PDA

View Full Version : Any ideas how to progress?



woohoo
20th June 2019, 13:33
Posting in general but sometimes you get some sense.

So the background.. I was away on a business trip in March, the first night I'm away the misses had several threatening calls early morning. We have one of them recorded. They knew her name and made sexual threats. Misses was petrified, we have recently moved to the country so you can imagine, large house backing onto fields.

Anyway, she called the police straight away and gave them the details.

We called the phone company and within a week they had the details of the number etc. But would only give it out to the police. We gave a statement to the police the women dealing with it, couldn't be arsed. Anyway, she said she had to apply for the phone number etc off the phone company. Weeks later nothing, apparently she went on long term sick leave. The person taking over, then went on long term sick leave.
Eventually, last week they got the details and the number belongs to a large retail firm and two names are associated with the number.

Anyway, the police have just came back and said that the retail firm said the phone was stolen in December. The police are therefore closing the case. That's it, just stopped replying to questions.

This just doesn't sound right or am i missing something. Large retail firm has phone reported stolen in December would the number still be active and paid for in March? Or if the police contacted the retail firm and they talked to the person holding the phone and they said it was stolen in December would they still not interview the person etc. What am I missing?

I know it's not the crime of the century, but I imagine the person makes these calls has done it a number of times and still its natural to want that person to be caught.

Is there anyway I can progress this and no my accountant doesn't have a ******* clue?

NotAllThere
20th June 2019, 13:57
Shutting the stable door when the horse has bolted maybe, but there are services that will give you the details of a number, including name and address, for a fee.

You could try hiring a private detective. The difficulty there is getting someone recommended.

We get a huge volume of spam calls, non-threatening thankfully, so all our landline calls are routed to the answering machine. We get an email with the message, so we can play that back on our mobile phones. We can also time limit the answering machine, so that e.g. from 10am to 4pm, it will let calls through.

jbond007
20th June 2019, 14:01
Posting in general but sometimes you get some sense.

So the background.. I was away on a business trip in March, the first night I'm away the misses had several threatening calls early morning. We have one of them recorded. They knew her name and made sexual threats. Misses was petrified, we have recently moved to the country so you can imagine, large house backing onto fields.

Anyway, she called the police straight away and gave them the details.

We called the phone company and within a week they had the details of the number etc. But would only give it out to the police. We gave a statement to the police the women dealing with it, couldn't be arsed. Anyway, she said she had to apply for the phone number etc off the phone company. Weeks later nothing, apparently she went on long term sick leave. The person taking over, then went on long term sick leave.
Eventually, last week they got the details and the number belongs to a large retail firm and two names are associated with the number.

Anyway, the police have just came back and said that the retail firm said the phone was stolen in December. The police are therefore closing the case. That's it, just stopped replying to questions.

This just doesn't sound right or am i missing something. Large retail firm has phone reported stolen in December would the number still be active and paid for in March? Or if the police contacted the retail firm and they talked to the person holding the phone and they said it was stolen in December would they still not interview the person etc. What am I missing?

I know it's not the crime of the century, but I imagine the person makes these calls has done it a number of times and still its natural to want that person to be caught.

Is there anyway I can progress this and no my accountant doesn't have a ******* clue?

Has she had calls since March ?

woohoo
20th June 2019, 14:10
Shutting the stable door when the horse has bolted maybe, but there are services that will give you the details of a number, including name and address, for a fee.

You could try hiring a private detective. The difficulty there is getting someone recommended.

We get a huge volume of spam calls, non-threatening thankfully, so all our landline calls are routed to the answering machine. We get an email with the message, so we can play that back on our mobile phones. We can also time limit the answering machine, so that e.g. from 10am to 4pm, it will let calls through.

I'm thinking more how I can progress it with the police. The number was linked to a corporate account and a name, doesn't make sense that the number would still be active 3-4 months after reported stolen. Sounds like the retail firm contacted the employee and the excuse was phone was stolen in December. Which is a pretty shitty excuse.

It doesn't seem to make sense.

Old Greg
20th June 2019, 15:24
Really sorry to hear this. Poor Mrs woohoo. It's really shit.

