good university and has a new data science/machine learning MSc that is fully online (Just checked and it looks like it was suspended, also looks like they want a quantitative undergraduate degree)

    MSc Machine Learning and Data Science (Online) | Study | Imperial College London

    University of London has a couple MSc data sciences that are flexible that you should be able to do while working.

    Birkbeck - Evening Study I believe
    Data Science (MSc) — Birkbeck, University of London
    Goldsmith's - Fully Online
    Data Science | University of London

    Another option would be to go down accounting/finance route. You have a business degree already you can start right away on an accounting qualification, 3 years till your qualified. Sounds like a long time but it'll go by quickly.

    There are some other paths to take but I just don't think trying to retrain into a PM when you have no subject matter expertise is the easiest thing to do, not impossible but challenging.
    Over the last couple of years, I've been informally coaching and mentoring people seeking help with IT career development. Data science/analytics is one of the areas I suggest some of them look at and the other is product management. Two novice BAs who worked for me transitioned successfully into product management and with the OP's business degree, that might be an option.

    There are also quite a number of organisations who will put people through a boot camp of anywhere from 10-18 weeks to train them to be able to start entry level jobs in product management, data science or coding. Some of these are paid for by the student, some are free. They go on to typically work on 2 year placements with clients and get charged out a relatively low day rate. There are also schemes like this for BA and PM type roles but they have been struggling to place people into roles this year. Schemes vary on the intake criteria for age/previous experience. I've used such a scheme before for BAs and the quality of people has been very good.

  6. #26

    Nervous Newbie

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    Quote Originally Posted by wattaj View Post
    ^^ This is why everyone now has "Scrum Master" on their CV. It is essentially meaningless in the current market. Completely pointless some would say.

    Even "Test Management" is in the bin as now developers, and their management, think that they can simply run a test automation suite and chuck their code into Production.
    Yes, but it gives you licence to say thing like a morning scrum that is expected to extend beyond the normal alloted time will be called a rolling mall

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