PDA

View Full Version : Negative people when starting up!



meraff
31st July 2010, 09:11
I am keen to move into contracting by the end of the year. The project at my current permanent job is coming to an end and it just feels like the right time for me to move into contracting.

Did anybody else find their family/friends who were negative about moving into contracting when you were looking? I appreciate the market isn't exactly booming, but we all have to start at some point.

Rant over....

malvolio
31st July 2010, 10:02
I am keen to move into contracting by the end of the year. The project at my current permanent job is coming to an end and it just feels like the right time for me to move into contracting.

Did anybody else find their family/friends who were negative about moving into contracting when you were looking? I appreciate the market isn't exactly booming, but we all have to start at some point.

Rant over....I described it once as like taking up skydiving. Nobody has any sane reason to justify stepping out of a perfectly serviceable aircraft 20,000 feet in the sky. Until you do it... :yay:

Just be very clear about your reasons (big hint: money isn't it :wink ) and that you can survive the first six months financially without crippling yourself. And read all the guides you can find - the one on this site and the PCG Guide to Freelancing should be compulsory reading.

Gonzo
31st July 2010, 10:05
Did anybody else find their family/friends who were negative about moving into contracting when you were looking? I appreciate the market isn't exactly booming, but we all have to start at some point.My parents never really understood it, and I deliberately never explained to them, so it remained a mystery to them.

Many of my friends either were contractors or worked with contractors, and they were OK.

Those don't matter so much.

The one that really matters was that Mrs Gonzo understood and was supportive. She earned a good permie salary and so if things had gone badly wrong then we could have lived on only her salary.

The biggest question for you is if there is a Mrs or Mr Meraff, how are they going to react when you have finished one contract and three or four months have gone past and there is still no sign of the next one? Some partners cannot cope with this level of uncertainty.

HairyArsedBloke
31st July 2010, 12:26
I described it once as like taking up skydiving. Nobody has any sane reason to justify stepping out of a perfectly serviceable aircraft 20,000 feet in the sky. Until you do it... :yay:

Just be very clear about your reasons (big hint: money isn't it :wink ) and that you can survive the first six months financially without crippling yourself. And read all the guides you can find - the one on this site and the PCG Guide to Freelancing should be compulsory reading.

It's not often I agree with malvolio, but in this case he is spot on.

Don't give a frack what anyone else ever says. It's your life, not theirs. It's like anything in life; better to try and fail than to live the rest of your life with thoughts of what could have been eating away at your soul.

When I was a lot younger I was alway shy and full of doubts about what people would think. This came from a family background where cynicism, snide remarks, and 'woulda, coulda, shoulda' ruled.

It took me a while, but now I have the self confidence to say FRACK THE LOT OF YOU. I'm going to do it my way. :banana:

Support Monkey
31st July 2010, 20:20
Couple of years back contract came to an end and i took 3 months off, 1 month in and father in law says to me why have you not gone and signed on as your unemployed, most normal working people don,t get it at all and even the people in companies you contract for will ask if your hoping the company make you permanent.

There is never a right time but be clear, times are very very hard, do your research and make sure you have marketable skills and do it for the lifestyle not the money

And its very true what the others say if Mrs Meraff is not behind you your gonna get it in the neck the minute your benched for a couple of months

meraff
1st August 2010, 11:45
Thanks for the replies. Thankfully I do have a supportive Mrs who is in a permanent role, and who can afford to cover the basic living costs if I am not working (i.e. mortgage, utils, food). I also have money set aside which would last for another 6 months if we were both out of work. Despite all of this, it certainly is hard to make the jump.

I believe I do have good skill base as a Microsoft orientated developer, with good experience considering my age (28) as I have been lucky enough to work in a job where I tend to jump from project to project picking up new skills on the way.

I'm not really looking to move to contracting just for the money, my main reasons are:
- I get bored after 1-2 years at the same company! Contracting allows me to move around often.
- I am finding that I have reached a point in my career where my employer is keen to push experienced developers into management roles. Hopefully in the long-term, contracting will offer me the money I would get from moving into management, but allow me to stay in a role I love.
- I like the idea of having my own company and being my own boss. I would consider myself to be good with money (and good at putting money aside!), so hopefully this will put me in good stead.
- Although I don't want to be out of work all the time :), I like the idea of having breaks between work where I am able to consolidate my skills and learn new ones.

norrahe
1st August 2010, 14:04
Thanks for the replies. Thankfully I do have a supportive Mrs who is in a permanent role, and who can afford to cover the basic living costs if I am not working (i.e. mortgage, utils, food). I also have money set aside which would last for another 6 months if we were both out of work. Despite all of this, it certainly is hard to make the jump.

I believe I do have good skill base as a Microsoft orientated developer, with good experience considering my age (28) as I have been lucky enough to work in a job where I tend to jump from project to project picking up new skills on the way.