In honesty, I don't think you are ever going to get to the bottom of this, and I'm not sure it's the best use of time and emotional energy. On the practicality side of corporate phones, a mate of mine moved back to the UK from Ireland and his employer (utility) had no process for taking the phone back. He was told to keep it and keep using it. A year later and it's still working.

woohoo
20th June 2019, 15:30
Really sorry to hear this. Poor Mrs woohoo. It's really tulip.

In honesty, I don't think you are ever going to get to the bottom of this, and I'm not sure it's the best use of time and emotional energy. On the practicality side of corporate phones, a mate of mine moved back to the UK from Ireland and his employer (utility) had no process for taking the phone back. He was told to keep it and keep using it. A year later and it's still working.

Cheers Greg, the wife is over it now but she is a focused bundle of evil that wants to hunt this person down.

You have a point about it not being the best use of time, I just think that my wife isnt the first person to be contacted by this perv and sounds like she wont be the last. I imagine this person being a sad individual and needing some help.

Good info about taking the phone back, but I thought a company like John Lewis would have a process to cancel stolen phone numbers within 3-4 months.

Old Greg
20th June 2019, 15:48
Cheers Greg, the wife is over it now but she is a focused bundle of evil that wants to hunt this person down.

You have a point about it not being the best use of time, I just think that my wife isnt the first person to be contacted by this perv and sounds like she wont be the last. I imagine this person being a sad individual and needing some help.

Good info about taking the phone back, but I thought a company like John Lewis would have a process to cancel stolen phone numbers within 3-4 months.

Never underestimate the inefficiency of a large corporate body.

I'm not in your wife's position, but my tendency is to get Zen about things like this (very different scenario but Mrs OG had an evil bully of a boss some years back). Being evil is its own punishment. Be grateful you're not like that. Do something positive like raise some money for victims of sexual violence or domestic abuse. The perpetrators will never know but this is the best revenge (and I'm not sure there are any viable route towards prosecution or a good pasting). Just my twopennyworth.

woohoo
20th June 2019, 16:10
Never underestimate the inefficiency of a large corporate body.

I'm not in your wife's position, but my tendency is to get Zen about things like this (very different scenario but Mrs OG had an evil bully of a boss some years back). Being evil is its own punishment. Be grateful you're not like that. Do something positive like raise some money for victims of sexual violence or domestic abuse. The perpetrators will never know but this is the best revenge (and I'm not sure there are any viable route towards prosecution or a good pasting). Just my twopennyworth.

All good points mate.

Old Greg
20th June 2019, 16:20
All good points mate.

I hope you both find resolution in whatever way works.

northernladuk
20th June 2019, 16:23
I'm thinking more how I can progress it with the police. The number was linked to a corporate account and a name, doesn't make sense that the number would still be active 3-4 months after reported stolen. Sounds like the retail firm contacted the employee and the excuse was phone was stolen in December. Which is a pretty tulipty excuse.

It doesn't seem to make sense.

It's not unlikely. Many companies off boarding processes are atrocious. When I left CSC I handed all all my kit back including SIM in the phone, signed for it and left thinking nothing of it.

Had a friend I speak to occasionally contact me 6 months or so later saying he keeps leaving messages and I don't reply. Rang the old number and lo and behold it's still got my VM on it.

It's more likely to happen if it's a large corporate.

Horrible situation so hope you can get some closure soon.

Whorty
20th June 2019, 16:36
I'm thinking more how I can progress it with the police. The number was linked to a corporate account and a name, doesn't make sense that the number would still be active 3-4 months after reported stolen. Sounds like the retail firm contacted the employee and the excuse was phone was stolen in December. Which is a pretty tulipty excuse.

It doesn't seem to make sense.

Do you know who the retail company is? If so, get the details of the CEO, CIO, HR Director or similar (usually fairly easy - just need their name and an example of a member of staff's email address and put 2 and 2 together). Email your chosen exec and explain to them what happened and ask them how they are going to deal with it.

May or may not work, but I used this tactic with a large company when I has having issues with their service (not the same as your situation but might work). I didn't get a response off the exec, but within 10 minutes of the email I had their personal assistant on the phone. They took responsibility for the problem and suddenly, everything was sorted!

