Hi out of contract contractor Hi out of contract contractor
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    Default Hi out of contract contractor

    Hi There
    been a contractor for 7 years. got lucky with a big Site manager contract, it lasted 3.5 years. then moved to the big smoke and just finished a 7 month Uk support Manager role.

    But I've never seen the contract market this tough..... cant even get to interview stage at the moment, despite 200+ applications.

    anyone else finding it this bad?

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    Quote Originally Posted by coreservers View Post
    Hi There
    been a contractor for 7 years. got lucky with a big Site manager contract, it lasted 3.5 years. then moved to the big smoke and just finished a 7 month Uk support Manager role.

    But I've never seen the contract market this tough..... cant even get to interview stage at the moment, despite 200+ applications.

    anyone else finding it this bad?
    Nope.

    But good luck.
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    You know what they say about assumptions!

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    Quote Originally Posted by coreservers View Post
    Hi There
    been a contractor for 7 years. got lucky with a big Site manager contract, it lasted 3.5 years. then moved to the big smoke and just finished a 7 month Uk support Manager role.

    But I've never seen the contract market this tough..... cant even get to interview stage at the moment, despite 200+ applications.

    anyone else finding it this bad?
    Yes. In over 20 years, I've never found it so difficult. I have had unsuccessful interviews, but I'm not such a bad bet!

    I'm tearing my hair out about how to get an IT job, any job, before the savings run out. My CV is concise, I search job boards daily and apply for a number roles every week - there's a limit to how many because I can't satisfy all the clients 'essential requirements'.

    I have worked with Unix, Sybase, scripting, Perl, C, C++, development, support, testing - perhaps just not enough of any one skill - who knows? I certainly don't.

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    Quote Originally Posted by coreservers View Post
    Hi There
    been a contractor for 7 years. got lucky with a big Site manager contract, it lasted 3.5 years. then moved to the big smoke and just finished a 7 month Uk support Manager role.

    But I've never seen the contract market this tough..... cant even get to interview stage at the moment, despite 200+ applications.

    anyone else finding it this bad?
    Yes. I'm trying hard to get into a Plan B scenario (not over confident about that either). But my confidence in agents being able to do a good job is extremely low.
    Speaking gibberish on internet talkboards since last Michaelmas. Plus here on Twitter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keen2Work View Post
    Yes. In over 20 years, I've never found it so difficult. I have had unsuccessful interviews, but I'm not such a bad bet!

    I'm tearing my hair out about how to get an IT job, any job, before the savings run out. My CV is concise, I search job boards daily and apply for a number roles every week - there's a limit to how many because I can't satisfy all the clients 'essential requirements'.

    I have worked with Unix, Sybase, scripting, Perl, C, C++, development, support, testing - perhaps just not enough of any one skill - who knows? I certainly don't.
    The doorkeepers (agents and recruiters) are looking for an excuse to drop candidates from their list. It may be worth re-writing your cv for each application stressing the relevant strengths. It seems that being adaptable and able to work in different environments is frowned upon in the current job market. You need to have 3-5 years solid experience, with no gaps, in the role you are going for. Re-jig your cv to reflect this. I suspect successful candidates are stretching their truth, so why shouldn't you?

    Disclaimer: I don't get to hear agents' feedback, so I can't say for 100% that the above is correct. If only I had a £100 for every time an agent said he'd send me feedback on an interview or job application...It's got to the stage where I assume an agent lies, as soon as he starts talking.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarillionFan View Post
    Nope.

    But good luck.


    Hello

    But isn't an out of contract contractor, basically just a normal person?
    Last edited by SimonMac; 11th May 2011 at 11:57.

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    Quote Originally Posted by coreservers View Post
    Hi There
    been a contractor for 7 years. got lucky with a big Site manager contract, it lasted 3.5 years. then moved to the big smoke and just finished a 7 month Uk support Manager role.

    But I've never seen the contract market this tough..... cant even get to interview stage at the moment, despite 200+ applications.

    anyone else finding it this bad?
    The definition of madness is doing the same thing and expecting a different result.

    If I sent my CV out 200 times with no result, I would change my CV.

    HTH
    Fiscal nomad it's legal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SimonMac View Post


    Hello

    But isn't an out of contract contractor, basically just a normal person?
    Correct. I'm a millionaire that doesn't have £1M in assets. What should I do ?
    On Desolation Boulevard, they'd light the faded lights.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keen2Work View Post
    Yes. In over 20 years, I've never found it so difficult. I have had unsuccessful interviews, but I'm not such a bad bet!

    I'm tearing my hair out about how to get an IT job, any job, before the savings run out. My CV is concise, I search job boards daily and apply for a number roles every week - there's a limit to how many because I can't satisfy all the clients 'essential requirements'.

    I have worked with Unix, Sybase, scripting, Perl, C, C++, development, support, testing - perhaps just not enough of any one skill - who knows? I certainly don't.
    When people are busy they want a concise CV, but I think the market has changed. Now they want to feel they are getting value for money, i.e. large CV.

    Speak to a few agents see what they think. But I would pad-out a version of your CV, for each role put in achivements, how you saved the client time/money.

    One thing for sure "tearing my hair out" will not help, you need to keep working on your profile, also are you on LinkedIn? if not do so and put a link to it on your CV. Get referances on LinkedIn. Join some of the agent groups etc.

    HTH
    Fiscal nomad it's legal.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by alreadypacked View Post
    When people are busy they want a concise CV, but I think the market has changed. Now they want to feel they are getting value for money, i.e. large CV.

    Speak to a few agents see what they think. But I would pad-out a version of your CV, for each role put in achivements, how you saved the client time/money.

    One thing for sure "tearing my hair out" will not help, you need to keep working on your profile, also are you on LinkedIn? if not do so and put a link to it on your CV. Get referances on LinkedIn. Join some of the agent groups etc.

    HTH
    WAPS.

    When I started looking again in March I had a number of agents tell me my CV was too brief and I needed to expand it more. This is in contast to the last time I was looking when the percieved wisdom was to keep it short and sweet.

    I always tailor the CV and cover letter to the role and make sure I include every requirement in the ad in my CV without lying outright. Agents generally know little to nothing about the subject matter of a job ad, they just match the words.

    You can also try following up your CV with a call to the agent. I generally do it 10 mins or so after submitting my CV.

    "Hi, I just sent over my CV in repsonse to X role, but I have a couple of questions."

    Engage them, get them to talk to you sell yourself and they are more likely to remember you. If your CV is a good match you may even get a commitment to put you forward there and then.

    Always ask what timescales the client is working to and make notes so you can follow up again at the appropriate point.
    If the agent says the client wants CV's in by Friday call on the following Monday afternoon/Tesuday morning to see if they have any feedback. Keep yourself at the top of the pile and keep pushing them to follow up with the client. Make the buggers work for their keep.

    The market is tough at the moment but there are jobs out here.
    "Being nice costs nothing and sometimes gets you extra bacon" - Pondlife.

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