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View Full Version : Should I try to acquire a taste for Marmite?



Bwana
19th May 2011, 20:33
For years I've been in the habit of reading the nutrition lables on food products (yeah I know - sad geek, calorie-counter, and various other insults that could be thrown). I look at the nutritional content per 100g, as that gives me the percentage of each food group. I'm always impressed when I see a high protein content (as long as the fat isn't too high). I was well impressed with Marmite, and amazed at the protein content. So I tried it... only to find that not only did I not like it, but the taste almost made me want to throw-up. For a start, I think I'd spread it too thickly. I've now been trying spreading a tiny amount on one corner of my toast, very thinly, in an attempt to gradually get myself used to the taste of it, in the hope that it will be good nutrition for me. Is this wise? Am I right or wrong to try to force my body to like Marmite? What does the panel think?

Cheers,
Bwana

TykeMerc
19th May 2011, 20:37
I love the stuff, but I think it's probably one of those things you've got to be brought up liking. It's also got quite a bit of salt in it which might poke holes in your healthy food theory.

TestMangler
19th May 2011, 20:42
No. Just NO. NO NO No No !!

:puke:

d000hg
19th May 2011, 20:44
If it's spread very thin, even at 100% protein you'd not be getting a significant amount. You might as well just eat dry toast!

Ruprect
19th May 2011, 20:50
I always hated it as a kid. My nearest and dearest all eat it, so thought I'd give it another try. While it wasn't completely repellent, it's not something I'll be spreading on my toast on a regular basis...

Moscow Mule
19th May 2011, 21:03
hmmmm toast and marmite. Yummy.

Also goes well in tuna mayo.

MaryPoppins
19th May 2011, 21:05
A serious dilemma indeed. You're very brave for posting about this.

I can't offer any advice, but I do love marmite.

Incognito
19th May 2011, 21:13
Am I right or wrong to try to force my body to like Marmite?

I'd rather snog a Tim.

:sick

russell
19th May 2011, 21:17
There's a study somewhere correlating liking of marmite and low IQ, I hate it.

EternalOptimist
19th May 2011, 21:22
Southern limp wristed shandy drinkers, one and all.

Put 2 spoonfuls in a cup, add boiling water, get a slice of bread and, hey presto
a healthy and cheap cup of beef soup, full of goodness. and salt



:rolleyes:

DimPrawn
19th May 2011, 21:39
Southern limp wristed shandy drinkers, one and all.

Put 2 spoonfuls in a cup, add boiling water, get a slice of bread and, hey presto
a healthy and cheap cup of beef soup, full of goodness. and salt



:rolleyes:

That's Bovril, or condensed cow as it should be properly called.

Marmite is the bottom of the brewers beer barrel.

TimberWolf
19th May 2011, 21:45
I don't recall ever trying Marmite, though I'm sure I must have done at one time. Bovril likewise. I don't think either can taste any worse than a pot noodle (a real one).

wobbegong
20th May 2011, 06:51
That's Bovril, or condensed cow as it should be properly called.

Not so. It changed to a yeast extract recipie in 2004.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/04/Bovril_250g.jpg/459px-Bovril_250g.jpg

wobbegong
20th May 2011, 06:53
hmmmm toast and marmite. Yummy.

Also goes well in tuna mayo.

Spread thinly on toast, under mature cheddar, then grilled.

Oh yes! :tongue

Churchill
20th May 2011, 07:15
Liking Marmite is genetic.

Bovril used to be a by-product of making corned-beef iirc.

doodab
20th May 2011, 10:08
Marmite is quite nice.

Bovril is disgusting.

DaveB
20th May 2011, 10:14
Liking Marmite is genetic.

Bovril used to be a by-product of making corned-beef iirc.

It did. Corned beef is made by boiling bits of cow till they fall apart, mincing it up and salting it before squashing it into a can.

Bovril was made by taking the water the beef had been boiled in, condensinig it down to a sticky goo and adding lots more salt.

I like both (Marmite and Bovril) but Marmite is better :D

gingerjedi
20th May 2011, 12:29
I like Twiglets but not Marmite, how can this be? :confused:

doodab
20th May 2011, 12:34
I like Twiglets but not Marmite, how can this be? :confused:

I'm the only person in my house who likes twiglets, which is quite good at christmas time as I get them all to myself.

Unfortunately having lived in Germany where they have the most wonderful giant "Brezn" in the beer gardens I will never be anything other than disappointed with those crunchy little pretzels we have in the UK.

It's all swings and roundabouts isn't it.

fragglerock
20th May 2011, 13:22
Not so. It changed to a yeast extract recipie in 2004.


It is back to beef now.

(still revolting!)
http://www.britishfoodsonline.co.uk/ekmps/shops/crofts/images/bovril-paste-jar-250g-518-p.jpg

gingerjedi
20th May 2011, 13:40
I'm the only person in my house who likes twiglets, which is quite good at christmas time as I get them all to myself.

Unfortunately having lived in Germany where they have the most wonderful giant "Brezn" in the beer gardens I will never be anything other than disappointed with those crunchy little pretzels we have in the UK.

It's all swings and roundabouts isn't it.

They don't put yeast extract on the big pretzels do they? I've drunk beer in Berlin and lots more in Munich and I only remember them being very salty? I must say I wasn't taken with any of the local German food, I mostly eat Turkish and Italian when I was there.

doodab
20th May 2011, 13:47
They don't put yeast extract on the big pretzels do they? I've drunk beer in Berlin and lots more in Munich and I only remember them being very salty? I must say I wasn't taken with any of the local German food, I mostly eat Turkish and Italian when I was there.

No just salt. You can brush it off. I can't believe you didn't like roast pork, sausages, krautsalat, kartoffelsalat, beergarden chicken and stecklerfisch etc. The kebabs are nice though, I had two of them last night.