Use 3rd party CMS Vs. Writing functionality yourself Use 3rd party CMS Vs. Writing functionality yourself
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  1. #1

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    Default Use 3rd party CMS Vs. Writing functionality yourself

    Putting a website together for somebody.
    They want to be able to manage content - Edit / create pages based on 1 column or 2 column template & add a link in the nav bar. Content will go in a database, I guess.

    Fairly basic stuff but I'm not that au fait with CMS & the digging around I've done has left me not being able to see the wood for the trees; I'm doing this with the .Net MVC stack so have been looking at Dot Net Nuke & Umbraco.

    Half tempted to write the functionality myself - can't help thinking it'll be quicker than getting over the CMS learning curve. Anyone else doing this kind of thing?

  2. #2

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    I wrote a fairly effective CMS system myself that was to be integrated into an existing application.

    I looked at a few systems but in the end wrote it myself, got a java wiki library (bliki) for syntax conversion and hacked it up in a week.

    A page would be a topic and that would have few text boxes for header, menu and footer which were also topics.

    Integrated with bootstrap so you could put in raw html which would do your grids and stuff. Fully responsive.

    Really you are talking 10-15 pages, and it works better than most of the mince out there.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by minestrone View Post
    I wrote a fairly effective CMS system myself that was to be integrated into an existing application.

    I looked at a few systems but in the end wrote it myself, got a java wiki library (bliki) for syntax conversion and hacked it up in a week.

    A page would be a topic and that would have few text boxes for header, menu and footer which were also topics.

    Integrated with bootstrap so you could put in raw html which would do your grids and stuff. Fully responsive.

    Really you are talking 10-15 pages, and it works better than most of the mince out there.
    What did you need the java library for? Not familiar with syntax conversion...

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  5. #5

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    Umbracco is the most flexible and easiest to code on, but it comes with a heavy price of just being a bare bones CMS

    But if you use it a lot, and reuse code libraries it quickly becomes a deployment platform and CMS

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by MicrosoftBob View Post
    Umbracco is the most flexible and easiest to code on, but it comes with a heavy price of just being a bare bones CMS

    But if you use it a lot, and reuse code libraries it quickly becomes a deployment platform and CMS
    I think the main challenge is going to be training up my nontechnical client to use use Umbraco from what I've seen of it so far.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gumbo Robot View Post
    I think the main challenge is going to be training up my nontechnical client to use use Umbraco from what I've seen of it so far.
    Get the Courier Express add on that will help a bit

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by MicrosoftBob View Post
    Get the Courier Express add on that will help a bit
    I'll look into that. Thanks.

  9. #9

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    I created an admin system, just downloaded a bootstrap admin theme (paid for a decent one). I reuse this or at least part of it on several projects. So the admin site looks the biz.

    Use asp.net identity for login/rules etc. MVC5, dapper for DB access.

    Then if i need new functionality for example a mini CMS I just add the functionality to this. Sounds like it your mini CMS is pretty basic and I would write my own.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by woohoo View Post
    I created an admin system, just downloaded a bootstrap admin theme (paid for a decent one). I reuse this or at least part of it on several projects. So the admin site looks the biz.

    Use asp.net identity for login/rules etc. MVC5, dapper for DB access.

    Then if i need new functionality for example a mini CMS I just add the functionality to this. Sounds like it your mini CMS is pretty basic and I would write my own.
    Users also need to be able to upload PDF files which will be shown as links containing a thumbnail of the cover page of the PDF.

    That sounds like a ball ache to write so I may continue down the Umbraco / DNN route for the time being.

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