I'm not really looking to move to contracting just for the money, my main reasons are:
- I get bored after 1-2 years at the same company! Contracting allows me to move around often.
- I am finding that I have reached a point in my career where my employer is keen to push experienced developers into management roles. Hopefully in the long-term, contracting will offer me the money I would get from moving into management, but allow me to stay in a role I love.
- I like the idea of having my own company and being my own boss. I would consider myself to be good with money (and good at putting money aside!), so hopefully this will put me in good stead.
- Although I don't want to be out of work all the time :), I like the idea of having breaks between work where I am able to consolidate my skills and learn new ones.

Get a good first gig, stay there long enough to build up a decent warchest and then you can look at taking (some) time off to skill up.

Find yourself a good accountant.

Just make sure you can stand out from the crowd skills wise. Before you take that leap, try and get as many courses off your permie company.

meraff
1st August 2010, 14:34
Before you take that leap, try and get as many courses off your permie company.

Lol, already on that. I've been pushing through as many exam vouchers as possible in order to beef up my CV.

Gonzo
2nd August 2010, 08:20
Thanks for the replies. Thankfully I do have a supportive Mrs who is in a permanent role, and who can afford to cover the basic living costs if I am not working (i.e. mortgage, utils, food). I also have money set aside which would last for another 6 months if we were both out of work. Despite all of this, it certainly is hard to make the jump.

I believe I do have good skill base as a Microsoft orientated developer, with good experience considering my age (28) as I have been lucky enough to work in a job where I tend to jump from project to project picking up new skills on the way.That is a good starting point.


I'm not really looking to move to contracting just for the money, my main reasons are:
- I get bored after 1-2 years at the same company! Contracting allows me to move around often.
- I am finding that I have reached a point in my career where my employer is keen to push experienced developers into management roles. Hopefully in the long-term, contracting will offer me the money I would get from moving into management, but allow me to stay in a role I love.
- I like the idea of having my own company and being my own boss. I would consider myself to be good with money (and good at putting money aside!), so hopefully this will put me in good stead.
- Although I don't want to be out of work all the time :), I like the idea of having breaks between work where I am able to consolidate my skills and learn new ones.These are all the right reasons for wanting to work on a contract basis.

So, to summarize, you are in a strong position to start contracting and your reasons for wanting to do so are sound.

There is just one last nagging doubt - if you aren't sure and you need to ask whether you should jump or not then are you sure you are up to it?

We've all been uncharacteristically nice to you on this thread, we must remember to have a post-mortem on that later, but the main point is that the real world is harsher, much harsher.

HairyArsedBloke
2nd August 2010, 08:28
We've all been uncharacteristically nice to you on this thread, ....

Can I start to ask him, the questions now?

Gonzo
2nd August 2010, 08:30
Can I start to ask him, the questions now?Go on, he has got away very lightly so far. :rolleyes:

zeitghost
2nd August 2010, 11:14
Can I start to ask him, the questions now?

Gowon, you know you want to. :smokin

meraff
2nd August 2010, 18:31
Hmm, I obviously haven't read around enough.... what is "the question"?

HairyArsedBloke
2nd August 2010, 18:43
Hmm, I obviously haven't read around enough.... what is "the question"?

I do love it when this happens.

Well, since you ask ......

For starters,

meraff, do you ever hang around a gymnasium?

northernladuk
2nd August 2010, 18:52
Hmm, I obviously haven't read around enough.... what is "the question"?

Like a lamb to the slaughter :tired

wacky77
2nd August 2010, 19:15
To be honest do what feels right to you and only you. I contracted for 20 years and loved every minute of it (blissfully retired now!) If i`d of listened to others I wouldnt of experienced travelling the world, meeting the people I have and earning good money.

1 piece of imperative advice - speak to a qualified tax consultant. No point in earning the cash if they can take it back. :wink

SupremeSpod
3rd August 2010, 15:38
To be honest do what feels right to you and only you. I contracted for 20 years and loved every minute of it (blissfully retired now!) If i`d of listened to others I wouldnt of experienced travelling the world, meeting the people I have and earning good money.

1 piece of imperative advice - speak to a qualified tax consultant. No point in earning the cash if they can take it back. :wink

You might've learned to spell though.

But seriously, if your partner is supportive and doesn't just spend all the money you'll be fine. Contracting isn't for everyone - thank goodness otherwise the market would be saturated!

lukemg
4th August 2010, 08:47
You are facing the same resistance and doubts that many of us have in the past, the reality is that many contractors do it from a position of having nothing to lose. They will have been made redundant or be in a place where there is very little keeping them there so it doesn't seem much of a leap.
My dad stayed at the same company for ever despite other opportunities which might have seen him do 'better' (whatever that means) elsewhere, he still did ok.
When I was talking to him about going contracting I thought he would say no - stay in the safe place. He surprised me by saying go for it, if it doesn't work out, it won't be your last job, something else will turn up.
Just make sure your skills have some future as your success on the open market will follow that.

northernladuk
4th August 2010, 11:52
I am keen to move into contracting by the end of the year. The project at my current permanent job is coming to an end and it just feels like the right time for me to move into contracting.