Mine was a measly service issue ... can't believe they won't be falling over themselves to help you out given the sh1t your wife has had to deal with.

woohoo
20th June 2019, 21:18
It's not unlikely. Many companies off boarding processes are atrocious. When I left CSC I handed all all my kit back including SIM in the phone, signed for it and left thinking nothing of it.

Had a friend I speak to occasionally contact me 6 months or so later saying he keeps leaving messages and I don't reply. Rang the old number and lo and behold it's still got my VM on it.

It's more likely to happen if it's a large corporate.

Horrible situation so hope you can get some closure soon.

Cheers, fair enough. I suppose I was worried that the police are looking for any excuse to close it. But does sound like it’s possible that the company would not cancel a phone straight away if it was stolen.

woohoo
20th June 2019, 21:19
Do you know who the retail company is? If so, get the details of the CEO, CIO, HR Director or similar (usually fairly easy - just need their name and an example of a member of staff's email address and put 2 and 2 together). Email your chosen exec and explain to them what happened and ask them how they are going to deal with it.

May or may not work, but I used this tactic with a large company when I has having issues with their service (not the same as your situation but might work). I didn't get a response off the exec, but within 10 minutes of the email I had their personal assistant on the phone. They took responsibility for the problem and suddenly, everything was sorted!

Mine was a measly service issue ... can't believe they won't be falling over themselves to help you out given the sh1t your wife has had to deal with.

We did think about this and may still do it but really the outcome that we want is for the police to knock on this pervs door.

Whorty
20th June 2019, 21:24
We did think about this and may still do it but really the outcome that we want is for the police to knock on this pervs door.
My experience with cops is pretty poor. Having been burgled in London, plus separately a Vespa stolen, and both times the cops had no interest. Even though I caught the 2 tw@ts who burgled us and gave them a slap .... cops were more interested in warning me I could get done for assault!

vetran
20th June 2019, 21:37
My experience with cops is pretty poor. Having been burgled in London, plus separately a Vespa stolen, and both times the cops had no interest. Even though I caught the 2 tw@ts who burgled us and gave them a slap .... cops were more interested in warning me I could get done for assault!


Indeed the stupidity of our Guardians is terrifying.

Ofcom is responsible but toothless.

Abusive and threatening calls - Ofcom (https://www.ofcom.org.uk/phones-telecoms-and-internet/advice-for-consumers/problems/tackling-nuisance-calls-and-messages/abusive-and-threatening-calls)

NotAllThere
21st June 2019, 05:04
Cheers, fair enough. I suppose I was worried that the police are looking for any excuse to close it.Worry no more! They are.

woohoo
21st June 2019, 08:51
My experience with cops is pretty poor. Having been burgled in London, plus separately a Vespa stolen, and both times the cops had no interest. Even though I caught the 2 tw@ts who burgled us and gave them a slap .... cops were more interested in warning me I could get done for assault!

My Dad dealt with an intruder a few years back and when it comes to that type of thing the law is a mess. But I don't want to knock the police, it just seemed a clear cut thing. Phone number linked to a corporation with a name using that phone.

Apparently, we can request the details from the police and call the number directly but at this stage seems pointless. Just wanted the perv to be confronted by the police.

Anyway, thanks all for letting me vent and reassuring me that I've not missed something simple.

sal
21st June 2019, 12:36
Cheers, fair enough. I suppose I was worried that the police are looking for any excuse to close it. But does sound like it’s possible that the company would not cancel a phone straight away if it was stolen.

At least they identified the owner of the number, which is more than they do in a lot of cases. All counties have lists of types of crime that are straight out ignored because they don't have resources.

There was an episode of Dispatches last year with some shocking revelations on this subject:

Lawless Britain: Where are the Police? Channel 4 Dispatches | Channel 4 (https://www.channel4.com/press/news/lawless-britain-where-are-police-channel-4-dispatches)

As for large corp not blocking a stolen phone, it's not surprising. If it was a smart phone the IT have most likely remote wiped/locked the handset, but the SIM is probably one of 1000s and they either cba isolating it and/or don't have process of doing that. The person from whom it was stolen was likely just handed a new headset with pre-installed SIM with a new number and the case was closed.