Did anybody else find their family/friends who were negative about moving into contracting when you were looking? I appreciate the market isn't exactly booming, but we all have to start at some point.

Rant over....

and to be honest at times your family/partners being a bit negative about you contracting is going to be the very least of your worries. If you are getting yourself wound up about someone elses opinion then you are going to find it very tough in a office full of negative permies.

quackhandle
5th August 2010, 10:30
Sometimes it's about taking life by the balls and going for it - only you can do that though. I had only 3.5 years exp in my field and I'd had enough of office politics and corporate climbers so I tried contracting. My first contract was at Microsoft (I use MS server apps) which was frustrating at first but all in all a fantastic 9m contract, in that time managed to pay off all of my debts and save a deposit for house. Then I didn't work for four months, even though I had MS on my CV. So I got to see both sides of contracting very early on. All in all eights years later I *like* contracting, have worked for 12 companies so have gained tons of experience.

Since Jan 2009 I was on the bench until Aug 09 then 6 month contract, then nothing March-May 2010. That was tough going, esp 2009 when wife was made redundant also. Now in gig until mid Sept but wife is 6m pregnant, so wondering if I should venture down the dark side. :eyes

Was already contracting when I met my gf/wife so she understood and my father has contracted on and off for last 20 years, so no hassle there. My old school car builder Father-in-law is a different story though! Hasn't a clue about contracting at all. :laugh

Good luck.

qh

ps -stay away from Brookson and Paystream if you can help it.

alreadypacked
11th August 2010, 07:49
Nobody has said anything about the first people he will have to deal with "Agents"

Read some of the threads in General, it's not pretty.

Welcome to CUK, where's the drinks cabinet?

Two months on this new contract and still no work.

Mich the Tester
11th August 2010, 08:36
Any change you make in life is likely to meet with resistance from people around you, unless it’s an undoubtedly positive change like giving up smoking or getting treated for a booze problem; even then, there’ll probably be people who’ll say you won’t succeed.

Any change that has a degree of uncertainty just worries a lot of people a bit. Many people cling to the false security of doing the same thing every day, in the same way in the same place, with the same people. Many of those people end up on the scrapheap, dumped by a boss at HQ who’s never met them, because the quarterly figures, over which they have little or no influence, were 0.5% below “analysts’ expectations”.

Basically, if you want to lead an enjoyable life and give your family and enjoyable life, you need to be prepared to make regular changes; no publicly owned company will show loyalty to employees when there’s an extra dollar to be earned by replacing them or sacking them; you shouldn’t show them loyalty.

You’ll find as soon as you get into your first contract that you feel free; you will feel more confident about what you can achieve. That confidence will help you sell yourself to clientcos and to those you deal with at clientco. You will feel more free, because you will be free.

Get on with it. Your life belongs to you, not to the naysayers.


Oh, and don't lick the chutney spoon in Indian restaurants; you don't know where it's been (sorry folks, I know that's an old one but it still cracks me up).

d000hg
11th August 2010, 13:33
There is just one last nagging doubt - if you aren't sure and you need to ask whether you should jump or not then are you sure you are up to it?


and to be honest at times your family/partners being a bit negative about you contracting is going to be the very least of your worries. If you are getting yourself wound up about someone elses opinion then you are going to find it very tough in a office full of negative permies.
Not the "if you have to ask, you aren't cut out for it" spiel again. It's a total change to your lifestyle and if you don't know many contractors you don't really know what to expect. Anyone who makes such a decision without asking for advice and thinking it through carefully is not taking it seriously enough.

northernladuk
11th August 2010, 14:19
Not the "if you have to ask, you aren't cut out for it" spiel again. It's a total change to your lifestyle and if you don't know many contractors you don't really know what to expect. Anyone who makes such a decision without asking for advice and thinking it through carefully is not taking it seriously enough.

I don't see why my quote is the 'if you have to' ask spiel. My comment was around who he is speaking to in the context of his original post. You are totally right in what you say but the OP is specifically talking about negativity from family and friends not fellow contractors.

d000hg
12th August 2010, 07:32
Mis-read you then, my point stands but count yourself not in my cross-hair :)

swamp
15th August 2010, 19:36
The 'classic' contractor is smart, outgoing, but just could never fit into the corporate machine.

Let me put it another way...

When you were at school did you sit at the back of the class (and piss about) but still got the top mark in the exam? If "yes" then go contracting :)